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Assembled by Hyperdub’s Steve Goodman and filmmaker Nick Dwyer, this 34-track compilation offers a retro-futurist deep dive into a lost world of incidental music of surprising power and poignancy.

Certain tracks stand out. Hiroto Saitou’s work for “Metal Stoker” is a great place to start: The shimmering melodies recall Kraftwerk ’s “Pocket Calculator,” pinging and chiming with infectious artifice, while the drum programing owes a debt to King Crimson ’s Bill Bruford. Tadahiro Nitta’s contributions to “Xak II” and “Illusion City,” “An-Un (Ominous Clouds)” and “Metal Area,” both pulsate with gritty aggression worthy of Chuck Norris’ Delta Force movies. And Manabu Saito’s whimsical “Telepathy,” from the game “Chatty,” is one of the sweetest earworms I’ve heard in recent memory. Its hollowed-out square waves and skipping rhythm telegraph an ephemeral lightness.

RBMA’s series interviews a handful of producers and musicians, including Flying Lotus and Thundercat , who sing the praises of these soundtracks and declare their lasting influence. There’s certainly a direct link to grime’s spartan first wave; some of that genre’s earliest tracks were made on Playstation consoles , and this track from Wolverine: Adamantium Rage directly prefigures the genre by almost a decade. More recently, the hazy memory worlds of Actress and Oneohtrix Point Never feel inexorably tinted by these past futures.

Assembled by Hyperdub’s Steve Goodman and filmmaker Nick Dwyer, this 34-track compilation offers a retro-futurist deep dive into a lost world of incidental music of ...

This A Collection of Japanse Inro from Japan is just one of the amazing artifacts available from Oceanic Arts Australia. We are a tribal art dealer supplying ...

14.10.2017  · Hyperdub make their first ever reissue foray with Diggin In The Carts: A Collection of Pioneering Japanese Video Game Music (Original Game Soundtrack),

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Additionally, a 503 Service Unavailable error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

Assembled by Hyperdub’s Steve Goodman and filmmaker Nick Dwyer, this 34-track compilation offers a retro-futurist deep dive into a lost world of incidental music of surprising power and poignancy.

Certain tracks stand out. Hiroto Saitou’s work for “Metal Stoker” is a great place to start: The shimmering melodies recall Kraftwerk ’s “Pocket Calculator,” pinging and chiming with infectious artifice, while the drum programing owes a debt to King Crimson ’s Bill Bruford. Tadahiro Nitta’s contributions to “Xak II” and “Illusion City,” “An-Un (Ominous Clouds)” and “Metal Area,” both pulsate with gritty aggression worthy of Chuck Norris’ Delta Force movies. And Manabu Saito’s whimsical “Telepathy,” from the game “Chatty,” is one of the sweetest earworms I’ve heard in recent memory. Its hollowed-out square waves and skipping rhythm telegraph an ephemeral lightness.

RBMA’s series interviews a handful of producers and musicians, including Flying Lotus and Thundercat , who sing the praises of these soundtracks and declare their lasting influence. There’s certainly a direct link to grime’s spartan first wave; some of that genre’s earliest tracks were made on Playstation consoles , and this track from Wolverine: Adamantium Rage directly prefigures the genre by almost a decade. More recently, the hazy memory worlds of Actress and Oneohtrix Point Never feel inexorably tinted by these past futures.

The server is temporarily unable to service your request due to maintenance downtime or capacity problems. Please try again later.

Additionally, a 503 Service Unavailable error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

Assembled by Hyperdub’s Steve Goodman and filmmaker Nick Dwyer, this 34-track compilation offers a retro-futurist deep dive into a lost world of incidental music of surprising power and poignancy.

Certain tracks stand out. Hiroto Saitou’s work for “Metal Stoker” is a great place to start: The shimmering melodies recall Kraftwerk ’s “Pocket Calculator,” pinging and chiming with infectious artifice, while the drum programing owes a debt to King Crimson ’s Bill Bruford. Tadahiro Nitta’s contributions to “Xak II” and “Illusion City,” “An-Un (Ominous Clouds)” and “Metal Area,” both pulsate with gritty aggression worthy of Chuck Norris’ Delta Force movies. And Manabu Saito’s whimsical “Telepathy,” from the game “Chatty,” is one of the sweetest earworms I’ve heard in recent memory. Its hollowed-out square waves and skipping rhythm telegraph an ephemeral lightness.

RBMA’s series interviews a handful of producers and musicians, including Flying Lotus and Thundercat , who sing the praises of these soundtracks and declare their lasting influence. There’s certainly a direct link to grime’s spartan first wave; some of that genre’s earliest tracks were made on Playstation consoles , and this track from Wolverine: Adamantium Rage directly prefigures the genre by almost a decade. More recently, the hazy memory worlds of Actress and Oneohtrix Point Never feel inexorably tinted by these past futures.

Assembled by Hyperdub’s Steve Goodman and filmmaker Nick Dwyer, this 34-track compilation offers a retro-futurist deep dive into a lost world of incidental music of ...

This A Collection of Japanse Inro from Japan is just one of the amazing artifacts available from Oceanic Arts Australia. We are a tribal art dealer supplying ...

14.10.2017  · Hyperdub make their first ever reissue foray with Diggin In The Carts: A Collection of Pioneering Japanese Video Game Music (Original Game Soundtrack),

The Japanese collection is a rich source of information on the history, culture and current affairs of Japan, The collection is the largest in Australia and focuses primarily on modern and contemporary Japan. The major strengths are in the subject fields of the social sciences, especially popular culture and contemporary social issues. Japanese modern history (after 1868 Meiji Restoration) includes  the history of Australia-Japan nation to nation and people to people relationships.  The collection on Japanese traditional performing and visual arts are  also is growing.

The Library actively seeks and purchases new materials and also offers major digital resources on Japan. These include Japan Knowledge, Asahi Shinbun Online titled, ‘Kikuzo’ and Yomiuri Shinbun Online titled, 'Yomidasu'.

A further strength of the Japanese collections is a number of research collections. They include Harold S. Williams Book Collection (on the history of  foreign settlements in Japan),  Sakakibara Collection and Kegan Paul Collection both on Japanese and East Asian classics.

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A Collection of Japanse Inro Japan - Oceanic Arts Australia


Japanese Collections - Harvard-Yenching Library - Harvard.

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