Welcome Pauline Narvaez, who has joined the Marine Parasitology Laboratory for her PhD research. Pauline spent six months volunteering in the laboratory earlier this year assisting with various research projects. She will be supervised by Kate and Prof Mark McCormick for her project investigating food preferences of cleaner organisms and the impact of cleaning interactions on pathogen transmission.

Welcome Tian Xu who has joined the laboratory for his Masters of Philosophy and will be supervised by Associate Professor Chaoshu Zeng and cosupervised by Kate Hutson. Tian’s research will develop captive breeding techniques for two marine ornamental crabs: the Harlequin Crab Lissocarcinus laevis and the Decorator Crab Camposcia retusa . Congratulations also to Tian who won the Student Prize and People's choice award for the Centre for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Photo Competition with this stunning capture of a school of cardinal fish!

Kate Hutson successfully applied to become a Scientific Advisory Committee member of the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Subprogram (AAHBS). The AAHBS comprises government, industry and university representatives and meets three times per year to ensure that FRDC research objectives are commercially focused and outcome driven and to facilitate industry extension and technology transfer.

Welcome Pauline Narvaez, who has joined the Marine Parasitology Laboratory for her PhD research. Pauline spent six months volunteering in the laboratory earlier this year assisting with various research projects. She will be supervised by Kate and Prof Mark McCormick for her project investigating food preferences of cleaner organisms and the impact of cleaning interactions on pathogen transmission.

Welcome Tian Xu who has joined the laboratory for his Masters of Philosophy and will be supervised by Associate Professor Chaoshu Zeng and cosupervised by Kate Hutson. Tian’s research will develop captive breeding techniques for two marine ornamental crabs: the Harlequin Crab Lissocarcinus laevis and the Decorator Crab Camposcia retusa . Congratulations also to Tian who won the Student Prize and People's choice award for the Centre for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Photo Competition with this stunning capture of a school of cardinal fish!

Kate Hutson successfully applied to become a Scientific Advisory Committee member of the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Subprogram (AAHBS). The AAHBS comprises government, industry and university representatives and meets three times per year to ensure that FRDC research objectives are commercially focused and outcome driven and to facilitate industry extension and technology transfer.

1530s, "a hanger-on, a toady, person who lives on others," from Middle French parasite (16c.) or directly from Latin parasitus "toady, sponger," and directly from Greek parasitos "one who lives at another's expense, person who eats at the table of another," from noun use of an adjective meaning "feeding beside," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + sitos "food," of unknown origin. Scientific meaning "animal or plant that lives on others" is first recorded 1640s (implied in parasitical ).

An organism that grows, feeds, and is sheltered on or in a different organism while contributing nothing to the survival of its host.

An organism that lives off or in another organism, obtaining nourishment and protection while offering no benefit in return. Human parasites are often harmful to the body and can cause diseases, such as trichinosis .

Parasitism is a form of one-sided symbiosis . [1] [2] The parasites live off the host . They may, or may not, harm the host. Parasitoids , on the other hand, usually kill their hosts. A parasitic relationship is the opposite of a mutualistic relationship . [3] Examples of parasites in humans include tapeworms and leeches . World-wide, the most serious cause of human death by a parasite is malaria .

"Humans are hosts to nearly 300 species of parasitic worms and over 70 species of protozoa , some derived from our primate ancestors and some acquired from the animals we have domesticated or come in contact with during our relatively short history on Earth. Our knowledge of parasitic infections extends into antiquity". [5]

When the above definition is applied, many organisms which eat plants can be seen as parasites, because they feed largely or wholly on one individual plant. Examples would include many herbivorous insects: the Hemiptera or true bugs ( leafhoppers , froghoppers , aphids , scale insects and whiteflies ). The larvae of Lepidoptera usually feed and mature on a single individual of the host plant species, and what they eat accounts for most of the food for their complete life span. Moreover, caterpillars can and often do serious damage to the host's foliage. Other orders also have many parasitic herbivores: Thysanoptera (thrips), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies).

The entire lesion is susceptible to secondary bacterial infections which cause even more damage to the skin. Infestations of lice are less harmful than are those of mites but are serious in some geographic locations.

Animals plagued by external parasites become anxious and do not feed or rest well. This is particularly true in the case of sheep blowfly strike. The result of parasite worry may be reduced gains and possibly even weight loss.

Sucking of blood by keds and ticks can be a serious drain on animals, which must continually replace the lost blood. When the tick population is sufficiently high and these parasites feed for considerable lengths of time, iron stores, which are used for blood elements, become depleted and anemia occurs. Infested animals may be forced to use ingested nutrients to replace losses rather than to build lean body mass or muscle, thereby reducing weight gain. Death may eventually result.

Welcome Pauline Narvaez, who has joined the Marine Parasitology Laboratory for her PhD research. Pauline spent six months volunteering in the laboratory earlier this year assisting with various research projects. She will be supervised by Kate and Prof Mark McCormick for her project investigating food preferences of cleaner organisms and the impact of cleaning interactions on pathogen transmission.

Welcome Tian Xu who has joined the laboratory for his Masters of Philosophy and will be supervised by Associate Professor Chaoshu Zeng and cosupervised by Kate Hutson. Tian’s research will develop captive breeding techniques for two marine ornamental crabs: the Harlequin Crab Lissocarcinus laevis and the Decorator Crab Camposcia retusa . Congratulations also to Tian who won the Student Prize and People's choice award for the Centre for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Photo Competition with this stunning capture of a school of cardinal fish!

Kate Hutson successfully applied to become a Scientific Advisory Committee member of the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Subprogram (AAHBS). The AAHBS comprises government, industry and university representatives and meets three times per year to ensure that FRDC research objectives are commercially focused and outcome driven and to facilitate industry extension and technology transfer.

1530s, "a hanger-on, a toady, person who lives on others," from Middle French parasite (16c.) or directly from Latin parasitus "toady, sponger," and directly from Greek parasitos "one who lives at another's expense, person who eats at the table of another," from noun use of an adjective meaning "feeding beside," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + sitos "food," of unknown origin. Scientific meaning "animal or plant that lives on others" is first recorded 1640s (implied in parasitical ).

An organism that grows, feeds, and is sheltered on or in a different organism while contributing nothing to the survival of its host.

An organism that lives off or in another organism, obtaining nourishment and protection while offering no benefit in return. Human parasites are often harmful to the body and can cause diseases, such as trichinosis .

Parasitism is a form of one-sided symbiosis . [1] [2] The parasites live off the host . They may, or may not, harm the host. Parasitoids , on the other hand, usually kill their hosts. A parasitic relationship is the opposite of a mutualistic relationship . [3] Examples of parasites in humans include tapeworms and leeches . World-wide, the most serious cause of human death by a parasite is malaria .

"Humans are hosts to nearly 300 species of parasitic worms and over 70 species of protozoa , some derived from our primate ancestors and some acquired from the animals we have domesticated or come in contact with during our relatively short history on Earth. Our knowledge of parasitic infections extends into antiquity". [5]

When the above definition is applied, many organisms which eat plants can be seen as parasites, because they feed largely or wholly on one individual plant. Examples would include many herbivorous insects: the Hemiptera or true bugs ( leafhoppers , froghoppers , aphids , scale insects and whiteflies ). The larvae of Lepidoptera usually feed and mature on a single individual of the host plant species, and what they eat accounts for most of the food for their complete life span. Moreover, caterpillars can and often do serious damage to the host's foliage. Other orders also have many parasitic herbivores: Thysanoptera (thrips), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies).

Welcome Pauline Narvaez, who has joined the Marine Parasitology Laboratory for her PhD research. Pauline spent six months volunteering in the laboratory earlier this year assisting with various research projects. She will be supervised by Kate and Prof Mark McCormick for her project investigating food preferences of cleaner organisms and the impact of cleaning interactions on pathogen transmission.

Welcome Tian Xu who has joined the laboratory for his Masters of Philosophy and will be supervised by Associate Professor Chaoshu Zeng and cosupervised by Kate Hutson. Tian’s research will develop captive breeding techniques for two marine ornamental crabs: the Harlequin Crab Lissocarcinus laevis and the Decorator Crab Camposcia retusa . Congratulations also to Tian who won the Student Prize and People's choice award for the Centre for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Photo Competition with this stunning capture of a school of cardinal fish!

Kate Hutson successfully applied to become a Scientific Advisory Committee member of the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Subprogram (AAHBS). The AAHBS comprises government, industry and university representatives and meets three times per year to ensure that FRDC research objectives are commercially focused and outcome driven and to facilitate industry extension and technology transfer.

1530s, "a hanger-on, a toady, person who lives on others," from Middle French parasite (16c.) or directly from Latin parasitus "toady, sponger," and directly from Greek parasitos "one who lives at another's expense, person who eats at the table of another," from noun use of an adjective meaning "feeding beside," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + sitos "food," of unknown origin. Scientific meaning "animal or plant that lives on others" is first recorded 1640s (implied in parasitical ).

An organism that grows, feeds, and is sheltered on or in a different organism while contributing nothing to the survival of its host.

An organism that lives off or in another organism, obtaining nourishment and protection while offering no benefit in return. Human parasites are often harmful to the body and can cause diseases, such as trichinosis .

Obligate parasite - Wikipedia


Ectoparasites and classification - Home: OIE

Posted by 2018 article