The role of men is being transformed by globalised forces from economics to technology to feminism. And men are faring particularly badly in many areas of life. From homelessness to education, alcohol and drug misuse to general life expectancy, they are clearly finding it increasingly difficult to cope as they try to adapt to circumstances that are entirely unprecedented.

As a result, male suicide rates are at a 15-year high. Every year in the UK over 4,500 men kill themselves – nearly three times as many annually as all deaths caused by road accidents*.

This hidden killer is now the single biggest cause of death in men aged 20–45 in the UK, with males accounting for 78 per cent of all suicides in this country. In contrast, female suicide rates are declining.

The role of men is being transformed by globalised forces from economics to technology to feminism. And men are faring particularly badly in many areas of life. From homelessness to education, alcohol and drug misuse to general life expectancy, they are clearly finding it increasingly difficult to cope as they try to adapt to circumstances that are entirely unprecedented.

As a result, male suicide rates are at a 15-year high. Every year in the UK over 4,500 men kill themselves – nearly three times as many annually as all deaths caused by road accidents*.

This hidden killer is now the single biggest cause of death in men aged 20–45 in the UK, with males accounting for 78 per cent of all suicides in this country. In contrast, female suicide rates are declining.

London, Dec. 22, 2017 (AltAfrika) -Many commentators have identified a ‘crisis in masculinity’, especially but not exclusively in North America, Europe and the Middle East. But this ‘crisis’ is really just a form of journalistic shorthand that describes what happens to some men − and groups of men − when technological, geopolitical, religious and other systemic and historical changes disrupt old gender hierarchies and social structures, establishing new gender norms and forging new identities.

In these fluid circumstances, some men adapt and evolve to the changing times. For them there is no crisis, only opportunities for growth and for pioneering new ways of being men.

In recent decades, this category of men includes gay, bisexual and transgender men, who have been forging new professional identities and relational arrangements in societies around the world where historical oppression and constraints have eased against non-traditional gender and sexual expression.

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Get Full Access Now or Learn more

The role of men is being transformed by globalised forces from economics to technology to feminism. And men are faring particularly badly in many areas of life. From homelessness to education, alcohol and drug misuse to general life expectancy, they are clearly finding it increasingly difficult to cope as they try to adapt to circumstances that are entirely unprecedented.

As a result, male suicide rates are at a 15-year high. Every year in the UK over 4,500 men kill themselves – nearly three times as many annually as all deaths caused by road accidents*.

This hidden killer is now the single biggest cause of death in men aged 20–45 in the UK, with males accounting for 78 per cent of all suicides in this country. In contrast, female suicide rates are declining.

London, Dec. 22, 2017 (AltAfrika) -Many commentators have identified a ‘crisis in masculinity’, especially but not exclusively in North America, Europe and the Middle East. But this ‘crisis’ is really just a form of journalistic shorthand that describes what happens to some men − and groups of men − when technological, geopolitical, religious and other systemic and historical changes disrupt old gender hierarchies and social structures, establishing new gender norms and forging new identities.

In these fluid circumstances, some men adapt and evolve to the changing times. For them there is no crisis, only opportunities for growth and for pioneering new ways of being men.

In recent decades, this category of men includes gay, bisexual and transgender men, who have been forging new professional identities and relational arrangements in societies around the world where historical oppression and constraints have eased against non-traditional gender and sexual expression.

Get Full Access Now or Learn more

Get Full Access Now or Learn more

Toxic masculinity is embedded in South African culture, as evidenced by the spurt of gender-based violence highlighted by the media since January 2017, and manifests itself in a myriad of overt and covert ways. Toxic masculinity dictates that male-female, and male-male relations are fraught with tension- sexual, emotional and physical- and encourage competition, more than it encourages co-operation.

For too long, gender-based violence (and all gender issues) have been conflated with women’s issues, and perceived as something distinct from that which affects men. While gender and women studies are inextricably linked, it is both ignorant and dangerous to exclude men from the conversation, since the latter group predominantly upholds the culture in which gendered oppression and marginalisation exists. Inviting men into spaces that interrogates toxic masculinity is fundamental to subverting misogyny, dismantling patriarchy, and by extension, ending gendered violence.

The role of men is being transformed by globalised forces from economics to technology to feminism. And men are faring particularly badly in many areas of life. From homelessness to education, alcohol and drug misuse to general life expectancy, they are clearly finding it increasingly difficult to cope as they try to adapt to circumstances that are entirely unprecedented.

As a result, male suicide rates are at a 15-year high. Every year in the UK over 4,500 men kill themselves – nearly three times as many annually as all deaths caused by road accidents*.

This hidden killer is now the single biggest cause of death in men aged 20–45 in the UK, with males accounting for 78 per cent of all suicides in this country. In contrast, female suicide rates are declining.

London, Dec. 22, 2017 (AltAfrika) -Many commentators have identified a ‘crisis in masculinity’, especially but not exclusively in North America, Europe and the Middle East. But this ‘crisis’ is really just a form of journalistic shorthand that describes what happens to some men − and groups of men − when technological, geopolitical, religious and other systemic and historical changes disrupt old gender hierarchies and social structures, establishing new gender norms and forging new identities.

In these fluid circumstances, some men adapt and evolve to the changing times. For them there is no crisis, only opportunities for growth and for pioneering new ways of being men.

In recent decades, this category of men includes gay, bisexual and transgender men, who have been forging new professional identities and relational arrangements in societies around the world where historical oppression and constraints have eased against non-traditional gender and sexual expression.

Get Full Access Now or Learn more

Get Full Access Now or Learn more

Toxic masculinity is embedded in South African culture, as evidenced by the spurt of gender-based violence highlighted by the media since January 2017, and manifests itself in a myriad of overt and covert ways. Toxic masculinity dictates that male-female, and male-male relations are fraught with tension- sexual, emotional and physical- and encourage competition, more than it encourages co-operation.

For too long, gender-based violence (and all gender issues) have been conflated with women’s issues, and perceived as something distinct from that which affects men. While gender and women studies are inextricably linked, it is both ignorant and dangerous to exclude men from the conversation, since the latter group predominantly upholds the culture in which gendered oppression and marginalisation exists. Inviting men into spaces that interrogates toxic masculinity is fundamental to subverting misogyny, dismantling patriarchy, and by extension, ending gendered violence.

On a recent episode of The Art of Charm Podcast , Craig Wilkinson shared an illuminating story about his native South Africa. In some areas, he explained, elephant populations grow too large. So park rangers have two options: They can start shooting the elephants, or they can move some elephants to another location. In one case, rangers opted for the latter, relocating a population of young elephants across the country.

Not long after, the young male elephants began running riot. They killed lots of other animals, not for food or protection, but for the sheer thrill of it. No one could figure out what the problem was. Finally, someone decided that the adolescent elephants needed some male role models. Rangers introduced older male elephants into the population, and within two weeks, the problems cleared up. The killing stopped, and the population grew tame. The older elephants both policed the younger ones and modeled good behavior.

Put simply, no one is born knowing how to be a man. We learn the right ways from good men around us. In the past, that meant a literal father. But as Wilkinson points out, the crisis of masculinity is the crisis of fatherhood. In fact, UNICEF cites absentee fathers as the main driver behind the biggest social issues of our time. And “‘fatherless’ doesn’t just mean a father who isn’t there,” he explains. “It’s a father who’s not engaged.”

The role of men is being transformed by globalised forces from economics to technology to feminism. And men are faring particularly badly in many areas of life. From homelessness to education, alcohol and drug misuse to general life expectancy, they are clearly finding it increasingly difficult to cope as they try to adapt to circumstances that are entirely unprecedented.

As a result, male suicide rates are at a 15-year high. Every year in the UK over 4,500 men kill themselves – nearly three times as many annually as all deaths caused by road accidents*.

This hidden killer is now the single biggest cause of death in men aged 20–45 in the UK, with males accounting for 78 per cent of all suicides in this country. In contrast, female suicide rates are declining.

London, Dec. 22, 2017 (AltAfrika) -Many commentators have identified a ‘crisis in masculinity’, especially but not exclusively in North America, Europe and the Middle East. But this ‘crisis’ is really just a form of journalistic shorthand that describes what happens to some men − and groups of men − when technological, geopolitical, religious and other systemic and historical changes disrupt old gender hierarchies and social structures, establishing new gender norms and forging new identities.

In these fluid circumstances, some men adapt and evolve to the changing times. For them there is no crisis, only opportunities for growth and for pioneering new ways of being men.

In recent decades, this category of men includes gay, bisexual and transgender men, who have been forging new professional identities and relational arrangements in societies around the world where historical oppression and constraints have eased against non-traditional gender and sexual expression.

Young Men Are Facing a Masculinity Crisis | Time


The Crisis of Masculinity | What is it to Be a Man?

Posted by 2018 article

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