Fox News learns some surprising facts about the jumper's uniform from New York Ski Educational Foundation coach and veteran ski jumper, Colin Delaney.

Since its 1979 release, Apocalypse Now has been widely regarded as one of the most powerful and influential films about the Vietnam War. Were it not for the final thirty minutes, I might agree. There's little doubt that the bulk of the movie, which features actor Martin Sheen's trek from the normality of Saigon to the backwaters of Cambodia, is compelling material. But Apocalypse Now falls apart with the arrival of Marlon Brando. Putting aside the simple fact that the ending is anticlimactic and disappointing, the picture's final half-hour is borderline-incoherent, badly written, and highlights a pair of poorly realized performances (Brando and Dennis Hopper).

Martin Sheen plays Captain Benjamin Willard, a U.S. military officer who is dying for an assignment. Even though the film stays with him for most of its running length, Willard remains much of a mystery. He is our guide, but details about his history are dropped like breadcrumbs. By the time the movie reaches its climax, we know more about Willard's elusive quarry, Colonel Walter E. Kurtz (Brando), than we do about the film's protagonist. This is intentional; Willard is a stand-in for every audience member. He is not a superhero. He is prone to make mistakes and to place too much trust in his superiors.

His mission is to penetrate into Cambodia, locate Colonel Kurtz, and terminate him with "extreme prejudice." Kurtz is a decorated and highly respected Green Beret who has set himself up as a god somewhere in the jungle, and is committing actions that are not sanctioned by the United States government. Whether or not he is sane is irrelevant (although it's clear that Willard's superiors believe he has lost his mind); Kurtz has become a danger and an embarrassment, and must be eliminated.

Fox News learns some surprising facts about the jumper's uniform from New York Ski Educational Foundation coach and veteran ski jumper, Colin Delaney.

Fox News learns some surprising facts about the jumper's uniform from New York Ski Educational Foundation coach and veteran ski jumper, Colin Delaney.

Since its 1979 release, Apocalypse Now has been widely regarded as one of the most powerful and influential films about the Vietnam War. Were it not for the final thirty minutes, I might agree. There's little doubt that the bulk of the movie, which features actor Martin Sheen's trek from the normality of Saigon to the backwaters of Cambodia, is compelling material. But Apocalypse Now falls apart with the arrival of Marlon Brando. Putting aside the simple fact that the ending is anticlimactic and disappointing, the picture's final half-hour is borderline-incoherent, badly written, and highlights a pair of poorly realized performances (Brando and Dennis Hopper).

Martin Sheen plays Captain Benjamin Willard, a U.S. military officer who is dying for an assignment. Even though the film stays with him for most of its running length, Willard remains much of a mystery. He is our guide, but details about his history are dropped like breadcrumbs. By the time the movie reaches its climax, we know more about Willard's elusive quarry, Colonel Walter E. Kurtz (Brando), than we do about the film's protagonist. This is intentional; Willard is a stand-in for every audience member. He is not a superhero. He is prone to make mistakes and to place too much trust in his superiors.

His mission is to penetrate into Cambodia, locate Colonel Kurtz, and terminate him with "extreme prejudice." Kurtz is a decorated and highly respected Green Beret who has set himself up as a god somewhere in the jungle, and is committing actions that are not sanctioned by the United States government. Whether or not he is sane is irrelevant (although it's clear that Willard's superiors believe he has lost his mind); Kurtz has become a danger and an embarrassment, and must be eliminated.

Willard:
When I was here, I wanted to be there, when I was there all I could think of was getting back into the jungle.

Willard:
Been here a week now, waiting for a mission, getting softer. Every minute I stay in this room, I get weaker, and every minute Charlie squats in the bush, he gets stronger.

Kurtz:
We must kill them. We must incinerate them. Pig after pig. Cow after cow. Village after village. Army after army.

Chef (Frederic Forrest) in Apocalypse Now - Shmoop


Apocalypse Now - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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