Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now wasn’t the only movie about Vietnam released during the ‘70s. But as Roger Ebert put it , Apocalypse Now is a “grand and grave and insanely inspired gesture of filmmaking” that makes it one of the most iconic movies about war.

The lines of fiction and reality were blurred throughout the making of the movie, detailed in the 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse — a must-see for any fan of the film or ‘70s filmmaking. Apocalypse Now was released on this day back in 1979, and 36 years later audiences are still fascinated by Coppola’s production.

Here are 20 things you might not know about Apocalypse Now — a movie that almost didn’t get made and one in which its cast and crew almost lost themselves forever in the process.

En Sabah Nur , a powerful mutant believed to be the first of his kind, rules ancient Egypt until he is betrayed by his worshippers, who entomb him alive. His four lieutenants die preserving him. Awakening in 1983, he believes humanity has lost its way without his presence. Aiming to destroy and remake the world, he recruits a Cairo pickpocket Ororo Munroe , who can control the weather, and upgrades her power.

In East Berlin , shape-shifting mutant Raven discovers Kurt Wagner , a blue skinned mutant who can teleport . Raven rescues Kurt and requests black marketeer Caliban to transport him to America. En Sabah Nur recruits Caliban's enforcer, Psylocke , who leads him to mutant fighting champion Angel . En Sabah Nur enhances both of their powers, repairing Angel's damaged wings and transforming them into metal.

Alex Summers discovers that his younger brother Scott is manifesting a mutation for shooting optic beams. Alex takes Scott to Professor Charles Xavier 's educational institute in Westchester County, New York , hoping that Xavier and Hank McCoy will teach him to control his abilities. Scott meets the telepathic and telekinetic Jean Grey , and the two develop an attraction, while Raven brings Kurt to the institute. En Sabah Nur's powers cause disturbances around the world, leading Xavier and Alex to consult with CIA operative Moira MacTaggert , who has been researching the legend of Nur.

Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now wasn’t the only movie about Vietnam released during the ‘70s. But as Roger Ebert put it , Apocalypse Now is a “grand and grave and insanely inspired gesture of filmmaking” that makes it one of the most iconic movies about war.

The lines of fiction and reality were blurred throughout the making of the movie, detailed in the 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse — a must-see for any fan of the film or ‘70s filmmaking. Apocalypse Now was released on this day back in 1979, and 36 years later audiences are still fascinated by Coppola’s production.

Here are 20 things you might not know about Apocalypse Now — a movie that almost didn’t get made and one in which its cast and crew almost lost themselves forever in the process.

Apocalypse Now - Wikipedia


Apocalypse Now (1979) - IMDb

Posted by 2018 article

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