It seems like it might be easier to take a second baby in stride, but knowing how precious our sweet girl is to us makes me even more grateful for and awestruck by this blessing. It was hard to imagine what our love for a child would feel like before we had June, and certainly how much fun it would be to be a mama — but now I know!! This time around, I’ve loved anticipating all of the good stuff that’s coming (like movement soon!), and it’s been nice to feel a little more prepared for the hard stuff, too.

That being said, keeping my expectations low has been my biggest challenge so far with baby number two. Y’all know how I feel about expectations – I live and die by them, as there are few things that more strongly affect my happiness and overall life satisfaction.

Last time around, pregnancy and life with a newborn was pretty much a gigantic blank slate. Specifically, I never had illusions about how wonderful the newborn phase would be. In fact, I expected it to be hard, frustrating, and exhausting, with a steep learning curve. I wasn’t depressed about this; I just figured it would be something we’d have to get through, and it would get better every day.

It seems like it might be easier to take a second baby in stride, but knowing how precious our sweet girl is to us makes me even more grateful for and awestruck by this blessing. It was hard to imagine what our love for a child would feel like before we had June, and certainly how much fun it would be to be a mama — but now I know!! This time around, I’ve loved anticipating all of the good stuff that’s coming (like movement soon!), and it’s been nice to feel a little more prepared for the hard stuff, too.

That being said, keeping my expectations low has been my biggest challenge so far with baby number two. Y’all know how I feel about expectations – I live and die by them, as there are few things that more strongly affect my happiness and overall life satisfaction.

Last time around, pregnancy and life with a newborn was pretty much a gigantic blank slate. Specifically, I never had illusions about how wonderful the newborn phase would be. In fact, I expected it to be hard, frustrating, and exhausting, with a steep learning curve. I wasn’t depressed about this; I just figured it would be something we’d have to get through, and it would get better every day.

Roald Dahl’s George’s Marvellous Medicine is a fantastic read. It follows a boy called George who has to look after his awful Grandma whilst his mum goes out. Dahl’s initial description of George’s Grandma immediately gets the reader on side, there is a whole section where Grandma is trying to frighten and terrorise George with her wicked lies and twisted imagination. When George has to give Grandma her medicine he comes up with a plan, to make a concoction of anything and everything he can find with some quite startling results.

I initially heard this story being read to a year 2 class and was struck by how much the children loved the use of adjectives to describe the different ingredients. The children thought the book was hilarious and were eager to hear more every day. I thoroughly enjoyed the story however some people may be wary as it is based on how to poison an evil old woman so this may not be suitable for very young children. Never the less, the detailed description is brilliant.

I think this book would be an excellent example of something parents can read with their children for enjoyment, or a book children could read to their parents if they were particularly confident readers. This book is packed with funny and exciting language and also has some short comical poems. I would recommend this book for parents to read to their children as the constant use of brilliant vocabulary creates an exciting rhythm.

It seems like it might be easier to take a second baby in stride, but knowing how precious our sweet girl is to us makes me even more grateful for and awestruck by this blessing. It was hard to imagine what our love for a child would feel like before we had June, and certainly how much fun it would be to be a mama — but now I know!! This time around, I’ve loved anticipating all of the good stuff that’s coming (like movement soon!), and it’s been nice to feel a little more prepared for the hard stuff, too.

That being said, keeping my expectations low has been my biggest challenge so far with baby number two. Y’all know how I feel about expectations – I live and die by them, as there are few things that more strongly affect my happiness and overall life satisfaction.

Last time around, pregnancy and life with a newborn was pretty much a gigantic blank slate. Specifically, I never had illusions about how wonderful the newborn phase would be. In fact, I expected it to be hard, frustrating, and exhausting, with a steep learning curve. I wasn’t depressed about this; I just figured it would be something we’d have to get through, and it would get better every day.

Roald Dahl’s George’s Marvellous Medicine is a fantastic read. It follows a boy called George who has to look after his awful Grandma whilst his mum goes out. Dahl’s initial description of George’s Grandma immediately gets the reader on side, there is a whole section where Grandma is trying to frighten and terrorise George with her wicked lies and twisted imagination. When George has to give Grandma her medicine he comes up with a plan, to make a concoction of anything and everything he can find with some quite startling results.

I initially heard this story being read to a year 2 class and was struck by how much the children loved the use of adjectives to describe the different ingredients. The children thought the book was hilarious and were eager to hear more every day. I thoroughly enjoyed the story however some people may be wary as it is based on how to poison an evil old woman so this may not be suitable for very young children. Never the less, the detailed description is brilliant.

I think this book would be an excellent example of something parents can read with their children for enjoyment, or a book children could read to their parents if they were particularly confident readers. This book is packed with funny and exciting language and also has some short comical poems. I would recommend this book for parents to read to their children as the constant use of brilliant vocabulary creates an exciting rhythm.

Divide children into groups. Set up a carousel of activities in which children investigate how Roald Dahl skilfully manipulates words to achieve extraordinary effects. Activity one: Children read extract one independently, then invite one or two to read it aloud. Which words rhyme? Is there any rhyming pattern to the poem? Prompt them to notice that it’s written in rhyming couplets. Why do children think Dahl used rhyming couplets? What effect does this have on the reader?

Activity three: Introduce the term ‘onomatopoeia’ if children don’t know it. Ask children to define the word ‘onomatopoeia’. Why do they think Roald Dahl has used onomatopoeia in his poem? Ask children to highlight all the noisy (onomatopoeic) words in extract one, then to write down as many noisy words as they can think of to match the pictures on RESOURCE 2: SOUND SCORCERY.

Invite children to write their own magic medicine poem on RESOURCE 3: MY PERILOUS POTION; they should use what they’ve written on resources one and two to help them.

It seems like it might be easier to take a second baby in stride, but knowing how precious our sweet girl is to us makes me even more grateful for and awestruck by this blessing. It was hard to imagine what our love for a child would feel like before we had June, and certainly how much fun it would be to be a mama — but now I know!! This time around, I’ve loved anticipating all of the good stuff that’s coming (like movement soon!), and it’s been nice to feel a little more prepared for the hard stuff, too.

That being said, keeping my expectations low has been my biggest challenge so far with baby number two. Y’all know how I feel about expectations – I live and die by them, as there are few things that more strongly affect my happiness and overall life satisfaction.

Last time around, pregnancy and life with a newborn was pretty much a gigantic blank slate. Specifically, I never had illusions about how wonderful the newborn phase would be. In fact, I expected it to be hard, frustrating, and exhausting, with a steep learning curve. I wasn’t depressed about this; I just figured it would be something we’d have to get through, and it would get better every day.

Roald Dahl’s George’s Marvellous Medicine is a fantastic read. It follows a boy called George who has to look after his awful Grandma whilst his mum goes out. Dahl’s initial description of George’s Grandma immediately gets the reader on side, there is a whole section where Grandma is trying to frighten and terrorise George with her wicked lies and twisted imagination. When George has to give Grandma her medicine he comes up with a plan, to make a concoction of anything and everything he can find with some quite startling results.

I initially heard this story being read to a year 2 class and was struck by how much the children loved the use of adjectives to describe the different ingredients. The children thought the book was hilarious and were eager to hear more every day. I thoroughly enjoyed the story however some people may be wary as it is based on how to poison an evil old woman so this may not be suitable for very young children. Never the less, the detailed description is brilliant.

I think this book would be an excellent example of something parents can read with their children for enjoyment, or a book children could read to their parents if they were particularly confident readers. This book is packed with funny and exciting language and also has some short comical poems. I would recommend this book for parents to read to their children as the constant use of brilliant vocabulary creates an exciting rhythm.

Divide children into groups. Set up a carousel of activities in which children investigate how Roald Dahl skilfully manipulates words to achieve extraordinary effects. Activity one: Children read extract one independently, then invite one or two to read it aloud. Which words rhyme? Is there any rhyming pattern to the poem? Prompt them to notice that it’s written in rhyming couplets. Why do children think Dahl used rhyming couplets? What effect does this have on the reader?

Activity three: Introduce the term ‘onomatopoeia’ if children don’t know it. Ask children to define the word ‘onomatopoeia’. Why do they think Roald Dahl has used onomatopoeia in his poem? Ask children to highlight all the noisy (onomatopoeic) words in extract one, then to write down as many noisy words as they can think of to match the pictures on RESOURCE 2: SOUND SCORCERY.

Invite children to write their own magic medicine poem on RESOURCE 3: MY PERILOUS POTION; they should use what they’ve written on resources one and two to help them.

George's grandma is a grizzly, grumpy, selfish old woman with pale brown teeth and a small puckered-up mouth like a dog's bottom. Four times a day she takes a large spoonful of thick brown medicine, but it doesn't seem to do her any good. She's always just as horrid after she's taken it as she was before. So when George is left alone to look after her one morning, it's just the chance he needs...

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