Mantle always said after hitting a home run, “I didn’t want to show up the pitcher. I figured he felt bad enough already.”

Mantle played a style of baseball that has disappeared many would agree. He never showboated nor did he look up after hitting a home run. He gave it 100 percent at all times. He was able to think the game as much as he allowed his raw talent to take the Yankees to seven World Series Titles.

Mantle broke his leg in right-center field trying to keep up with playing both right and center field almost simultaneously his rookie year. He started out in right field in his rookie season because

Mantle always said after hitting a home run, “I didn’t want to show up the pitcher. I figured he felt bad enough already.”

Mantle played a style of baseball that has disappeared many would agree. He never showboated nor did he look up after hitting a home run. He gave it 100 percent at all times. He was able to think the game as much as he allowed his raw talent to take the Yankees to seven World Series Titles.

Mantle broke his leg in right-center field trying to keep up with playing both right and center field almost simultaneously his rookie year. He started out in right field in his rookie season because

Mickey Mantle sat alone on the bench in a Yankee Stadium dugout. His spiked shoes were crisscrossed, his back slightly slumped, and he appeared grumpy. It was August of 1960. I later learned that he liked to carouse into the wee hours and that he drank too way too much alcohol, so he was probably hung over.

I was 10 years old as I stood in front of Mantle. My brother's baseball team had won a New York City championship and was rewarded with a three-inning game right before the Yankees played that night. My brother, who was 14, was the shortstop. And I got the plum assignment as batboy while the older guys -- one of whom was Terry Crowley who went onto a 13-year career as a major leaguer -- were on the field playing.

While they were warming up, I was in the dugout working the players for signatures. A baggy pair of baseball pants and an oversized hat draped my scrawny little body. Clutched in my hand was a white Rawlings ball. Number 98, it read, with a cushioned cork center.

Mantle always said after hitting a home run, “I didn’t want to show up the pitcher. I figured he felt bad enough already.”

Mantle played a style of baseball that has disappeared many would agree. He never showboated nor did he look up after hitting a home run. He gave it 100 percent at all times. He was able to think the game as much as he allowed his raw talent to take the Yankees to seven World Series Titles.

Mantle broke his leg in right-center field trying to keep up with playing both right and center field almost simultaneously his rookie year. He started out in right field in his rookie season because

Mickey Mantle sat alone on the bench in a Yankee Stadium dugout. His spiked shoes were crisscrossed, his back slightly slumped, and he appeared grumpy. It was August of 1960. I later learned that he liked to carouse into the wee hours and that he drank too way too much alcohol, so he was probably hung over.

I was 10 years old as I stood in front of Mantle. My brother's baseball team had won a New York City championship and was rewarded with a three-inning game right before the Yankees played that night. My brother, who was 14, was the shortstop. And I got the plum assignment as batboy while the older guys -- one of whom was Terry Crowley who went onto a 13-year career as a major leaguer -- were on the field playing.

While they were warming up, I was in the dugout working the players for signatures. A baggy pair of baseball pants and an oversized hat draped my scrawny little body. Clutched in my hand was a white Rawlings ball. Number 98, it read, with a cushioned cork center.

I’m going to try something called Monument Monday, as a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.

Pedro came in to pitch the 9 th ,  got Rich Rollins to ground out, and struck out Sandy Valdespino and Russ Nixon.  That was my third career win, a 2-1 victory over the Twins, and I’ll always be grateful for Pedro for that and for his friendship.

Friday, August 7: Yankee Stadium, attending Tanyon Sturtze Night to raise funds for a great group, the Pinstripes Sports Dreams Foundation.

Mantle always said after hitting a home run, “I didn’t want to show up the pitcher. I figured he felt bad enough already.”

Mantle played a style of baseball that has disappeared many would agree. He never showboated nor did he look up after hitting a home run. He gave it 100 percent at all times. He was able to think the game as much as he allowed his raw talent to take the Yankees to seven World Series Titles.

Mantle broke his leg in right-center field trying to keep up with playing both right and center field almost simultaneously his rookie year. He started out in right field in his rookie season because

Mickey Mantle sat alone on the bench in a Yankee Stadium dugout. His spiked shoes were crisscrossed, his back slightly slumped, and he appeared grumpy. It was August of 1960. I later learned that he liked to carouse into the wee hours and that he drank too way too much alcohol, so he was probably hung over.

I was 10 years old as I stood in front of Mantle. My brother's baseball team had won a New York City championship and was rewarded with a three-inning game right before the Yankees played that night. My brother, who was 14, was the shortstop. And I got the plum assignment as batboy while the older guys -- one of whom was Terry Crowley who went onto a 13-year career as a major leaguer -- were on the field playing.

While they were warming up, I was in the dugout working the players for signatures. A baggy pair of baseball pants and an oversized hat draped my scrawny little body. Clutched in my hand was a white Rawlings ball. Number 98, it read, with a cushioned cork center.

I’m going to try something called Monument Monday, as a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.

Pedro came in to pitch the 9 th ,  got Rich Rollins to ground out, and struck out Sandy Valdespino and Russ Nixon.  That was my third career win, a 2-1 victory over the Twins, and I’ll always be grateful for Pedro for that and for his friendship.

Friday, August 7: Yankee Stadium, attending Tanyon Sturtze Night to raise funds for a great group, the Pinstripes Sports Dreams Foundation.

After 6 1/2 hours of liver transplant surgery, the legendary Yankee opened his eyes for a moment at 3:30 p.m., groaned and then slipped back into unconsciousness when Dr. Goran Klintmalm, a transplant team member, said: "Hi Mickey. How are you?"

Mantle's dramatic surgery unfolded in the pre-dawn at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas after his condition swiftly deteriorated because of the cancer and hepatitis consuming hs liver.

Doctors would not reveal the identity of Mantle's benefactor, saying only that he provided seven other organs to six other people.

Mickey Mantle: The Magnificent Yankee | Bleacher Report


Mickey Mantle: Photos of the Yankee Legend, 1952-1967.

Posted by 2018 article

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