Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

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Surrounding this small group are hundreds of men and women who have struggled through the snow to meet in the quiet Midlands market town of Nuneaton and march in protest; skinheads chant “I’m England till I die”; football casuals with black hoods pulled over their brows, their faces obscured by masks, make last minute arrangements on their mobile phones; organisers stand unnervingly at the edges, arms behind their backs, silent, statuesque.

Someone shouts “No Surrender to the Taliban” to the tune of “Give Me Joy in My Heart”. Another, clutching a half drunk pint, despite the fact that it’s barely 11am, screams: “We Want Our Country Back” to the tune of ‘La Donna è Mobile’. Every few minutes the crowd break into the EDL’s unofficial anthem, ‘We’re Coming Down the Road’ by a sympathetic punk band called Alex and the Bandits. Nuneaton’s bewildered Saturday morning Christmas shoppers look on confused. Who are these people?

WHEN Islamabad's ambassador to Washington, Husain Haqqani, lectured army officers last month at Pakistan's National Defence University, he asked the assembled colonels whom they regarded as the greatest enemy. A third of them named America—with which Pakistan supposedly has a military alliance.

That alliance was already turbulent before a raid by American special forces killed Osama bin Laden on May 2nd. Now it has gone into a tailspin. It was an embarrassment for Pakistanis that bin Laden was living in northern Pakistan and that the Americans went in to kill him without telling them—and undetected. Now it emerges that Pakistani authorities have arrested several local informers who had watched bin Laden's compound for the CIA ahead of the raid. According to a Pakistani source, the arrests include a former army officer, a doctor who had been with the army medical corps. The army is enraged that the CIA has developed an independent spy network in the country.

The arrests come at a time when America badly wants Pakistani co-operation in killing or capturing the remainder of al-Qaeda in the country—including, presumably, Ayman al-Zawahiri, its new leader. The group is struggling to cope with the death of bin Laden and with the American seizure of huge amounts of information on its workings.

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

Did you know that your web browser is a bit old? Some of the content on this site will not work properly as a result.
Upgrade your browser for a faster, better, and safer web experience.

Surrounding this small group are hundreds of men and women who have struggled through the snow to meet in the quiet Midlands market town of Nuneaton and march in protest; skinheads chant “I’m England till I die”; football casuals with black hoods pulled over their brows, their faces obscured by masks, make last minute arrangements on their mobile phones; organisers stand unnervingly at the edges, arms behind their backs, silent, statuesque.

Someone shouts “No Surrender to the Taliban” to the tune of “Give Me Joy in My Heart”. Another, clutching a half drunk pint, despite the fact that it’s barely 11am, screams: “We Want Our Country Back” to the tune of ‘La Donna è Mobile’. Every few minutes the crowd break into the EDL’s unofficial anthem, ‘We’re Coming Down the Road’ by a sympathetic punk band called Alex and the Bandits. Nuneaton’s bewildered Saturday morning Christmas shoppers look on confused. Who are these people?

The enemy of my enemy is my friend - Wikipedia


My Enemy, My Ally | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Posted by 2018 article

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