Americans especially idealize almost everything about French women, from their alleged inability to age to their universally flawless style, so it can be hard to know which stereotypes are actually true.

INSIDER spoke with Piu Marie Eatwell, the author of the myth-busting books, " They Eat Horses, Don't They? The Truth About The French " and " F Is for France: A Curious Cabinet of French Wonders ," to separate the facts from the fiction.

This sweeping generalization is false, according to Eatwell. Even though obesity rates in France are lower than those in America, these statistics mask regional differences in terms of weight, she said.

Americans especially idealize almost everything about French women, from their alleged inability to age to their universally flawless style, so it can be hard to know which stereotypes are actually true.

INSIDER spoke with Piu Marie Eatwell, the author of the myth-busting books, " They Eat Horses, Don't They? The Truth About The French " and " F Is for France: A Curious Cabinet of French Wonders ," to separate the facts from the fiction.

This sweeping generalization is false, according to Eatwell. Even though obesity rates in France are lower than those in America, these statistics mask regional differences in terms of weight, she said.

Additionally, “women are victims by nature,” female characters in the novel are depicted as victims of divorce, rape, suicide, and natural injustice because of men. “It was because the boys were free that they ruled the world. The went about on motorcycles, they even had their own cars, they went out alone at night, and their bodies were free and clean and clear and their minds were their own, and she hated them (French 20). While women were stuck in the house doing tedious chores, men were able to venture out.

Americans especially idealize almost everything about French women, from their alleged inability to age to their universally flawless style, so it can be hard to know which stereotypes are actually true.

INSIDER spoke with Piu Marie Eatwell, the author of the myth-busting books, " They Eat Horses, Don't They? The Truth About The French " and " F Is for France: A Curious Cabinet of French Wonders ," to separate the facts from the fiction.

This sweeping generalization is false, according to Eatwell. Even though obesity rates in France are lower than those in America, these statistics mask regional differences in terms of weight, she said.

Additionally, “women are victims by nature,” female characters in the novel are depicted as victims of divorce, rape, suicide, and natural injustice because of men. “It was because the boys were free that they ruled the world. The went about on motorcycles, they even had their own cars, they went out alone at night, and their bodies were free and clean and clear and their minds were their own, and she hated them (French 20). While women were stuck in the house doing tedious chores, men were able to venture out.

Before 1789 such ideas fell on deaf ears; the issue of women's rights, unlike the rights of Protestants, Jews, and blacks, did not lead to essay contests, official commissions, or Enlightenment-inspired clubs under the monarchy. In part, this lack of interest followed from the fact that women were not considered a persecuted group like Calvinists, Jews, or slaves.

Although women's property rights and financial independence met with many restrictions under French law and custom, most men and women agreed with Rousseau and other Enlightenment thinkers that women belonged in the private sphere of the home and therefore had no role to play in public affairs. Most of France's female population worked as peasants, shopkeepers, laundresses, and the like, yet women were defined primarily by their sex (and relationship in marriage) and not by their own occupations.

Pictures from the French Revolution - ThoughtCo


History of French - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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