"She argues persuasively that the revival of cities depends on our looking at them in a fresh and sympathetic way. . Along the way, Ms. Wilson also offers a number of shrewd insights into what makes cities magical and fun, despite their vulgarity, rabble, vice and empty corporate plazas."--Karal Ann Marling, "New York Times Book Review

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"She argues persuasively that the revival of cities depends on our looking at them in a fresh and sympathetic way. . Along the way, Ms. Wilson also offers a number of shrewd insights into what makes cities magical and fun, despite their vulgarity, rabble, vice and empty corporate plazas."--Karal Ann Marling, "New York Times Book Review

Si eres el vendedor de este producto, ¿te gustaría sugerir ciertos cambios a través del servicio de atención al vendedor ?

A sphinx is a mythical creature with the body of a lion, most often with a human head and sometimes with wings. The creature was an Egyptian invention and had a male head - human or animal; however, in ancient Greek culture the creature had the head of a woman. The sphinx is also present in the art and sculpture of the Mycenaean, Assyrian, Persian and Phoenician civilizations.  

The sphinx was also commonly represented in both Assyrian and Persian art, usually with wings and a male human head. Large, sculpted sphinxes in the shape of winged bulls often stood in pairs outside palaces and guarded against evil forces. Such an example is the large sphinx presently in the British Museum which once stood outside the palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud (ca 865 BCE). Persian architecture often incorporated sphinxes in low-relief in walls and gates, examples from Susa (6th century BCE) and Persepolis (4th century BCE) depict male-headed sphinxes wearing divine horned headdresses.

Sphinxes also commonly appeared atop funerary stelai and were usually brightly painted. A surviving example from Attica (around 540 BCE) displays traces of paint and would have originally had black hair, wing feathers in green, blue, black and red and breast scales in red and blue. Interestingly, when used in votive offerings the head always faced forwards whilst sphinxes on funerary stelai always faced sideways. A third use of sphinxes, possibly borrowed from Syria or Cyprus, was as decorative support bases for carved stone water basins (perirrhanteria), which were used in sanctuaries.

The Sphinx in the City - Elizabeth Wilson - Paperback.


The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, the Control of.

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