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Utilitarianism is an ethical theory which states that the best action is the one that maximizes utility . "Utility" is defined in various ways, usually in terms of the well-being of sentient entities. Jeremy Bentham , the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of anyone involved in the action. Utilitarianism is a version of consequentialism , which states that the consequences of any action are the only standard of right and wrong. Unlike other forms of consequentialism, such as egoism , utilitarianism considers the interests of all beings equally .

Proponents of utilitarianism have disagreed on a number of points, such as whether actions should be chosen based on their likely results ( act utilitarianism ) or whether agents should conform to rules that maximize utility ( rule utilitarianism ). There is also disagreement as to whether total ( total utilitarianism ) or average ( average utilitarianism ) utility should be maximized.

Though the seeds of the theory can be found in the hedonists Aristippus and Epicurus , who viewed happiness as the only good, the tradition of utilitarianism properly began with Bentham, and has included John Stuart Mill , Henry Sidgwick , R. M. Hare , David Braybrooke , and Peter Singer . It has been applied to social welfare economics, the crisis of global poverty, the ethics of raising animals for food and the importance of avoiding existential risks to humanity.

There are different forms of Utilitarianism, two of which are act-utilitarianism and rule-utilitarianism. ... With these two definitions in mind, we look at the questions: "How does rule-utilitarianism attempt to solve the apparent problems of act-utilitarianism? ... First, I want to discuss some objections that have been noted on both of these forms of utilitarianism. ... This leads in to the idea that this type of utilitarianism is better in theory, rather than in practice. ... In that sense, that's where act-utilitarianism comes in to play. ...

Definition of Utilitarianism Utilitarianism is an ethical theory developed in the modern period by Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) and John Stuart Mill (1806-73) to promote fairness in British legislation during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when the interests of the upper classes tended to prevail and the sufferings of the lower classes were neglected. Utilitarianism is an ethical theory that calls for putting benevolence into action. Mill interprets the term utilitarianism as signifying any moral theory (the terms ethical and moral are used synonymously by Bentham and Mill,) in which...

Mill believes that the proper moral ethics is Utilitarianism... I think that in theory utilitarianism is a good, but it also has its shortcomings... Mill's theory of utilitarianism can be disputed in many ways by many different people, all to which Mill refutes in his own essay Utilitarianism... It is this fact that leads one to believe that utilitarianism can lead to disastrous consequences... I believe that in theory Utilitarianism is a good idea...

Typical of Enlightenment theories, Utilitarianism has a built-in flexibility which allows it to absorb much criticism without being dealt a fatal blow. I will go over some of the classical criticisms and their rebuttals before discussing what I consider to be Utilitarianism’s fatal flaw: its inability to countenance inestimable values.

Whereas Metaethics is focused on the task of defining goodness, Normative Ethics is famously trained on the question: What makes right acts right? The following logical relationships between the concepts of rightness, wrongness, and obligatoriness suffice to extend the import of this question to all three, where p is any act:

Thus, as we directly depend on Utilitarianism to give us the criterion of right action, we extend its domain to the other normative terms as well by means of the above.

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Utilitarianism is an ethical theory which states that the best action is the one that maximizes utility . "Utility" is defined in various ways, usually in terms of the well-being of sentient entities. Jeremy Bentham , the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of anyone involved in the action. Utilitarianism is a version of consequentialism , which states that the consequences of any action are the only standard of right and wrong. Unlike other forms of consequentialism, such as egoism , utilitarianism considers the interests of all beings equally .

Proponents of utilitarianism have disagreed on a number of points, such as whether actions should be chosen based on their likely results ( act utilitarianism ) or whether agents should conform to rules that maximize utility ( rule utilitarianism ). There is also disagreement as to whether total ( total utilitarianism ) or average ( average utilitarianism ) utility should be maximized.

Though the seeds of the theory can be found in the hedonists Aristippus and Epicurus , who viewed happiness as the only good, the tradition of utilitarianism properly began with Bentham, and has included John Stuart Mill , Henry Sidgwick , R. M. Hare , David Braybrooke , and Peter Singer . It has been applied to social welfare economics, the crisis of global poverty, the ethics of raising animals for food and the importance of avoiding existential risks to humanity.

There are different forms of Utilitarianism, two of which are act-utilitarianism and rule-utilitarianism. ... With these two definitions in mind, we look at the questions: "How does rule-utilitarianism attempt to solve the apparent problems of act-utilitarianism? ... First, I want to discuss some objections that have been noted on both of these forms of utilitarianism. ... This leads in to the idea that this type of utilitarianism is better in theory, rather than in practice. ... In that sense, that's where act-utilitarianism comes in to play. ...

Definition of Utilitarianism Utilitarianism is an ethical theory developed in the modern period by Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) and John Stuart Mill (1806-73) to promote fairness in British legislation during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when the interests of the upper classes tended to prevail and the sufferings of the lower classes were neglected. Utilitarianism is an ethical theory that calls for putting benevolence into action. Mill interprets the term utilitarianism as signifying any moral theory (the terms ethical and moral are used synonymously by Bentham and Mill,) in which...

Mill believes that the proper moral ethics is Utilitarianism... I think that in theory utilitarianism is a good, but it also has its shortcomings... Mill's theory of utilitarianism can be disputed in many ways by many different people, all to which Mill refutes in his own essay Utilitarianism... It is this fact that leads one to believe that utilitarianism can lead to disastrous consequences... I believe that in theory Utilitarianism is a good idea...

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

Utilitarianism is an ethical theory which states that the best action is the one that maximizes utility . "Utility" is defined in various ways, usually in terms of the well-being of sentient entities. Jeremy Bentham , the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of anyone involved in the action. Utilitarianism is a version of consequentialism , which states that the consequences of any action are the only standard of right and wrong. Unlike other forms of consequentialism, such as egoism , utilitarianism considers the interests of all beings equally .

Proponents of utilitarianism have disagreed on a number of points, such as whether actions should be chosen based on their likely results ( act utilitarianism ) or whether agents should conform to rules that maximize utility ( rule utilitarianism ). There is also disagreement as to whether total ( total utilitarianism ) or average ( average utilitarianism ) utility should be maximized.

Though the seeds of the theory can be found in the hedonists Aristippus and Epicurus , who viewed happiness as the only good, the tradition of utilitarianism properly began with Bentham, and has included John Stuart Mill , Henry Sidgwick , R. M. Hare , David Braybrooke , and Peter Singer . It has been applied to social welfare economics, the crisis of global poverty, the ethics of raising animals for food and the importance of avoiding existential risks to humanity.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

Utilitarianism with Critical Essays by John Stuart Mill


Utilitarianism - definition of utilitarianism by The Free.

Posted by 2018 article

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