By Car from Melbourne
Take the Calder Freeway to Woodend, and then following the signs to Hanging Rock. Or take the Tullamarine Freeway to Romsey and turn left into Woodend Road. 

By Train
From Southern Cross, take the train to Woodend Station and take the bus to the racecourse. Shuttle bus cost $5 return trip. Please refer to individual event days to see a copy of the Shuttle bus timetable.

Peter Weir's haunting mystery about a party of schoolgirls who go missing without a trace in the early 1900s became a critical and box office success long before The Blair Witch Project

Of the many challenges Peter Weir faced when bringing Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel Picnic at Hanging Rock to the big screen, perhaps the greatest was making a dramatically satisfying film about an unresolved mystery. Weir achieved that and then some. Infused with a dark and recondite beauty, his superb 1975 adaptation has played a huge role in sustaining the legend of Lindsay's story about a group of female private school students who vanish at the eponymous Victorian location in the early 1900s.

It has been remembered, celebrated and misunderstood since readers first turned the pages of Lindsay's book four and a half decades ago. To this day great uncertainty remains about its veracity. Were some events true and others not? Was the central premise real or invented? Did anyone actually go missing?

The rolling hills and valleys of the Macedon Ranges are a treasure trove filled with some of Victoria’s best food and wine.

Hanging Rock has fitted in so much over 6 million years… from a sacred place for local indigenous people and backdrop to Joan Lindsay’s book Picnic at Hanging Rock and Peter Weir’s film of the same title, to a colourful host of music concerts, markets and popular horse races, the Rock tells many tales about the history of the Macedon Ranges.

Hanging Rock , or Mount Diogenes as it’s also known, is a rare volcanic formation near the townships of Woodend and Mount Macedon. One of the best examples of a volcanic plug or mamelon in the world, it has been exposed to considerable weathering and erosion, resulting in a conglomeration of unusual rock formations.

Picnic at Hanging Rock / has haunted the Australian psyche for over a century. One summer’s day in 1 three schoolgirls and a teacher inexplicably vanished, never to be seen again. The trip was supposed to be a Saint Valentine’s Day treat. They were supposed to be home for dinner.

In Tom Wright’s chilling adaptation of Joan Lindsay’s classic novel, five performers will struggle to solve the mystery of the missing girls and their teacher. Euphoria and terror will reverberate throughout Appleyard College, as the potential for history to repeat itself becomes nightmarishly real.

*** Please note this performance has a strict latecomers policy. Patrons will NOT be admitted into the theatre after 12 minutes into the performance. Toilet goers can only be readmitted to the theatre at a suitable time on the circle and balcony levels and may be moved to an alternative seat.  We kindly remind you to arrive with time to collect your tickets and take your seat.

By Car from Melbourne
Take the Calder Freeway to Woodend, and then following the signs to Hanging Rock. Or take the Tullamarine Freeway to Romsey and turn left into Woodend Road. 

By Train
From Southern Cross, take the train to Woodend Station and take the bus to the racecourse. Shuttle bus cost $5 return trip. Please refer to individual event days to see a copy of the Shuttle bus timetable.

Peter Weir's haunting mystery about a party of schoolgirls who go missing without a trace in the early 1900s became a critical and box office success long before The Blair Witch Project

Of the many challenges Peter Weir faced when bringing Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel Picnic at Hanging Rock to the big screen, perhaps the greatest was making a dramatically satisfying film about an unresolved mystery. Weir achieved that and then some. Infused with a dark and recondite beauty, his superb 1975 adaptation has played a huge role in sustaining the legend of Lindsay's story about a group of female private school students who vanish at the eponymous Victorian location in the early 1900s.

It has been remembered, celebrated and misunderstood since readers first turned the pages of Lindsay's book four and a half decades ago. To this day great uncertainty remains about its veracity. Were some events true and others not? Was the central premise real or invented? Did anyone actually go missing?

By Car from Melbourne
Take the Calder Freeway to Woodend, and then following the signs to Hanging Rock. Or take the Tullamarine Freeway to Romsey and turn left into Woodend Road. 

By Train
From Southern Cross, take the train to Woodend Station and take the bus to the racecourse. Shuttle bus cost $5 return trip. Please refer to individual event days to see a copy of the Shuttle bus timetable.

By Car from Melbourne
Take the Calder Freeway to Woodend, and then following the signs to Hanging Rock. Or take the Tullamarine Freeway to Romsey and turn left into Woodend Road. 

By Train
From Southern Cross, take the train to Woodend Station and take the bus to the racecourse. Shuttle bus cost $5 return trip. Please refer to individual event days to see a copy of the Shuttle bus timetable.

Peter Weir's haunting mystery about a party of schoolgirls who go missing without a trace in the early 1900s became a critical and box office success long before The Blair Witch Project

Of the many challenges Peter Weir faced when bringing Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel Picnic at Hanging Rock to the big screen, perhaps the greatest was making a dramatically satisfying film about an unresolved mystery. Weir achieved that and then some. Infused with a dark and recondite beauty, his superb 1975 adaptation has played a huge role in sustaining the legend of Lindsay's story about a group of female private school students who vanish at the eponymous Victorian location in the early 1900s.

It has been remembered, celebrated and misunderstood since readers first turned the pages of Lindsay's book four and a half decades ago. To this day great uncertainty remains about its veracity. Were some events true and others not? Was the central premise real or invented? Did anyone actually go missing?

The rolling hills and valleys of the Macedon Ranges are a treasure trove filled with some of Victoria’s best food and wine.

Hanging Rock has fitted in so much over 6 million years… from a sacred place for local indigenous people and backdrop to Joan Lindsay’s book Picnic at Hanging Rock and Peter Weir’s film of the same title, to a colourful host of music concerts, markets and popular horse races, the Rock tells many tales about the history of the Macedon Ranges.

Hanging Rock , or Mount Diogenes as it’s also known, is a rare volcanic formation near the townships of Woodend and Mount Macedon. One of the best examples of a volcanic plug or mamelon in the world, it has been exposed to considerable weathering and erosion, resulting in a conglomeration of unusual rock formations.

Picnic at Hanging Rock - Wikipedia


Picnic at Hanging Rock (novel) - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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