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What Itsi claims to have invented is the interactive experience of walking through a haunted house while being assaulted by scary actors amid frightful tableaux.

“It is theater in reverse,” he said. “In theater, you stay in the chairs and the scenery moves in front of you. In my theater, you move through the house and the scenery stays permanent.”

Itsi grew up in Wheaton, Md., and studied theater at St. Mary’s College and East Tennessee State. In 1971, he was a 24-year-old elementary school teacher in Southern Maryland. He’d also taken a job with St. Mary’s County’s recreation department. “I didn’t know anything about sports — just music, arts and culture,” Itsi explained. “I said, ‘Let me handle fundraising. Let’s do a haunted house.’ ”

A haunted house or ghosthouse is a house or other building often perceived as being inhabited by disembodied spirits of the deceased who may have been former residents or were familiar with the property. Parapsychologists attribute haunting to the spirits of the dead and the effect of violent or tragic events in the building's past such as murder, accidental death, or suicide . [1] More scientific explanations for the perception that a house is haunted include misinterpreting noises naturally present in structures, waking dreams, suggestibility, and the effect of toxic substances in environments that can cause hallucinations.

In a 2005, Gallup poll , 37 percent of Americans, 28 percent of Canadians, and 40 percent of Britons expressed the belief that houses could be "haunted". [2] [3]

According to science writer Terence Hines , cold spots, creaking sounds, and odd noises are typically present in any home, especially older ones, and "such noises can easily be mistaken for the sound of footsteps by those inclined to imagine the presence of a deceased tenant in their home." [4]

We've all been there before: Dressed up in costumes, ringing the doorbell expecting candy before a multidimensional demon opens the door and devours our souls. Here're some of our favorite Haunted Houses ... just so you know which ones to avoid.

Hell House
Here's the first clue that you might not want to go to a particular house looking for treats: If it's called the Hell House . Okay, to be fair, in Richard Matheson's 1971 novel, the house is actually called the Belasco House, but even in the book that should be a clue, considering it was named after a man who performed unspeakable acts of "blasphemy and perversion" in it. Turns out that it wasn't necessarily Ernesto Belasco's fault, though; the house itself corrupts and feeds upon the weaknesses of all who enter. Which is to say: Don't count on candy.

House
No, I'm not getting forgetful in my old age; this 2006 novel shares a name only with the 1986 movie - Well, that and the idea of a Haunted House. But in this "Christian Horror" novel, there's one easy out from this (and any) terror abode: Sacrifice that impresses Jesus. Quite how much he'd be impressed with trick or treating - or the whole Halloween concept in general, for that matter - is open to question, however, so I wouldn't ring that doorbell thinking you've got an easy out, if I were you.

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What Itsi claims to have invented is the interactive experience of walking through a haunted house while being assaulted by scary actors amid frightful tableaux.

“It is theater in reverse,” he said. “In theater, you stay in the chairs and the scenery moves in front of you. In my theater, you move through the house and the scenery stays permanent.”

Itsi grew up in Wheaton, Md., and studied theater at St. Mary’s College and East Tennessee State. In 1971, he was a 24-year-old elementary school teacher in Southern Maryland. He’d also taken a job with St. Mary’s County’s recreation department. “I didn’t know anything about sports — just music, arts and culture,” Itsi explained. “I said, ‘Let me handle fundraising. Let’s do a haunted house.’ ”

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What Itsi claims to have invented is the interactive experience of walking through a haunted house while being assaulted by scary actors amid frightful tableaux.

“It is theater in reverse,” he said. “In theater, you stay in the chairs and the scenery moves in front of you. In my theater, you move through the house and the scenery stays permanent.”

Itsi grew up in Wheaton, Md., and studied theater at St. Mary’s College and East Tennessee State. In 1971, he was a 24-year-old elementary school teacher in Southern Maryland. He’d also taken a job with St. Mary’s County’s recreation department. “I didn’t know anything about sports — just music, arts and culture,” Itsi explained. “I said, ‘Let me handle fundraising. Let’s do a haunted house.’ ”

A haunted house or ghosthouse is a house or other building often perceived as being inhabited by disembodied spirits of the deceased who may have been former residents or were familiar with the property. Parapsychologists attribute haunting to the spirits of the dead and the effect of violent or tragic events in the building's past such as murder, accidental death, or suicide . [1] More scientific explanations for the perception that a house is haunted include misinterpreting noises naturally present in structures, waking dreams, suggestibility, and the effect of toxic substances in environments that can cause hallucinations.

In a 2005, Gallup poll , 37 percent of Americans, 28 percent of Canadians, and 40 percent of Britons expressed the belief that houses could be "haunted". [2] [3]

According to science writer Terence Hines , cold spots, creaking sounds, and odd noises are typically present in any home, especially older ones, and "such noises can easily be mistaken for the sound of footsteps by those inclined to imagine the presence of a deceased tenant in their home." [4]

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The Scariest Modern-Day Haunted Houses - io9


Andy Goes to a Haunted House with Eric Stonestreet - YouTube

Posted by 2018 article

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