PHM has been working with Scope to collect campaigning material relating to the campaign for the Disability Discrimination Act. Here their Campaign Officer, Tom Hayes, writes about the success of the project so far.

Nelson Mandela is known the world over for his impressive fight against racial segregation in South Africa.  Helped by a recent blockbuster film, Britain’s women’s suffrage movement is better known among people today. Whether projected onto big screens or taught in classrooms, similar civil rights fights from Selma to Stonewall are well-known.

Other equality campaigns have been wholly forgotten, however. Twenty years ago this month, Parliament finally passed a law to ban discrimination against disabled people. This change would never have happened without the fierce campaigning of disabled people.



To the outside observer, the art world can seem impenetrable, a baffling combination of commerce, ideas and aesthetics detached from the everyday world. And for many, the art it trades in is just as perplexing, something strange and frightening that they are unable to understand.

And to be fair, the art world did gain a reputation for excess and lurid sensationalism during the heyday of postmodernism some 20 years ago, a period when convoluted academic theories ruled and artists being provocative and obscure was what mattered. Audiences were often left hopelessly adrift, and feeling rather hoodwinked.

But fortunately art isn’t what it used to be. Contemporary art has matured well past this phase to achieve a new sophistication and relevance that is proving appealing to private collectors. Collecting art is a uniquely rewarding experience that not only yields intellectual, social and perhaps financial dividends over years, but realises a desire to be involved in an exuberant industry. And those who collect contemporary art in particular, are people who move with the times and appreciate what’s interesting and new.


Art Bookstore
Scroll through a selection new books in our art bookstore. We've made a selection of recommended art books published over the past two years. You'll also find a selection of art magazines dealing with the world of art.

Art-Collecting.com can also serve as your shopping portal to Amazon.com for all your other Internet shopping - whether for laptops or luggage, cameras, heels, or haberdashery. Just click here: Path to Amazon.
 

               
    
             

             


Amazon's Book of the Month Site for reading ideas and gift suggestions.  

Thanks for visiting Art-Collecting.com.

Here at Art-Collecting.com, we love art as much as you do. Please mention us to your friends, to galleries you visit, and feel free to share the site via Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, or other Social Media venues!
 

PHM has been working with Scope to collect campaigning material relating to the campaign for the Disability Discrimination Act. Here their Campaign Officer, Tom Hayes, writes about the success of the project so far.

Nelson Mandela is known the world over for his impressive fight against racial segregation in South Africa.  Helped by a recent blockbuster film, Britain’s women’s suffrage movement is better known among people today. Whether projected onto big screens or taught in classrooms, similar civil rights fights from Selma to Stonewall are well-known.

Other equality campaigns have been wholly forgotten, however. Twenty years ago this month, Parliament finally passed a law to ban discrimination against disabled people. This change would never have happened without the fierce campaigning of disabled people.



To the outside observer, the art world can seem impenetrable, a baffling combination of commerce, ideas and aesthetics detached from the everyday world. And for many, the art it trades in is just as perplexing, something strange and frightening that they are unable to understand.

And to be fair, the art world did gain a reputation for excess and lurid sensationalism during the heyday of postmodernism some 20 years ago, a period when convoluted academic theories ruled and artists being provocative and obscure was what mattered. Audiences were often left hopelessly adrift, and feeling rather hoodwinked.

But fortunately art isn’t what it used to be. Contemporary art has matured well past this phase to achieve a new sophistication and relevance that is proving appealing to private collectors. Collecting art is a uniquely rewarding experience that not only yields intellectual, social and perhaps financial dividends over years, but realises a desire to be involved in an exuberant industry. And those who collect contemporary art in particular, are people who move with the times and appreciate what’s interesting and new.


Art Bookstore
Scroll through a selection new books in our art bookstore. We've made a selection of recommended art books published over the past two years. You'll also find a selection of art magazines dealing with the world of art.

Art-Collecting.com can also serve as your shopping portal to Amazon.com for all your other Internet shopping - whether for laptops or luggage, cameras, heels, or haberdashery. Just click here: Path to Amazon.
 

               
    
             

             


Amazon's Book of the Month Site for reading ideas and gift suggestions.  

Thanks for visiting Art-Collecting.com.

Here at Art-Collecting.com, we love art as much as you do. Please mention us to your friends, to galleries you visit, and feel free to share the site via Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, or other Social Media venues!
 

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

PHM has been working with Scope to collect campaigning material relating to the campaign for the Disability Discrimination Act. Here their Campaign Officer, Tom Hayes, writes about the success of the project so far.

Nelson Mandela is known the world over for his impressive fight against racial segregation in South Africa.  Helped by a recent blockbuster film, Britain’s women’s suffrage movement is better known among people today. Whether projected onto big screens or taught in classrooms, similar civil rights fights from Selma to Stonewall are well-known.

Other equality campaigns have been wholly forgotten, however. Twenty years ago this month, Parliament finally passed a law to ban discrimination against disabled people. This change would never have happened without the fierce campaigning of disabled people.



To the outside observer, the art world can seem impenetrable, a baffling combination of commerce, ideas and aesthetics detached from the everyday world. And for many, the art it trades in is just as perplexing, something strange and frightening that they are unable to understand.

And to be fair, the art world did gain a reputation for excess and lurid sensationalism during the heyday of postmodernism some 20 years ago, a period when convoluted academic theories ruled and artists being provocative and obscure was what mattered. Audiences were often left hopelessly adrift, and feeling rather hoodwinked.

But fortunately art isn’t what it used to be. Contemporary art has matured well past this phase to achieve a new sophistication and relevance that is proving appealing to private collectors. Collecting art is a uniquely rewarding experience that not only yields intellectual, social and perhaps financial dividends over years, but realises a desire to be involved in an exuberant industry. And those who collect contemporary art in particular, are people who move with the times and appreciate what’s interesting and new.

PHM has been working with Scope to collect campaigning material relating to the campaign for the Disability Discrimination Act. Here their Campaign Officer, Tom Hayes, writes about the success of the project so far.

Nelson Mandela is known the world over for his impressive fight against racial segregation in South Africa.  Helped by a recent blockbuster film, Britain’s women’s suffrage movement is better known among people today. Whether projected onto big screens or taught in classrooms, similar civil rights fights from Selma to Stonewall are well-known.

Other equality campaigns have been wholly forgotten, however. Twenty years ago this month, Parliament finally passed a law to ban discrimination against disabled people. This change would never have happened without the fierce campaigning of disabled people.

PHM has been working with Scope to collect campaigning material relating to the campaign for the Disability Discrimination Act. Here their Campaign Officer, Tom Hayes, writes about the success of the project so far.

Nelson Mandela is known the world over for his impressive fight against racial segregation in South Africa.  Helped by a recent blockbuster film, Britain’s women’s suffrage movement is better known among people today. Whether projected onto big screens or taught in classrooms, similar civil rights fights from Selma to Stonewall are well-known.

Other equality campaigns have been wholly forgotten, however. Twenty years ago this month, Parliament finally passed a law to ban discrimination against disabled people. This change would never have happened without the fierce campaigning of disabled people.



To the outside observer, the art world can seem impenetrable, a baffling combination of commerce, ideas and aesthetics detached from the everyday world. And for many, the art it trades in is just as perplexing, something strange and frightening that they are unable to understand.

And to be fair, the art world did gain a reputation for excess and lurid sensationalism during the heyday of postmodernism some 20 years ago, a period when convoluted academic theories ruled and artists being provocative and obscure was what mattered. Audiences were often left hopelessly adrift, and feeling rather hoodwinked.

But fortunately art isn’t what it used to be. Contemporary art has matured well past this phase to achieve a new sophistication and relevance that is proving appealing to private collectors. Collecting art is a uniquely rewarding experience that not only yields intellectual, social and perhaps financial dividends over years, but realises a desire to be involved in an exuberant industry. And those who collect contemporary art in particular, are people who move with the times and appreciate what’s interesting and new.


Art Bookstore
Scroll through a selection new books in our art bookstore. We've made a selection of recommended art books published over the past two years. You'll also find a selection of art magazines dealing with the world of art.

Art-Collecting.com can also serve as your shopping portal to Amazon.com for all your other Internet shopping - whether for laptops or luggage, cameras, heels, or haberdashery. Just click here: Path to Amazon.
 

               
    
             

             


Amazon's Book of the Month Site for reading ideas and gift suggestions.  

Thanks for visiting Art-Collecting.com.

Here at Art-Collecting.com, we love art as much as you do. Please mention us to your friends, to galleries you visit, and feel free to share the site via Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, or other Social Media venues!
 

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Recently I found these 1980s milk bottles at a collectors fair. The dealer had about 20 bottles with no two designs the same, with difficultly I restrained myself and only bought 3 of them.

With my curator head on I justified buying three of them by looking at them a kind of social document. Surely the shopping list bottle gives you an idea of food items that might be considered essential in the 1980s? But it’s the Blue Riband bottle that reveals the real reason I bought them.

It’s because they also give me a little bit of a warm fuzzy glow. They remind me of reading the back of the cereal box before I went to school, saying hello to the milkman, and having Blue Riband biscuits in my lunchbox.* So before I start wallowing, let’s have a look and see how museums encourage and stimulate nostalgia.

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