While discussion of women and sex is never far from the headlines, what do we really know about female desire? What -as the famous question goes - does a woman want? A new book, conceived as an update to Nancy Friday's seminal My Secret Garden , seeks to probe that very question.

Garden of Desires , written by Emily Dubberley , explores the breadth of women's fantasies. It asks the question of what has changed since the 1970s when My Secret Garden was first published. Incorporating research into the origins of fantasies as well as extensive interviews with women, it lays bare the depth and breadth of women's sexual imagination.

At the time was My Secret Garden was published, people were surprised by the extent of women's fantasies. It may be hard to imagine now, but back in 1973 many people thought women didn't have sexual fantasies at all. In the same month as My Secret Garden ’s release, Cosmo ran a feature with the opening line: “Women do not have sexual fantasies, period. Men do.”

Although I already covered the topic of male fantasies in a previous post, I received several requests for a more comprehensive list. So, always happy to oblige, I scoured the Internet for research on the matter and alienated a few friends with inappropriate questions. Below are the results.

The reasons for this fantasy are quite diverse. Some of the men who fantasize about this simply enjoy the thought of pleasuring a woman in ways that are physically impossible for a single man (at the same time, anyway), others are turned on by the element of humiliation to themselves it can contain, and yet others get excited over the element of submission on the woman’s side that might be implied. All these different fantasies combined make this one of the more popular themes.

The combination of being taboo and involving others is what makes this fantasy a turn-on for quite a few men. Forbidden fruit is always attractive, especially when it comes to sex. When the chance of showing off ones sexual prowess to the world is added to that, it becomes an irresistible fantasy for many.

While discussion of women and sex is never far from the headlines, what do we really know about female desire? What -as the famous question goes - does a woman want? A new book, conceived as an update to Nancy Friday's seminal My Secret Garden , seeks to probe that very question.

Garden of Desires , written by Emily Dubberley , explores the breadth of women's fantasies. It asks the question of what has changed since the 1970s when My Secret Garden was first published. Incorporating research into the origins of fantasies as well as extensive interviews with women, it lays bare the depth and breadth of women's sexual imagination.

At the time was My Secret Garden was published, people were surprised by the extent of women's fantasies. It may be hard to imagine now, but back in 1973 many people thought women didn't have sexual fantasies at all. In the same month as My Secret Garden ’s release, Cosmo ran a feature with the opening line: “Women do not have sexual fantasies, period. Men do.”

Although I already covered the topic of male fantasies in a previous post, I received several requests for a more comprehensive list. So, always happy to oblige, I scoured the Internet for research on the matter and alienated a few friends with inappropriate questions. Below are the results.

The reasons for this fantasy are quite diverse. Some of the men who fantasize about this simply enjoy the thought of pleasuring a woman in ways that are physically impossible for a single man (at the same time, anyway), others are turned on by the element of humiliation to themselves it can contain, and yet others get excited over the element of submission on the woman’s side that might be implied. All these different fantasies combined make this one of the more popular themes.

The combination of being taboo and involving others is what makes this fantasy a turn-on for quite a few men. Forbidden fruit is always attractive, especially when it comes to sex. When the chance of showing off ones sexual prowess to the world is added to that, it becomes an irresistible fantasy for many.

En español │As guys get older, one thing doesn't change: That is their ability to enjoy erotic pleasure. But other aspects of lovemaking become considerably different in the 50-plus years: Sex is a form of exercise, and what once felt like football and basketball now seems more like hiking and golf. It becomes less like the Fourth of July, and more like Thanksgiving. But even without fireworks, the erotic flames can still burn hot and bright — if older men adjust gracefully to the changes aging brings. Here are five things you need to know:

1. Some things change. Take, for example, erections. After 40 and certainly by 50, they rise more slowly, and become less firm and frequent. Sexual fantasies are no longer enough. Men need fondling, often for quite a while. It's disconcerting to lose firmness and suffer wilting from minor distractions, such as a phone ringing, but these changes are perfectly normal. Unfortunately, many men mistake them for erectile dysfunction (ED) and become distraught — only exacerbating the problem. Anxiety constricts the arteries that carry blood into the penis, making erections even less likely.

In addition, many medical conditions impair erections: obesity, diabetes , heart disease, high cholesterol and high blood pressure .

While discussion of women and sex is never far from the headlines, what do we really know about female desire? What -as the famous question goes - does a woman want? A new book, conceived as an update to Nancy Friday's seminal My Secret Garden , seeks to probe that very question.

Garden of Desires , written by Emily Dubberley , explores the breadth of women's fantasies. It asks the question of what has changed since the 1970s when My Secret Garden was first published. Incorporating research into the origins of fantasies as well as extensive interviews with women, it lays bare the depth and breadth of women's sexual imagination.

At the time was My Secret Garden was published, people were surprised by the extent of women's fantasies. It may be hard to imagine now, but back in 1973 many people thought women didn't have sexual fantasies at all. In the same month as My Secret Garden ’s release, Cosmo ran a feature with the opening line: “Women do not have sexual fantasies, period. Men do.”

Top 10 Female Sex Fantasies - AskMen


Fantasies for 50 Year Olds: Herbert I. Kavet.

Posted by 2018 article