" There ain't no such thing as a free lunch " (alternatively, " There is no such thing as a free lunch " or other variants) is a popular adage communicating the idea that it is impossible to get something for nothing. The acronyms TANSTAAFL , TINSTAAFL , and TNSTAAFL , are also used. Uses of the phrase dating back to the 1930s and 1940s have been found, but the phrase's first appearance is unknown. [1] The "free lunch" in the saying refers to the nineteenth-century practice in American bars of offering a " free lunch " in order to entice drinking customers.

The phrase and the acronym are central to Robert Heinlein's 1966 science-fiction novel The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress , which helped popularize it. [2] [3] The free-market economist Milton Friedman also popularized the phrase [1] by using it as the title of a 1975 book, [4] and it is used in economics literature to describe opportunity cost . [5] Campbell McConnell writes that the idea is "at the core of economics". [6]

The "free lunch" refers to the once-common tradition of saloons in the United States providing a "free" lunch to patrons who had purchased at least one drink. Many foods on offer were high in salt (e.g., ham, cheese, and salted crackers), so those who ate them ended up buying a lot of beer. Rudyard Kipling , writing in 1891, noted how he

" There ain't no such thing as a free lunch " (alternatively, " There is no such thing as a free lunch " or other variants) is a popular adage communicating the idea that it is impossible to get something for nothing. The acronyms TANSTAAFL , TINSTAAFL , and TNSTAAFL , are also used. Uses of the phrase dating back to the 1930s and 1940s have been found, but the phrase's first appearance is unknown. [1] The "free lunch" in the saying refers to the nineteenth-century practice in American bars of offering a " free lunch " in order to entice drinking customers.

The phrase and the acronym are central to Robert Heinlein's 1966 science-fiction novel The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress , which helped popularize it. [2] [3] The free-market economist Milton Friedman also popularized the phrase [1] by using it as the title of a 1975 book, [4] and it is used in economics literature to describe opportunity cost . [5] Campbell McConnell writes that the idea is "at the core of economics". [6]

The "free lunch" refers to the once-common tradition of saloons in the United States providing a "free" lunch to patrons who had purchased at least one drink. Many foods on offer were high in salt (e.g., ham, cheese, and salted crackers), so those who ate them ended up buying a lot of beer. Rudyard Kipling , writing in 1891, noted how he

If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form , found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html , or at any USDA office, or call (866)632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at [email protected] .

Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339 ; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish).

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There ain t no such thing as a free lunch - Wikipedia

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