But if from some angles Merivel looks like a sequel that can't live up to the novel it succeeds, it is also clever and touching. This is because it is continually and intelligently self-conscious about being a sequel. Its characters seem always to be following patterns from the past. The most extreme example is Merivel's wife, who has gone mad and spends her days following embroidery patterns over and over again.

Merivel is himself compelled to re-enact the past in new forms: when he cuts out the cancer from his former mistress he recalls cutting his daughter from her mother's stomach. Repeatedly (and sometimes rather clunkily), he reminds us of things that he has done before in Restoration , the dog-eared manuscript of which, adorned with mouse-droppings, is discovered beneath his bed and renamed "The Wedge". As he says, when about to be forced into a second less-than-desirable marriage, "I want to say that this already happened to me long ago."

All of this means that Merivel , which begs to be described as a "merry romp", is actually a more unusual thing: a melancholy romp. Merivel says to his old mistress, "We are all dying, Violet." She, fresh from a romp with Charles II, replies "but now that I have been fucked by the king, I can die happy. Is this not so?" This note of forced gaiety is very much that of the novel. It is about late middle age as a period in which people strive to reanimate themselves by memories of what they were, but in which they end up being caught by their own characteristic compulsions and finally by their own mortality.

But if from some angles Merivel looks like a sequel that can't live up to the novel it succeeds, it is also clever and touching. This is because it is continually and intelligently self-conscious about being a sequel. Its characters seem always to be following patterns from the past. The most extreme example is Merivel's wife, who has gone mad and spends her days following embroidery patterns over and over again.

Merivel is himself compelled to re-enact the past in new forms: when he cuts out the cancer from his former mistress he recalls cutting his daughter from her mother's stomach. Repeatedly (and sometimes rather clunkily), he reminds us of things that he has done before in Restoration , the dog-eared manuscript of which, adorned with mouse-droppings, is discovered beneath his bed and renamed "The Wedge". As he says, when about to be forced into a second less-than-desirable marriage, "I want to say that this already happened to me long ago."

All of this means that Merivel , which begs to be described as a "merry romp", is actually a more unusual thing: a melancholy romp. Merivel says to his old mistress, "We are all dying, Violet." She, fresh from a romp with Charles II, replies "but now that I have been fucked by the king, I can die happy. Is this not so?" This note of forced gaiety is very much that of the novel. It is about late middle age as a period in which people strive to reanimate themselves by memories of what they were, but in which they end up being caught by their own characteristic compulsions and finally by their own mortality.

by Carla Johnson I’ve been watching the backlash to Pepsi’s Kendall Jenner ad. According to data from Amobee Brand Intelligence, digital content engagement around Pepsi has increased significantly (366 percent in just a day), but 43 percent has mentioned Black Lives Matter, 31 percent has labeled the ad as “tone-deaf” and 10 percent has tagged […]

B2B marketers are finally getting a handle on some big digital challenges. That’s the message from DemandWave’s recently released 2017 State of B2B Digital Marketing. The research shows that the quality of sales leads is marketers’ top priority. That ousted last year’s biggest hurdle of measuring and proving ROI. Perhaps one of the reasons for […]

Elliot was a good husband and father. Then he began to complain of headaches and seemed to lose his concentration and sense of responsibility. He took a battery of psychological tests, but they showed nothing. Elliot was coherent and smart with a near flawless memory. He was referred to Antonio Damasio, head of neurology at […]

The Robert Rose Book of Classic Pasta - Publishers Weekly


Robert Rose

Posted by 2018 article

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