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Archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site of Naukratis that today are dispersed in museums worldwide.

Surviving papyri from a 13th Dynasty tomb at Luxor later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

Ben, our 16-year-old, regularly evokes what we call his “Catalogue of Grievances.” Picture the Sears Wishbook, but mental, and, you know, the opposite: a ledger of all the perceived wrongs he’s endured at our cruel or hapless hands. He loves to reminisce about them, flipping the book open at a seemingly random page to rehearse his injuries or shame, poking at it the way you might tongue a sore gum to reassure yourself that it still hurts. Or maybe more like the way you crack your knuckles—a kind of satisfyingly dramatic pop and stretch that doesn’t actually hurt. Or maybe more like gallows humor. The fact that I’m not sure which of these it is may turn out to be significant.

“Tell me some of your classic grievances,” I say now, because I’m writing about them, even though it’s a school morning and he’s trying to spread cream cheese on a bagel before it cools.

“Let me think,” he says patiently. “I mean, once they’re flowing, they’re really flowing. But sometimes it can be hard to get them started. I mean, besides, like, the obvious.”

A library catalog or library catalogue is a register of all bibliographic items found in a library or group of libraries, such as a network of libraries at several locations. A bibliographic item can be any information entity (e.g., books, computer files, graphics, realia , cartographic materials, etc.) that is considered library material (e.g., a single novel in an anthology ), or a group of library materials (e.g., a trilogy ), or linked from the catalog (e.g., a webpage) as far as it is relevant to the catalog and to the users (patrons) of the library.

The card catalog was a familiar sight to library users for generations, but it has been effectively replaced by the online public access catalog (OPAC). Some still refer to the online catalog as a "card catalog". Some libraries with OPAC access still have card catalogs on site, but these are now strictly a secondary resource and are seldom updated. Many libraries that retain their physical card catalog will post a sign advising the last year that the card catalog was updated. Some libraries have eliminated their card catalog in favour of the OPAC for the purpose of saving space for other use, such as additional shelving.

The largest library catalog in the world is the WorldCat.org union catalog managed by the non-profit library cooperative OCLC , based in Dublin, Ohio . In January 2016, WorldCat.org had over 360,000,000 catalog records and over 2 billion library holdings. [1]

This Catalogue of the Craneflies of the World (CCW) covers all 17999 genus-group and species-group taxa of the families Pediciidae, Limoniidae, Cylindrotomidae, and Tipulidae (Insecta, Diptera, Tipuloidea). Its author is Pjotr Oosterbroek, staffmember of the former Zoological museum of the University of Amsterdam, associate staffmember of NCB-Naturalis, Leiden (see the Manual for contact information).

Apart from the standard taxonomic information (family, subfamily, genus, subgenus, species, subspecies, author, year, publication, synonyms, original genus, original spelling), the catalogue includes up to date information on the distribution of the species by countries and, for the larger countries (e.g., USA, China), provinces, states, or islands. For almost all information that differs from what is found in the regional printed catalogues the reference is given. The CCW furthermore includes reference to all relevant information and figures published by C.P. Alexander and others (see the Manual ).

For a quick search, please go to the Search page and enter a scientific name or country to search for. For more search options, select Advanced search . In the search results, empty fields are not displayed. Relevant cranefly literature can be searched for under Literature . The Manual in detail explains the background of the CCW and lists the abbreviations used in the search results. Database information such as the number of taxa included per family and the last update is listed under Statistics .

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

The British Museum uses cookies to ensure you have the best browsing experience and to help us improve the site.
By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. (Last updated: 12 January 2017) Find out more

Archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site of Naukratis that today are dispersed in museums worldwide.

Surviving papyri from a 13th Dynasty tomb at Luxor later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

Ben, our 16-year-old, regularly evokes what we call his “Catalogue of Grievances.” Picture the Sears Wishbook, but mental, and, you know, the opposite: a ledger of all the perceived wrongs he’s endured at our cruel or hapless hands. He loves to reminisce about them, flipping the book open at a seemingly random page to rehearse his injuries or shame, poking at it the way you might tongue a sore gum to reassure yourself that it still hurts. Or maybe more like the way you crack your knuckles—a kind of satisfyingly dramatic pop and stretch that doesn’t actually hurt. Or maybe more like gallows humor. The fact that I’m not sure which of these it is may turn out to be significant.

“Tell me some of your classic grievances,” I say now, because I’m writing about them, even though it’s a school morning and he’s trying to spread cream cheese on a bagel before it cools.

“Let me think,” he says patiently. “I mean, once they’re flowing, they’re really flowing. But sometimes it can be hard to get them started. I mean, besides, like, the obvious.”

A library catalog or library catalogue is a register of all bibliographic items found in a library or group of libraries, such as a network of libraries at several locations. A bibliographic item can be any information entity (e.g., books, computer files, graphics, realia , cartographic materials, etc.) that is considered library material (e.g., a single novel in an anthology ), or a group of library materials (e.g., a trilogy ), or linked from the catalog (e.g., a webpage) as far as it is relevant to the catalog and to the users (patrons) of the library.

The card catalog was a familiar sight to library users for generations, but it has been effectively replaced by the online public access catalog (OPAC). Some still refer to the online catalog as a "card catalog". Some libraries with OPAC access still have card catalogs on site, but these are now strictly a secondary resource and are seldom updated. Many libraries that retain their physical card catalog will post a sign advising the last year that the card catalog was updated. Some libraries have eliminated their card catalog in favour of the OPAC for the purpose of saving space for other use, such as additional shelving.

The largest library catalog in the world is the WorldCat.org union catalog managed by the non-profit library cooperative OCLC , based in Dublin, Ohio . In January 2016, WorldCat.org had over 360,000,000 catalog records and over 2 billion library holdings. [1]

This Catalogue of the Craneflies of the World (CCW) covers all 17999 genus-group and species-group taxa of the families Pediciidae, Limoniidae, Cylindrotomidae, and Tipulidae (Insecta, Diptera, Tipuloidea). Its author is Pjotr Oosterbroek, staffmember of the former Zoological museum of the University of Amsterdam, associate staffmember of NCB-Naturalis, Leiden (see the Manual for contact information).

Apart from the standard taxonomic information (family, subfamily, genus, subgenus, species, subspecies, author, year, publication, synonyms, original genus, original spelling), the catalogue includes up to date information on the distribution of the species by countries and, for the larger countries (e.g., USA, China), provinces, states, or islands. For almost all information that differs from what is found in the regional printed catalogues the reference is given. The CCW furthermore includes reference to all relevant information and figures published by C.P. Alexander and others (see the Manual ).

For a quick search, please go to the Search page and enter a scientific name or country to search for. For more search options, select Advanced search . In the search results, empty fields are not displayed. Relevant cranefly literature can be searched for under Literature . The Manual in detail explains the background of the CCW and lists the abbreviations used in the search results. Database information such as the number of taxa included per family and the last update is listed under Statistics .

The British Museum uses cookies to ensure you have the best browsing experience and to help us improve the site.
By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. (Last updated: 12 January 2017) Find out more

Archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site of Naukratis that today are dispersed in museums worldwide.

Surviving papyri from a 13th Dynasty tomb at Luxor later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

Ben, our 16-year-old, regularly evokes what we call his “Catalogue of Grievances.” Picture the Sears Wishbook, but mental, and, you know, the opposite: a ledger of all the perceived wrongs he’s endured at our cruel or hapless hands. He loves to reminisce about them, flipping the book open at a seemingly random page to rehearse his injuries or shame, poking at it the way you might tongue a sore gum to reassure yourself that it still hurts. Or maybe more like the way you crack your knuckles—a kind of satisfyingly dramatic pop and stretch that doesn’t actually hurt. Or maybe more like gallows humor. The fact that I’m not sure which of these it is may turn out to be significant.

“Tell me some of your classic grievances,” I say now, because I’m writing about them, even though it’s a school morning and he’s trying to spread cream cheese on a bagel before it cools.

“Let me think,” he says patiently. “I mean, once they’re flowing, they’re really flowing. But sometimes it can be hard to get them started. I mean, besides, like, the obvious.”

A library catalog or library catalogue is a register of all bibliographic items found in a library or group of libraries, such as a network of libraries at several locations. A bibliographic item can be any information entity (e.g., books, computer files, graphics, realia , cartographic materials, etc.) that is considered library material (e.g., a single novel in an anthology ), or a group of library materials (e.g., a trilogy ), or linked from the catalog (e.g., a webpage) as far as it is relevant to the catalog and to the users (patrons) of the library.

The card catalog was a familiar sight to library users for generations, but it has been effectively replaced by the online public access catalog (OPAC). Some still refer to the online catalog as a "card catalog". Some libraries with OPAC access still have card catalogs on site, but these are now strictly a secondary resource and are seldom updated. Many libraries that retain their physical card catalog will post a sign advising the last year that the card catalog was updated. Some libraries have eliminated their card catalog in favour of the OPAC for the purpose of saving space for other use, such as additional shelving.

The largest library catalog in the world is the WorldCat.org union catalog managed by the non-profit library cooperative OCLC , based in Dublin, Ohio . In January 2016, WorldCat.org had over 360,000,000 catalog records and over 2 billion library holdings. [1]

The British Museum uses cookies to ensure you have the best browsing experience and to help us improve the site.
By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. (Last updated: 12 January 2017) Find out more

Archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site of Naukratis that today are dispersed in museums worldwide.

Surviving papyri from a 13th Dynasty tomb at Luxor later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

Ben, our 16-year-old, regularly evokes what we call his “Catalogue of Grievances.” Picture the Sears Wishbook, but mental, and, you know, the opposite: a ledger of all the perceived wrongs he’s endured at our cruel or hapless hands. He loves to reminisce about them, flipping the book open at a seemingly random page to rehearse his injuries or shame, poking at it the way you might tongue a sore gum to reassure yourself that it still hurts. Or maybe more like the way you crack your knuckles—a kind of satisfyingly dramatic pop and stretch that doesn’t actually hurt. Or maybe more like gallows humor. The fact that I’m not sure which of these it is may turn out to be significant.

“Tell me some of your classic grievances,” I say now, because I’m writing about them, even though it’s a school morning and he’s trying to spread cream cheese on a bagel before it cools.

“Let me think,” he says patiently. “I mean, once they’re flowing, they’re really flowing. But sometimes it can be hard to get them started. I mean, besides, like, the obvious.”

The British Museum uses cookies to ensure you have the best browsing experience and to help us improve the site.
By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. (Last updated: 12 January 2017) Find out more

Archaeological finds made in late 19th and early 20th century excavations at the site of Naukratis that today are dispersed in museums worldwide.

Surviving papyri from a 13th Dynasty tomb at Luxor later covered by the funerary temple of Ramses II, known as the Ramesseum.

Library of Congress Online Catalog


New General Catalogue - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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