Among the features of version 2.0 of the MyHeart Counts app are graphs showing how a user compares to others in terms of steps taken each day, happiness and amount of sleep.
MyHeart Counts developers

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have launched MyHeart Counts 2.0 , a major update to the popular research app that allows users to share heart health and activity data with researchers. The upgrades include the Stanford Coaching Module, which will test a series of four health interventions — prompts and suggestions aimed at improving heart health; more user feedback; graphics showing user data; and an improved user interface.

“I’m excited to be able to deliver more data back to the patient,” said Euan Ashley , DPhil, MRCP, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and of genetics at Stanford and the principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. Ashley’s team is also aggregating and analyzing heart health data from app users and using it to improve methods of preventing heart disease.

I complete workouts in an app called 7 Minute Workout, but I also log activities in Argus. My steps get counted with my FitBit, and my heart rate gets tracked in Instant Heart Rate. My data is everywhere -- well it was -- until Health came along.

Health, an app designed by Apple and stocked on iOS 8, finally gives us a way to put data from all kinds of apps in one place.

You'll often see Health in the context calorie-counting and fitness activity-tracking, but the platform is designed to handle much more than that. With the right coaxing, it can help you get a grip on other areas of wellness, such as vitamin intake (for managing deficiencies, for example), blood glucose tracking, sleep, and even vitals like heart rate and blood pressure.

The Heart Failure Health Storylines mobile app is created with input from people with heart failure and congestive heart failure (CHF) so that the right health tools are available to you. Now it’s easy to record your symptoms, vital signs, medications, and more. Choose what you want to track to build your own summary “My Storylines” to learn more about your health, and to share more – safely and securely – with your doctor about what happened between visits.

Heart Failure Health Storylines is developed in partnership with the Heart Failure Society of America, and is powered by the Health Storylines™ platform from Self Care Catalysts Inc . Heart Failure Storylines is free for all users and now available on the web , on Google Play™ and on the App Store℠.  The web version is accessible through any desktop computer or mobile device browser.

Note:  The mobile app is only available through the App store℠  and on Google Play™ in the United States and Canada. The web version is accessible from anywhere, but will initially be optimized for use in North America. Stay tuned for updates on new releases, which will continually be improved for an international audience!

Among the features of version 2.0 of the MyHeart Counts app are graphs showing how a user compares to others in terms of steps taken each day, happiness and amount of sleep.
MyHeart Counts developers

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have launched MyHeart Counts 2.0 , a major update to the popular research app that allows users to share heart health and activity data with researchers. The upgrades include the Stanford Coaching Module, which will test a series of four health interventions — prompts and suggestions aimed at improving heart health; more user feedback; graphics showing user data; and an improved user interface.

“I’m excited to be able to deliver more data back to the patient,” said Euan Ashley , DPhil, MRCP, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and of genetics at Stanford and the principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. Ashley’s team is also aggregating and analyzing heart health data from app users and using it to improve methods of preventing heart disease.

I complete workouts in an app called 7 Minute Workout, but I also log activities in Argus. My steps get counted with my FitBit, and my heart rate gets tracked in Instant Heart Rate. My data is everywhere -- well it was -- until Health came along.

Health, an app designed by Apple and stocked on iOS 8, finally gives us a way to put data from all kinds of apps in one place.

You'll often see Health in the context calorie-counting and fitness activity-tracking, but the platform is designed to handle much more than that. With the right coaxing, it can help you get a grip on other areas of wellness, such as vitamin intake (for managing deficiencies, for example), blood glucose tracking, sleep, and even vitals like heart rate and blood pressure.

The Heart Failure Health Storylines mobile app is created with input from people with heart failure and congestive heart failure (CHF) so that the right health tools are available to you. Now it’s easy to record your symptoms, vital signs, medications, and more. Choose what you want to track to build your own summary “My Storylines” to learn more about your health, and to share more – safely and securely – with your doctor about what happened between visits.

Heart Failure Health Storylines is developed in partnership with the Heart Failure Society of America, and is powered by the Health Storylines™ platform from Self Care Catalysts Inc . Heart Failure Storylines is free for all users and now available on the web , on Google Play™ and on the App Store℠.  The web version is accessible through any desktop computer or mobile device browser.

Note:  The mobile app is only available through the App store℠  and on Google Play™ in the United States and Canada. The web version is accessible from anywhere, but will initially be optimized for use in North America. Stay tuned for updates on new releases, which will continually be improved for an international audience!

Vida Health and AstraZeneca have teamed up to launch a new app for recovering heart attack patients that should help people recover faster from and better cope with the trauma associated with such life-threatening experiences.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Every year, about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack, and more than a quarter of those patients suffer from repeat attacks, according to the Centers for Disease Control . Heart disease is caused by several hereditary and lifestyle factors, and recovery from the first attack requires ongoing support to help prevent a second one. That’s where Vida Health and AstraZeneca’s Day-By-Day app comes into play.

The app, which is launching through a trial program at Duke University, is a HIPAA-compliant smartphone application that will walk patients step-by-step through the recovery process using live digital coaches and educational materials, like videos, articles, and food journals, to help patients implement lifestyle changes and adhere to their new drug regimen. It’s an extension of Vida Health’s current cloud-based smartphone app, which provides personal health coaching services on both Android and iOS devices for a range of chronic conditions.

ResearchKit is a powerful tool that helps medical researchers gather health data from many iPhone users. You can take part and allow your data to be used in meaningful studies. And CareKit helps you take an active role in managing your own health, giving you tools to track things like your symptoms and medications, then share that information with your care team.

Among the features of version 2.0 of the MyHeart Counts app are graphs showing how a user compares to others in terms of steps taken each day, happiness and amount of sleep.
MyHeart Counts developers

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have launched MyHeart Counts 2.0 , a major update to the popular research app that allows users to share heart health and activity data with researchers. The upgrades include the Stanford Coaching Module, which will test a series of four health interventions — prompts and suggestions aimed at improving heart health; more user feedback; graphics showing user data; and an improved user interface.

“I’m excited to be able to deliver more data back to the patient,” said Euan Ashley , DPhil, MRCP, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and of genetics at Stanford and the principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. Ashley’s team is also aggregating and analyzing heart health data from app users and using it to improve methods of preventing heart disease.

I complete workouts in an app called 7 Minute Workout, but I also log activities in Argus. My steps get counted with my FitBit, and my heart rate gets tracked in Instant Heart Rate. My data is everywhere -- well it was -- until Health came along.

Health, an app designed by Apple and stocked on iOS 8, finally gives us a way to put data from all kinds of apps in one place.

You'll often see Health in the context calorie-counting and fitness activity-tracking, but the platform is designed to handle much more than that. With the right coaxing, it can help you get a grip on other areas of wellness, such as vitamin intake (for managing deficiencies, for example), blood glucose tracking, sleep, and even vitals like heart rate and blood pressure.

The Heart Failure Health Storylines mobile app is created with input from people with heart failure and congestive heart failure (CHF) so that the right health tools are available to you. Now it’s easy to record your symptoms, vital signs, medications, and more. Choose what you want to track to build your own summary “My Storylines” to learn more about your health, and to share more – safely and securely – with your doctor about what happened between visits.

Heart Failure Health Storylines is developed in partnership with the Heart Failure Society of America, and is powered by the Health Storylines™ platform from Self Care Catalysts Inc . Heart Failure Storylines is free for all users and now available on the web , on Google Play™ and on the App Store℠.  The web version is accessible through any desktop computer or mobile device browser.

Note:  The mobile app is only available through the App store℠  and on Google Play™ in the United States and Canada. The web version is accessible from anywhere, but will initially be optimized for use in North America. Stay tuned for updates on new releases, which will continually be improved for an international audience!

Vida Health and AstraZeneca have teamed up to launch a new app for recovering heart attack patients that should help people recover faster from and better cope with the trauma associated with such life-threatening experiences.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Every year, about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack, and more than a quarter of those patients suffer from repeat attacks, according to the Centers for Disease Control . Heart disease is caused by several hereditary and lifestyle factors, and recovery from the first attack requires ongoing support to help prevent a second one. That’s where Vida Health and AstraZeneca’s Day-By-Day app comes into play.

The app, which is launching through a trial program at Duke University, is a HIPAA-compliant smartphone application that will walk patients step-by-step through the recovery process using live digital coaches and educational materials, like videos, articles, and food journals, to help patients implement lifestyle changes and adhere to their new drug regimen. It’s an extension of Vida Health’s current cloud-based smartphone app, which provides personal health coaching services on both Android and iOS devices for a range of chronic conditions.

Among the features of version 2.0 of the MyHeart Counts app are graphs showing how a user compares to others in terms of steps taken each day, happiness and amount of sleep.
MyHeart Counts developers

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have launched MyHeart Counts 2.0 , a major update to the popular research app that allows users to share heart health and activity data with researchers. The upgrades include the Stanford Coaching Module, which will test a series of four health interventions — prompts and suggestions aimed at improving heart health; more user feedback; graphics showing user data; and an improved user interface.

“I’m excited to be able to deliver more data back to the patient,” said Euan Ashley , DPhil, MRCP, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and of genetics at Stanford and the principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. Ashley’s team is also aggregating and analyzing heart health data from app users and using it to improve methods of preventing heart disease.

Among the features of version 2.0 of the MyHeart Counts app are graphs showing how a user compares to others in terms of steps taken each day, happiness and amount of sleep.
MyHeart Counts developers

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have launched MyHeart Counts 2.0 , a major update to the popular research app that allows users to share heart health and activity data with researchers. The upgrades include the Stanford Coaching Module, which will test a series of four health interventions — prompts and suggestions aimed at improving heart health; more user feedback; graphics showing user data; and an improved user interface.

“I’m excited to be able to deliver more data back to the patient,” said Euan Ashley , DPhil, MRCP, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and of genetics at Stanford and the principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. Ashley’s team is also aggregating and analyzing heart health data from app users and using it to improve methods of preventing heart disease.

I complete workouts in an app called 7 Minute Workout, but I also log activities in Argus. My steps get counted with my FitBit, and my heart rate gets tracked in Instant Heart Rate. My data is everywhere -- well it was -- until Health came along.

Health, an app designed by Apple and stocked on iOS 8, finally gives us a way to put data from all kinds of apps in one place.

You'll often see Health in the context calorie-counting and fitness activity-tracking, but the platform is designed to handle much more than that. With the right coaxing, it can help you get a grip on other areas of wellness, such as vitamin intake (for managing deficiencies, for example), blood glucose tracking, sleep, and even vitals like heart rate and blood pressure.

Use the Health app on your iPhone or iPod touch - Apple.


iOS - Health - Apple

Posted by 2018 article

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