Next week PHE will host  our fifth annual conference at the University of Warwick . As we prepare to bring together the public health community I’m taking a look with PHE colleagues at three key topics which are at the forefront of public health and which cut through many of our conference sessions: health inequalities, the economic case for prevention and the impact of world leading science on the public’s health, which I explore in this blog with Christine McCartney.

At PHE we generate a good deal of our own scientific knowledge but of course we are not self-sufficient in this respect and are constantly using or reporting the work of others.

Nearly all good science is done in collaboration these days and we also support the work of many other science-based organisations.

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

Next week PHE will host  our fifth annual conference at the University of Warwick . As we prepare to bring together the public health community I’m taking a look with PHE colleagues at three key topics which are at the forefront of public health and which cut through many of our conference sessions: health inequalities, the economic case for prevention and the impact of world leading science on the public’s health, which I explore in this blog with Christine McCartney.

At PHE we generate a good deal of our own scientific knowledge but of course we are not self-sufficient in this respect and are constantly using or reporting the work of others.

Nearly all good science is done in collaboration these days and we also support the work of many other science-based organisations.

The Impact of Society on Science | Science


The Impact of Science on Society - Wikiquote

Posted by 2018 article

41FZo8SCqdL