The Ford Mustang Boss 302 was largely the brainchild of two former GM employees – Larry Shinoda and Semon “Bunkie” Knudson. Knudson had been named President of Ford in 1968, he brought Shinoda over from GM to breathe life into the company’s model range – starting with the original pony car.

One of Knudson’s first projects was a new high-performance Mustang, he told his designers “I want to design a car that’s the coolest Mustang out there. I don’t want somebody else’s name on it, like a Shelby.”

Shinoda set to work updating the look of the Mustang, which had been introduced in 1964, triggering an arms race amongst American car manufacturers to build the fastest and most powerful pony car. Larry’s influence at GM had been significant, he developed the Mako Shark show car that he would later develop into the C3 Corvette, and he’d worked closely with Bill Mitchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov on earlier Corvette designs from 1956 till he left to move to Ford in ’68.

Built by Ford in Dearborn, Michigan on October 27th, 1969. Sold on November 6th, 1969. Delivered to Los Angeles Ford dealer, Crenshaw Motors. A California car with dry, rust-free bones and good body shell. Spending many years in the dry, central California valley.

Power steering, rear deck spoiler, louvered rear window slats, shaker hood scoop, front spoiler, Magnum wheels, traction lock differential, sport deck rear seat, radio, tinted glass and tachometer.

An excellent example with photos and receipts for recent restoration work to include engine rebuild, clutch, carburetor, brakes, exhaust and much more. Ready for the local car show or a nice sporting drive.

The Ford Mustang Boss 302 was largely the brainchild of two former GM employees – Larry Shinoda and Semon “Bunkie” Knudson. Knudson had been named President of Ford in 1968, he brought Shinoda over from GM to breathe life into the company’s model range – starting with the original pony car.

One of Knudson’s first projects was a new high-performance Mustang, he told his designers “I want to design a car that’s the coolest Mustang out there. I don’t want somebody else’s name on it, like a Shelby.”

Shinoda set to work updating the look of the Mustang, which had been introduced in 1964, triggering an arms race amongst American car manufacturers to build the fastest and most powerful pony car. Larry’s influence at GM had been significant, he developed the Mako Shark show car that he would later develop into the C3 Corvette, and he’d worked closely with Bill Mitchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov on earlier Corvette designs from 1956 till he left to move to Ford in ’68.

Built by Ford in Dearborn, Michigan on October 27th, 1969. Sold on November 6th, 1969. Delivered to Los Angeles Ford dealer, Crenshaw Motors. A California car with dry, rust-free bones and good body shell. Spending many years in the dry, central California valley.

Power steering, rear deck spoiler, louvered rear window slats, shaker hood scoop, front spoiler, Magnum wheels, traction lock differential, sport deck rear seat, radio, tinted glass and tachometer.

An excellent example with photos and receipts for recent restoration work to include engine rebuild, clutch, carburetor, brakes, exhaust and much more. Ready for the local car show or a nice sporting drive.

California Special. GT. Mach. These are not just names of Mustangs. These are the names of Mustangs that got two chances at life. There was only one Mustang that Ford had yet to recreate — the baddest of all, the Boss. That is, until now. Meet the 2012 Ford Mustang Boss 302, the best, most well-rounded Mustang ever.

What exactly did Ford do to get such great performance? Lots. Engineers started with a standard 5.0-liter engine, but instead of just throwing a supercharger on it, Ford kept this engine au natural and made it a free-flowing, high-revving screamer with a new “runners-in-the-box” plenum/velocity stack combination. Ford used revised camshafts with a more aggressive grind, and CNC machined the intake, exhaust ports, and combustion chambers of the aluminum heads.

All internal components are lightweight. A high-rpm valvetrain was designed, while a race-spec crankshaft and stronger main and rod bearings accommodate the increased load and high engine speeds. An oil cooler helps prevent the engine’s blood from boiling, and revised oil-pan baffling keeps things pumping properly during hard cornering. The Laguna Seca edition gets a transmission scoop under the car to cool those fast-spinning gears.

The new optional 10-speed SelectShift ® automatic transmission changes the game. An all-new electronic control system in the transmission features real-time adaptive shift-scheduling algorithms engineered to help ensure the right gear at the right time, including skip-shift and direct downshift capability. That translates into optimum ratio progression and efficiency, smoother shifting and better performance across the board.

These are just some of the great things you can do with FordPass. And if you haven’t already,  download the FordPass app on the App Store ® 167  or get it on Google Play. 43

EPA Est. MPG 21 city 31 hwy 2  

The Ford Mustang Boss 302 was largely the brainchild of two former GM employees – Larry Shinoda and Semon “Bunkie” Knudson. Knudson had been named President of Ford in 1968, he brought Shinoda over from GM to breathe life into the company’s model range – starting with the original pony car.

One of Knudson’s first projects was a new high-performance Mustang, he told his designers “I want to design a car that’s the coolest Mustang out there. I don’t want somebody else’s name on it, like a Shelby.”

Shinoda set to work updating the look of the Mustang, which had been introduced in 1964, triggering an arms race amongst American car manufacturers to build the fastest and most powerful pony car. Larry’s influence at GM had been significant, he developed the Mako Shark show car that he would later develop into the C3 Corvette, and he’d worked closely with Bill Mitchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov on earlier Corvette designs from 1956 till he left to move to Ford in ’68.

Built by Ford in Dearborn, Michigan on October 27th, 1969. Sold on November 6th, 1969. Delivered to Los Angeles Ford dealer, Crenshaw Motors. A California car with dry, rust-free bones and good body shell. Spending many years in the dry, central California valley.

Power steering, rear deck spoiler, louvered rear window slats, shaker hood scoop, front spoiler, Magnum wheels, traction lock differential, sport deck rear seat, radio, tinted glass and tachometer.

An excellent example with photos and receipts for recent restoration work to include engine rebuild, clutch, carburetor, brakes, exhaust and much more. Ready for the local car show or a nice sporting drive.

California Special. GT. Mach. These are not just names of Mustangs. These are the names of Mustangs that got two chances at life. There was only one Mustang that Ford had yet to recreate — the baddest of all, the Boss. That is, until now. Meet the 2012 Ford Mustang Boss 302, the best, most well-rounded Mustang ever.

What exactly did Ford do to get such great performance? Lots. Engineers started with a standard 5.0-liter engine, but instead of just throwing a supercharger on it, Ford kept this engine au natural and made it a free-flowing, high-revving screamer with a new “runners-in-the-box” plenum/velocity stack combination. Ford used revised camshafts with a more aggressive grind, and CNC machined the intake, exhaust ports, and combustion chambers of the aluminum heads.

All internal components are lightweight. A high-rpm valvetrain was designed, while a race-spec crankshaft and stronger main and rod bearings accommodate the increased load and high engine speeds. An oil cooler helps prevent the engine’s blood from boiling, and revised oil-pan baffling keeps things pumping properly during hard cornering. The Laguna Seca edition gets a transmission scoop under the car to cool those fast-spinning gears.

The Ford Mustang Boss 302 was largely the brainchild of two former GM employees – Larry Shinoda and Semon “Bunkie” Knudson. Knudson had been named President of Ford in 1968, he brought Shinoda over from GM to breathe life into the company’s model range – starting with the original pony car.

One of Knudson’s first projects was a new high-performance Mustang, he told his designers “I want to design a car that’s the coolest Mustang out there. I don’t want somebody else’s name on it, like a Shelby.”

Shinoda set to work updating the look of the Mustang, which had been introduced in 1964, triggering an arms race amongst American car manufacturers to build the fastest and most powerful pony car. Larry’s influence at GM had been significant, he developed the Mako Shark show car that he would later develop into the C3 Corvette, and he’d worked closely with Bill Mitchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov on earlier Corvette designs from 1956 till he left to move to Ford in ’68.

Ford Mustang Boss 302 Prices, Reviews and New Model.


2018 Ford® Mustang Sports Car | 1 Sports Car for Over 50.

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