Life won't always gift your child with exactly his heart's desire. But there are ways you can make sure that, underneath it all, he learns to appreciate what he has.

I was 7 years old when I received a tiny Christmas present—about the size of an eraser—awkwardly wrapped and covered in tape. My sister's boyfriend, Jeff, was visiting and had considerately brought gifts for his girlfriend's three younger siblings. Mine, though, was by far the smallest. I remember opening it up to reveal a miniature ceramic dog—a cold, hard nothing that fit in the palm of my hand—and thinking how unlucky I was. I gave Jeff my best cold shoulder the rest of the day.

And I've felt guilty about it ever since. Partly because, in hindsight, Jeff's gift was very thoughtful: I'd been obsessed with my dollhouse, and he had managed to find one accessory my dream home did not yet have—a pet. Still, I couldn't look past the size of the gift to be grateful for the amount of care that had gone into choosing it.

Discussing death with your kids can be a real concern and many tend to avoid it. Death is however an inevitable part of life and it is our responsibility to ensure our kids are aware of it and know it’s okay to discuss it.

If we allow children to talk to us about death, we can give them needed information, prepare them for a crisis, and help them when they are upset. We can encourage their communication by showing attention and respect for what they have to say. We can also make it easier for them to talk to us if we are open, honest, and at ease with our own feelings.

Death is very much a part of our lives on many different levels. We may be surprised at how aware children already are about death. They see dead insects, dead birds and animals on the road or a family pet may have died. Children read about death in their fairy tales, watch it in cartoons and even role-play death in school plays. Without realising it they already have some exposure to the concept.

Life won't always gift your child with exactly his heart's desire. But there are ways you can make sure that, underneath it all, he learns to appreciate what he has.

I was 7 years old when I received a tiny Christmas present—about the size of an eraser—awkwardly wrapped and covered in tape. My sister's boyfriend, Jeff, was visiting and had considerately brought gifts for his girlfriend's three younger siblings. Mine, though, was by far the smallest. I remember opening it up to reveal a miniature ceramic dog—a cold, hard nothing that fit in the palm of my hand—and thinking how unlucky I was. I gave Jeff my best cold shoulder the rest of the day.

And I've felt guilty about it ever since. Partly because, in hindsight, Jeff's gift was very thoughtful: I'd been obsessed with my dollhouse, and he had managed to find one accessory my dream home did not yet have—a pet. Still, I couldn't look past the size of the gift to be grateful for the amount of care that had gone into choosing it.

Raising heaven-bound kids in a hell-bent world (Book, 2000.


Raising Heaven Bound Kids In A Hell Bent World: Sound.

Posted by 2018 article

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