All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Here are several charts showing Vesta’s path. It is actually bright enough this month to see with the naked eye. But for that you would need both good eyesight and skies pretty much free of light pollution. For most of us, though, it will be an easy target using binoculars, and the best time to look will be around midnight when it’s about as high as it gets just east of south.  Digging one little star-like dot out of a dim section of sky is always a fun challenge.  Think of being the first to discover that this dim star moved! Oh the excitement that must have caused back in 1807!

Zooming in on the “Arrowhead”  and Vesta, here’s what we can expect.  Click on the  image for a much larger version. Note – numbers in parentheses are magnitudes with the period omitted to avoid confusion with stars. Thus Vesta’s magnitude on August 1 is 5.7. The green circle represents a seven degree field of view, typical for low power binoculars. (Similar charts will be published next month for September and October.)

This same chart can be used to trace the path of Vesta during September and October as well. That’s because Vesta continues moving west for only about one degree past Psi (Ψ) Capricorni. By the middle of September it will appear to slow down, stay in one place for a few days, then start back-tracking quite close to the path it has been following.  So click here to download a printer-friendly (black on white) version of this chart that you can use to record your own observations of Vesta.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Here are several charts showing Vesta’s path. It is actually bright enough this month to see with the naked eye. But for that you would need both good eyesight and skies pretty much free of light pollution. For most of us, though, it will be an easy target using binoculars, and the best time to look will be around midnight when it’s about as high as it gets just east of south.  Digging one little star-like dot out of a dim section of sky is always a fun challenge.  Think of being the first to discover that this dim star moved! Oh the excitement that must have caused back in 1807!

Zooming in on the “Arrowhead”  and Vesta, here’s what we can expect.  Click on the  image for a much larger version. Note – numbers in parentheses are magnitudes with the period omitted to avoid confusion with stars. Thus Vesta’s magnitude on August 1 is 5.7. The green circle represents a seven degree field of view, typical for low power binoculars. (Similar charts will be published next month for September and October.)

This same chart can be used to trace the path of Vesta during September and October as well. That’s because Vesta continues moving west for only about one degree past Psi (Ψ) Capricorni. By the middle of September it will appear to slow down, stay in one place for a few days, then start back-tracking quite close to the path it has been following.  So click here to download a printer-friendly (black on white) version of this chart that you can use to record your own observations of Vesta.

Vesta , minor-planet designation 4 Vesta , is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt , with a mean diameter of 525 kilometres (326 mi). [7] It was discovered by the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers on 29 March 1807 [5] and is named after Vesta , the virgin goddess of home and hearth from Roman mythology .

Vesta is the brightest asteroid visible from Earth. Its maximum distance from the Sun is slightly greater than the minimum distance of Ceres from the Sun, [c] though its orbit lies entirely within that of Ceres. [33]

NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Vesta on 16 July 2011 for a one-year exploration and left orbit on 5 September 2012 [34] en route to its final destination, Ceres. Researchers continue to examine data collected by Dawn for additional insights into the formation and history of Vesta. [35] [36]

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Here are several charts showing Vesta’s path. It is actually bright enough this month to see with the naked eye. But for that you would need both good eyesight and skies pretty much free of light pollution. For most of us, though, it will be an easy target using binoculars, and the best time to look will be around midnight when it’s about as high as it gets just east of south.  Digging one little star-like dot out of a dim section of sky is always a fun challenge.  Think of being the first to discover that this dim star moved! Oh the excitement that must have caused back in 1807!

Zooming in on the “Arrowhead”  and Vesta, here’s what we can expect.  Click on the  image for a much larger version. Note – numbers in parentheses are magnitudes with the period omitted to avoid confusion with stars. Thus Vesta’s magnitude on August 1 is 5.7. The green circle represents a seven degree field of view, typical for low power binoculars. (Similar charts will be published next month for September and October.)

This same chart can be used to trace the path of Vesta during September and October as well. That’s because Vesta continues moving west for only about one degree past Psi (Ψ) Capricorni. By the middle of September it will appear to slow down, stay in one place for a few days, then start back-tracking quite close to the path it has been following.  So click here to download a printer-friendly (black on white) version of this chart that you can use to record your own observations of Vesta.

Vesta , minor-planet designation 4 Vesta , is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt , with a mean diameter of 525 kilometres (326 mi). [7] It was discovered by the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers on 29 March 1807 [5] and is named after Vesta , the virgin goddess of home and hearth from Roman mythology .

Vesta is the brightest asteroid visible from Earth. Its maximum distance from the Sun is slightly greater than the minimum distance of Ceres from the Sun, [c] though its orbit lies entirely within that of Ceres. [33]

NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Vesta on 16 July 2011 for a one-year exploration and left orbit on 5 September 2012 [34] en route to its final destination, Ceres. Researchers continue to examine data collected by Dawn for additional insights into the formation and history of Vesta. [35] [36]

Compute Asteroid 4 Vesta ephemerides for any date and time between 01 Jan 2013 and 31 Dec 2075 and display the predicted position in an interactive sky map.

This is a simplified sky chart, showing where Asteroid 4 Vesta is now with respect to the brightest stars and constellations.

More advanced sky charts are available on TheSkyLive for this object: 1) the Online Planetarium which is interactive and allows to select dates and additional objects to visualize; and 2) the Live Position and Data Tracker which provides the highest precision position data and features deep sky imagery from the Digitized Sky Survey.

Vesta: Facts About the Brightest Asteroid - Space.com


List of exceptional asteroids - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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