J.P. Morgan was a wealthy American capitalist and businessman who has often been referred to as a "robber baron." The term was traditionally used in 19th-century America to describe aggressive, successful and powerful men or women who attained their wealth by unethical or questionable means. Other so-called robber barons of his time period include Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Charles M. Schwab and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Though the term is less common in subsequent centuries, the same characteristics are still recognized in prominent businessmen across the globe. Defining traits of a robber baron are the tendency to exploit workers, exercise undue influence over government policies and regulations, create monopolies by taking over the competition, overtake or control national resources and manipulate the stock market. J.P. Morgan had business dealings in railroads, steel, electricity, manufacturing, banking and more.

During the Great Depression, author and political commentator Matthew Josephson gave credence to the term robber baron in a book bearing the same title. The book, and its premise that unscrupulous businessmen caused the economic turmoil and devastation of the Great Depression, fueled contempt and scorn for large corporations that succeeded at the expense of ordinary citizens. A pop icon for a robber baron is immortalized in the mascot for the Monopoly board game, depicting a man in a suit with a black top hat.

The Titanic, registered as a British mail ship was really owned by the American railroad tycoon, John Pierpont (J.P.) Morgan. He had most of the controlling interest in the American railroads and was looking to expand his ownership to seize control of the Atlantic shipping trade. He succeeded in acquiring the White Star Line in 1902.

White Star had asked the City of New York to enlarge and extend the piers to accommodate their new super liners and were flatly refused. The City stated that the long piers would extend too far into the Hudson River causing a hazard to navigation. They were subtly persuaded by Morgan who all but owned the docks of New York and had the means to choke the City's import and export trade.

John Pierpont Morgan He was born on Monday 17th April 1837 in Hartford (CT, USA), he was almost 75 when the Titanic sank. He had his very own private suite and promenade deck on the Titanic. He was supposed to join her for her maiden voyage but cancelled his passage, sparing him the fate of many of the other millionaires. He died on Monday 31st March 1913.

J.P. Morgan was a wealthy American capitalist and businessman who has often been referred to as a "robber baron." The term was traditionally used in 19th-century America to describe aggressive, successful and powerful men or women who attained their wealth by unethical or questionable means. Other so-called robber barons of his time period include Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Charles M. Schwab and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Though the term is less common in subsequent centuries, the same characteristics are still recognized in prominent businessmen across the globe. Defining traits of a robber baron are the tendency to exploit workers, exercise undue influence over government policies and regulations, create monopolies by taking over the competition, overtake or control national resources and manipulate the stock market. J.P. Morgan had business dealings in railroads, steel, electricity, manufacturing, banking and more.

During the Great Depression, author and political commentator Matthew Josephson gave credence to the term robber baron in a book bearing the same title. The book, and its premise that unscrupulous businessmen caused the economic turmoil and devastation of the Great Depression, fueled contempt and scorn for large corporations that succeeded at the expense of ordinary citizens. A pop icon for a robber baron is immortalized in the mascot for the Monopoly board game, depicting a man in a suit with a black top hat.

The Titanic, registered as a British mail ship was really owned by the American railroad tycoon, John Pierpont (J.P.) Morgan. He had most of the controlling interest in the American railroads and was looking to expand his ownership to seize control of the Atlantic shipping trade. He succeeded in acquiring the White Star Line in 1902.

White Star had asked the City of New York to enlarge and extend the piers to accommodate their new super liners and were flatly refused. The City stated that the long piers would extend too far into the Hudson River causing a hazard to navigation. They were subtly persuaded by Morgan who all but owned the docks of New York and had the means to choke the City's import and export trade.

John Pierpont Morgan He was born on Monday 17th April 1837 in Hartford (CT, USA), he was almost 75 when the Titanic sank. He had his very own private suite and promenade deck on the Titanic. He was supposed to join her for her maiden voyage but cancelled his passage, sparing him the fate of many of the other millionaires. He died on Monday 31st March 1913.

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Copyright © 1998-2016 by Benjamin Robert Tubb .
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The Morgan Library & Museum – formerly the Pierpont Morgan Library – is a museum and research library located at 225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan , New York City . It was founded to house the private library of J. P. Morgan in 1906, which included manuscripts and printed books, some of them in rare bindings, as well as his collection of prints and drawings. The library was designed by Charles McKim of the firm of McKim, Mead and White and cost $1.2 million. It was made a public institution in 1924 by J. P. Morgan's son John Pierpont Morgan, Jr. , in accordance with his father's will.

The building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966 [4] and was declared a National Historic Landmark later that same year. [3] [5] [6]

Other notable artists of the Morgan Library and Museum are Jean de Brunhoff , Paul Cézanne , Vincent van Gogh , John Leech , Gaston Phoebus , Rembrandt van Rijn , and John Ruskin . [9]

J.P. Morgan was a wealthy American capitalist and businessman who has often been referred to as a "robber baron." The term was traditionally used in 19th-century America to describe aggressive, successful and powerful men or women who attained their wealth by unethical or questionable means. Other so-called robber barons of his time period include Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Charles M. Schwab and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Though the term is less common in subsequent centuries, the same characteristics are still recognized in prominent businessmen across the globe. Defining traits of a robber baron are the tendency to exploit workers, exercise undue influence over government policies and regulations, create monopolies by taking over the competition, overtake or control national resources and manipulate the stock market. J.P. Morgan had business dealings in railroads, steel, electricity, manufacturing, banking and more.

During the Great Depression, author and political commentator Matthew Josephson gave credence to the term robber baron in a book bearing the same title. The book, and its premise that unscrupulous businessmen caused the economic turmoil and devastation of the Great Depression, fueled contempt and scorn for large corporations that succeeded at the expense of ordinary citizens. A pop icon for a robber baron is immortalized in the mascot for the Monopoly board game, depicting a man in a suit with a black top hat.

J.P. Morgan was a wealthy American capitalist and businessman who has often been referred to as a "robber baron." The term was traditionally used in 19th-century America to describe aggressive, successful and powerful men or women who attained their wealth by unethical or questionable means. Other so-called robber barons of his time period include Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Charles M. Schwab and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Though the term is less common in subsequent centuries, the same characteristics are still recognized in prominent businessmen across the globe. Defining traits of a robber baron are the tendency to exploit workers, exercise undue influence over government policies and regulations, create monopolies by taking over the competition, overtake or control national resources and manipulate the stock market. J.P. Morgan had business dealings in railroads, steel, electricity, manufacturing, banking and more.

During the Great Depression, author and political commentator Matthew Josephson gave credence to the term robber baron in a book bearing the same title. The book, and its premise that unscrupulous businessmen caused the economic turmoil and devastation of the Great Depression, fueled contempt and scorn for large corporations that succeeded at the expense of ordinary citizens. A pop icon for a robber baron is immortalized in the mascot for the Monopoly board game, depicting a man in a suit with a black top hat.

The Titanic, registered as a British mail ship was really owned by the American railroad tycoon, John Pierpont (J.P.) Morgan. He had most of the controlling interest in the American railroads and was looking to expand his ownership to seize control of the Atlantic shipping trade. He succeeded in acquiring the White Star Line in 1902.

White Star had asked the City of New York to enlarge and extend the piers to accommodate their new super liners and were flatly refused. The City stated that the long piers would extend too far into the Hudson River causing a hazard to navigation. They were subtly persuaded by Morgan who all but owned the docks of New York and had the means to choke the City's import and export trade.

John Pierpont Morgan He was born on Monday 17th April 1837 in Hartford (CT, USA), he was almost 75 when the Titanic sank. He had his very own private suite and promenade deck on the Titanic. He was supposed to join her for her maiden voyage but cancelled his passage, sparing him the fate of many of the other millionaires. He died on Monday 31st March 1913.

Webpage contents and all MIDI files are
Copyright © 1998-2016 by Benjamin Robert Tubb .
All Rights Reserved.
Last updated on 24 October 2016.

J.P. Morgan - Facts & Summary - HISTORY.com


J.P. Morgan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

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