Turner is regarded as a precursor of Impressionism. He is known to have introduced colour into shadows. Previously, painting was tonal with colour added to enable the eye to move more freely, shadow areas remained relatively colourless. Painting was about things and the space things inhabited. Colour belonged to the identity of things. However, this only applies to painting that deals with local colour, i.e. Renaissance and post-Renaissance painting. Earlier painting had used colour more simply and freely, but without achieving sculptural, three dimensional form and space.

Until the Renaissance, local colour, form and space and aerial perspective weren’t fully developed. Leonardo da Vinci first proved and demonstrated the existence of aerial perspective. He conducted experiments painting outdoors: painting a tree seen from say, fifty feet, then a hundred and so on. By doing this he captured the diffusion which occurs when things are seen from far away. But inadvertently, he also captured a moment of death. As the tree retreats into the distance it breaks up, dissolves and finally disappears. Swallowed by the atmospheric envelope which previously had cradled it in sunshine and warmth. Leonardo was one of the greatest painters of death in life.

Some of Turner’s best known maritime paintings  have a sort of respectful awareness of the viewer: ships standing to attention in the distance, waiting for the salute, before gently gliding away to the strains of Rule Britannia. This is the side which endears Turner to some and to ignore it would be missing the point. Does great art try to endear itself?

Turner is regarded as a precursor of Impressionism. He is known to have introduced colour into shadows. Previously, painting was tonal with colour added to enable the eye to move more freely, shadow areas remained relatively colourless. Painting was about things and the space things inhabited. Colour belonged to the identity of things. However, this only applies to painting that deals with local colour, i.e. Renaissance and post-Renaissance painting. Earlier painting had used colour more simply and freely, but without achieving sculptural, three dimensional form and space.

Until the Renaissance, local colour, form and space and aerial perspective weren’t fully developed. Leonardo da Vinci first proved and demonstrated the existence of aerial perspective. He conducted experiments painting outdoors: painting a tree seen from say, fifty feet, then a hundred and so on. By doing this he captured the diffusion which occurs when things are seen from far away. But inadvertently, he also captured a moment of death. As the tree retreats into the distance it breaks up, dissolves and finally disappears. Swallowed by the atmospheric envelope which previously had cradled it in sunshine and warmth. Leonardo was one of the greatest painters of death in life.

Some of Turner’s best known maritime paintings  have a sort of respectful awareness of the viewer: ships standing to attention in the distance, waiting for the salute, before gently gliding away to the strains of Rule Britannia. This is the side which endears Turner to some and to ignore it would be missing the point. Does great art try to endear itself?

Impressionist Painters
Artists of Impressionism in Europe, America, Australia.
MAIN A-Z INDEX - A-Z of ART MOVEMENTS

• Introduction
• The Story of the First Impressionist Painters
- The Liberation of Light
- Influences that Shaped the Impressionists
- Impressionist Group Dissolves
• French Impressionists
• German Impressionists
• Dutch Impressionists
• British Impressionists
• Danish/Swedish
• American
• Russian
• Italian/Spanish
• Australian
• Best Impressionist Paintings


Going Home (1889)
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.
By the British-Australian Impressionist
Charles Conder.

Impressionism
Aims, Greatest Impressionists, Impact on Western Art.
MAIN A-Z INDEX - A-Z of ART MOVEMENTS


Lady in Blue (1900-04)
Hermitage, St Petersburg.
Moscow. By Paul Cezanne.

THE IMPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT
• Origins and Influences
• Early History
• Impressionist Edouard Manet
• Impressionist Claude Monet
• Renoir, Sisley, Pissarro, Degas, Cezanne
• Claude Monet & Camille Pissarro Travel to London
• Impressionist Painting Developments
• Impressionist Exhibitions in Paris
• Group Splits
• Legacy of Impressionism

Turner is regarded as a precursor of Impressionism. He is known to have introduced colour into shadows. Previously, painting was tonal with colour added to enable the eye to move more freely, shadow areas remained relatively colourless. Painting was about things and the space things inhabited. Colour belonged to the identity of things. However, this only applies to painting that deals with local colour, i.e. Renaissance and post-Renaissance painting. Earlier painting had used colour more simply and freely, but without achieving sculptural, three dimensional form and space.

Until the Renaissance, local colour, form and space and aerial perspective weren’t fully developed. Leonardo da Vinci first proved and demonstrated the existence of aerial perspective. He conducted experiments painting outdoors: painting a tree seen from say, fifty feet, then a hundred and so on. By doing this he captured the diffusion which occurs when things are seen from far away. But inadvertently, he also captured a moment of death. As the tree retreats into the distance it breaks up, dissolves and finally disappears. Swallowed by the atmospheric envelope which previously had cradled it in sunshine and warmth. Leonardo was one of the greatest painters of death in life.

Some of Turner’s best known maritime paintings  have a sort of respectful awareness of the viewer: ships standing to attention in the distance, waiting for the salute, before gently gliding away to the strains of Rule Britannia. This is the side which endears Turner to some and to ignore it would be missing the point. Does great art try to endear itself?

Impressionist Painters
Artists of Impressionism in Europe, America, Australia.
MAIN A-Z INDEX - A-Z of ART MOVEMENTS

• Introduction
• The Story of the First Impressionist Painters
- The Liberation of Light
- Influences that Shaped the Impressionists
- Impressionist Group Dissolves
• French Impressionists
• German Impressionists
• Dutch Impressionists
• British Impressionists
• Danish/Swedish
• American
• Russian
• Italian/Spanish
• Australian
• Best Impressionist Paintings


Going Home (1889)
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.
By the British-Australian Impressionist
Charles Conder.

An Impressionist Legacy: Monet to Moore The Millennium.


An Impressionist Legacy | Grafico Topico

Posted by 2018 article

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