John Byrne's Next Men (also known as Next Men or JBNM ) is an American comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne . The first volume of the series was published by Dark Horse Comics between 1991 and 1995. A nine–issue miniseries was published by IDW Publishing in 2010 and 2011, followed by another series titled Next Men: Aftermath in 2012.

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as "Freaks" in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics , but the series never surfaced there . [1] With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112 , to become the John Byrne's Next Men series. Two characters from the "Freaks" artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine (aka "Jazz") and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four–part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54–57 (Sept.–Dec. 1991), later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne's Next Men #0 (Feb. 1992). The series ran until issue #30 (Dec. 1994) [2] and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a "sort of smell" of being a super-hero book. [3] In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as " thought-bubbles " and sound-effects.


John Bennett, portrayed by Matt McGorry , is a former Correctional Officer at Litchfield Penitentiary . He is from the Poughkeepsie, New York area. He is the father of Daya's daughter, Armaria , and his current whereabouts are unknown.

John Bennett has short dark-brown hair and is mostly seen in his CO uniform in the episodes. However, at home, he is seen wearing more casual attire, such as when he came to Cesar's house to inform him of his and Daya's engagement. He has a prosthetic left leg.

Bennett is revealed to have been a corporal in the United States Army prior to working at Litchfield. He was on a tour of duty in Afghanistan. He tosses a bottle of water to an Afghan attaché named Farzad. He asks the attache why his three partners look nauseated and upset, and is informed that the other three Afghan attachés believe all the soldiers at the camp are "boy kiss boy" (homosexual) after seeing the soldiers engaging in choreographed song and dance while filming a homoerotic parody video. Bennett unwittingly confirms that he can see how they think the soldiers are gay.

On Sunday, the GLOW actress hit the SAG Awards red carpet as she was nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series. However, as brother-in-law James Franco has recently been accused of sexual misconduct by several women , Brie was inundated with questions about the controversy.

While Alison's Netflix hit is all about female empowerment, she's also incredibly close to husband Dave Franco 's family. Thus, we can only imagine how torn the Mad Men alum feels during this time.

Thankfully, Alison didn't dodge the question as she addressed the alleged misconduct with Giuliana Rancic . The 35-year-old shared:

کليه حقوق اين سايت متعلق به شرکت آوازه نو پوشان پارسی (فروشگاه اینترنتی دیجی استایل) می‌باشد. digistyle.com - 2018 © Copyright

John Byrne's Next Men (also known as Next Men or JBNM ) is an American comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne . The first volume of the series was published by Dark Horse Comics between 1991 and 1995. A nine–issue miniseries was published by IDW Publishing in 2010 and 2011, followed by another series titled Next Men: Aftermath in 2012.

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as "Freaks" in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics , but the series never surfaced there . [1] With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112 , to become the John Byrne's Next Men series. Two characters from the "Freaks" artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine (aka "Jazz") and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four–part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54–57 (Sept.–Dec. 1991), later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne's Next Men #0 (Feb. 1992). The series ran until issue #30 (Dec. 1994) [2] and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a "sort of smell" of being a super-hero book. [3] In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as " thought-bubbles " and sound-effects.


John Bennett, portrayed by Matt McGorry , is a former Correctional Officer at Litchfield Penitentiary . He is from the Poughkeepsie, New York area. He is the father of Daya's daughter, Armaria , and his current whereabouts are unknown.

John Bennett has short dark-brown hair and is mostly seen in his CO uniform in the episodes. However, at home, he is seen wearing more casual attire, such as when he came to Cesar's house to inform him of his and Daya's engagement. He has a prosthetic left leg.

Bennett is revealed to have been a corporal in the United States Army prior to working at Litchfield. He was on a tour of duty in Afghanistan. He tosses a bottle of water to an Afghan attaché named Farzad. He asks the attache why his three partners look nauseated and upset, and is informed that the other three Afghan attachés believe all the soldiers at the camp are "boy kiss boy" (homosexual) after seeing the soldiers engaging in choreographed song and dance while filming a homoerotic parody video. Bennett unwittingly confirms that he can see how they think the soldiers are gay.

On Sunday, the GLOW actress hit the SAG Awards red carpet as she was nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series. However, as brother-in-law James Franco has recently been accused of sexual misconduct by several women , Brie was inundated with questions about the controversy.

While Alison's Netflix hit is all about female empowerment, she's also incredibly close to husband Dave Franco 's family. Thus, we can only imagine how torn the Mad Men alum feels during this time.

Thankfully, Alison didn't dodge the question as she addressed the alleged misconduct with Giuliana Rancic . The 35-year-old shared:

John Byrne's Next Men (also known as Next Men or JBNM ) is an American comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne . The first volume of the series was published by Dark Horse Comics between 1991 and 1995. A nine–issue miniseries was published by IDW Publishing in 2010 and 2011, followed by another series titled Next Men: Aftermath in 2012.

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as "Freaks" in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics , but the series never surfaced there . [1] With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112 , to become the John Byrne's Next Men series. Two characters from the "Freaks" artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine (aka "Jazz") and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four–part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54–57 (Sept.–Dec. 1991), later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne's Next Men #0 (Feb. 1992). The series ran until issue #30 (Dec. 1994) [2] and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a "sort of smell" of being a super-hero book. [3] In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as " thought-bubbles " and sound-effects.


John Bennett, portrayed by Matt McGorry , is a former Correctional Officer at Litchfield Penitentiary . He is from the Poughkeepsie, New York area. He is the father of Daya's daughter, Armaria , and his current whereabouts are unknown.

John Bennett has short dark-brown hair and is mostly seen in his CO uniform in the episodes. However, at home, he is seen wearing more casual attire, such as when he came to Cesar's house to inform him of his and Daya's engagement. He has a prosthetic left leg.

Bennett is revealed to have been a corporal in the United States Army prior to working at Litchfield. He was on a tour of duty in Afghanistan. He tosses a bottle of water to an Afghan attaché named Farzad. He asks the attache why his three partners look nauseated and upset, and is informed that the other three Afghan attachés believe all the soldiers at the camp are "boy kiss boy" (homosexual) after seeing the soldiers engaging in choreographed song and dance while filming a homoerotic parody video. Bennett unwittingly confirms that he can see how they think the soldiers are gay.

John Byrne's Next Men (also known as Next Men or JBNM ) is an American comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne . The first volume of the series was published by Dark Horse Comics between 1991 and 1995. A nine–issue miniseries was published by IDW Publishing in 2010 and 2011, followed by another series titled Next Men: Aftermath in 2012.

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as "Freaks" in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics , but the series never surfaced there . [1] With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112 , to become the John Byrne's Next Men series. Two characters from the "Freaks" artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine (aka "Jazz") and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four–part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54–57 (Sept.–Dec. 1991), later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne's Next Men #0 (Feb. 1992). The series ran until issue #30 (Dec. 1994) [2] and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a "sort of smell" of being a super-hero book. [3] In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as " thought-bubbles " and sound-effects.

John Byrne s Next Men 7 (Sep 1992, Dark Horse) | eBay


John Byrne s Next Men No. 23: John Byrne: Amazon.com: Books

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