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Manual osteopaths identify, assess, and treat the body’s structures and rhythms using a gentle, hands-on approach. This fundamental technique is called osteopathic palpation. Manual osteopaths develop a very sensitive sense of touch to master osteopathic palpation. Osteopathic palpation is what makes manual osteopathy different from other forms of therapy.

Manual Osteopaths use this technique to reduce muscle spasms near a joint, ease neurological irritations around a joint, make joints more mobile and to reduce pain and discomfort.  The articular technique involves gently moving 2 joint surfaces.  Before doing this, manual osteopaths carefully prepare the soft tissues around the treatment area.  They also move the patient into a position that will minimize, or eliminate the energy and force needed to perform the manoever.  Many patients find this technique less forceful than joint manipulations.

Manual osteopaths use visceral manipulation to treat organs and viscera of the body, including the liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, pancreas, intestines, bladder and uterus. Patients may feel pain in one or more of these organs, or the viscera may be less pliable than it should be. Manual osteopaths gently move the structures themselves and the fascia (connective tissue) that surrounds them to restore full movement.

In Canada osteopathic manual therapists undertake a minimum of 4 years after having already completed a degree in a health related area.

Biological health sciences (anatomy, histology, physiology, kinesiology, pathology, neurology etc) Medical Diagnosis (differential diagnosis, symptomatolgy, dermatology orthopedics and manual skill) Comprehensive clinical training (1500 supervised clinical hours)

Osteopathic manual therapy in Canada is undergoing a growth phase at present with a push for federal wide regulation. Nearly all provinces have an association that is a member of the Canadian Federation of Osteopathy. Only fully qualified osteopathic manual therapists can become members of these provincial bodies. They provide training, support and best practice guidelines for all member therapists.

The other benefit is that once proper motion and muscle strength is restored to the whole body, not just the spine, the pain rarely returns, and if it does can usually be resolved with one or 2 treatments. This means that the patient does not require repeated treatment indefinitely.

As a Board Certified Internal Medicine physician, I am also able to identify and properly treat pain that is not due to muscles or joints. Thus the patient is going to be sent to the proper specialists if the pain is not treatable by OMT. I can also perform joint injections, Trigger point injections, and Prolotherapy if necessary.

Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Manual osteopaths identify, assess, and treat the body’s structures and rhythms using a gentle, hands-on approach. This fundamental technique is called osteopathic palpation. Manual osteopaths develop a very sensitive sense of touch to master osteopathic palpation. Osteopathic palpation is what makes manual osteopathy different from other forms of therapy.

Manual Osteopaths use this technique to reduce muscle spasms near a joint, ease neurological irritations around a joint, make joints more mobile and to reduce pain and discomfort.  The articular technique involves gently moving 2 joint surfaces.  Before doing this, manual osteopaths carefully prepare the soft tissues around the treatment area.  They also move the patient into a position that will minimize, or eliminate the energy and force needed to perform the manoever.  Many patients find this technique less forceful than joint manipulations.

Manual osteopaths use visceral manipulation to treat organs and viscera of the body, including the liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, pancreas, intestines, bladder and uterus. Patients may feel pain in one or more of these organs, or the viscera may be less pliable than it should be. Manual osteopaths gently move the structures themselves and the fascia (connective tissue) that surrounds them to restore full movement.

Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Manual osteopaths identify, assess, and treat the body’s structures and rhythms using a gentle, hands-on approach. This fundamental technique is called osteopathic palpation. Manual osteopaths develop a very sensitive sense of touch to master osteopathic palpation. Osteopathic palpation is what makes manual osteopathy different from other forms of therapy.

Manual Osteopaths use this technique to reduce muscle spasms near a joint, ease neurological irritations around a joint, make joints more mobile and to reduce pain and discomfort.  The articular technique involves gently moving 2 joint surfaces.  Before doing this, manual osteopaths carefully prepare the soft tissues around the treatment area.  They also move the patient into a position that will minimize, or eliminate the energy and force needed to perform the manoever.  Many patients find this technique less forceful than joint manipulations.

Manual osteopaths use visceral manipulation to treat organs and viscera of the body, including the liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, pancreas, intestines, bladder and uterus. Patients may feel pain in one or more of these organs, or the viscera may be less pliable than it should be. Manual osteopaths gently move the structures themselves and the fascia (connective tissue) that surrounds them to restore full movement.

In Canada osteopathic manual therapists undertake a minimum of 4 years after having already completed a degree in a health related area.

Biological health sciences (anatomy, histology, physiology, kinesiology, pathology, neurology etc) Medical Diagnosis (differential diagnosis, symptomatolgy, dermatology orthopedics and manual skill) Comprehensive clinical training (1500 supervised clinical hours)

Osteopathic manual therapy in Canada is undergoing a growth phase at present with a push for federal wide regulation. Nearly all provinces have an association that is a member of the Canadian Federation of Osteopathy. Only fully qualified osteopathic manual therapists can become members of these provincial bodies. They provide training, support and best practice guidelines for all member therapists.

Ontario Association of Osteopathic Manual Practitioners.


What is Osteopathic Manual Therapy? - Alberta Association.

Posted by 2018 article

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