The Pilgrim's Progress is an opera by Ralph Vaughan Williams , based on John Bunyan 's allegory The Pilgrim's Progress . The composer himself described the work as a 'Morality' rather than an opera. Nonetheless, he intended the work to be performed on stage, rather than in a church or cathedral. Vaughan Williams himself prepared the libretto, with interpolations from the Bible and also text from his second wife, Ursula Wood. His changes to the story included altering the name of the central character from 'Christian' to 'Pilgrim', so as to universalise the spiritual message.

The first performance was at the Royal Opera House , Covent Garden on 26 April 1951. [4] The conductor was Leonard Hancock, whom Vaughan Williams had personally chosen to conduct the premiere, [5] and the director Nevill Coghill .

The Covent Garden performances were not a success, and the company dropped the opera from its repertoire in 1952. However, a student production at the University of Cambridge in 1954 met with greater approval from the composer, notably for the performance of John Noble as Pilgrim. [7] John Noble later recorded the role in the recording conducted by Sir Adrian Boult in 1970–71 (see Recordings below).

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The Pilgrim Progress is a reenactment of the procession to church for the 51 surviving Pilgrims of the first winter in 1621. The reenactment was instituted by the Town of Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1921 in honor of its Pilgrim founders. The march takes place the first 4 Fridays in August and also is an integral part of the Town’s celebration of Thanksgiving Day .

Each marcher represents one of the 51 survivors of the first harsh winter of 1620–1621. The historical setting for this reenactment is taken from the account of a Dutch visitor, Isaack de Rasieres , secretary of the Dutch colony of New Netherland , who visited Plymouth in 1627 and described the Pilgrims gather for worship thus:

“Upon the hill they have a large square house…the lower part they use for their church where they preach on Sundays and the usual holidays. They assemble by beat of drum, each with musket or firelock, in front of the captain’s door; they have their cloaks on, and place themselves in order, three abreast and are led by a sergeant without beat of drum. Behind comes the Governor, in a long robe; beside him on the right hand comes the preacher with his cloak on, and on the left hand, the captain with his side arms and cloak on and with a small cane in his hand; and so they march in good order, and each sets his arms down near him. Thus they are constantly on their guard day and night.”

The unusual spelling and punctuation are not errors: they are the original style of Bunyan himself. See also: The Little Pilgrim (a poem inspired by this work)

This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

The Pilgrim's Progress is an opera by Ralph Vaughan Williams , based on John Bunyan 's allegory The Pilgrim's Progress . The composer himself described the work as a 'Morality' rather than an opera. Nonetheless, he intended the work to be performed on stage, rather than in a church or cathedral. Vaughan Williams himself prepared the libretto, with interpolations from the Bible and also text from his second wife, Ursula Wood. His changes to the story included altering the name of the central character from 'Christian' to 'Pilgrim', so as to universalise the spiritual message.

The first performance was at the Royal Opera House , Covent Garden on 26 April 1951. [4] The conductor was Leonard Hancock, whom Vaughan Williams had personally chosen to conduct the premiere, [5] and the director Nevill Coghill .

The Covent Garden performances were not a success, and the company dropped the opera from its repertoire in 1952. However, a student production at the University of Cambridge in 1954 met with greater approval from the composer, notably for the performance of John Noble as Pilgrim. [7] John Noble later recorded the role in the recording conducted by Sir Adrian Boult in 1970–71 (see Recordings below).

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

The Pilgrim Progress is a reenactment of the procession to church for the 51 surviving Pilgrims of the first winter in 1621. The reenactment was instituted by the Town of Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1921 in honor of its Pilgrim founders. The march takes place the first 4 Fridays in August and also is an integral part of the Town’s celebration of Thanksgiving Day .

Each marcher represents one of the 51 survivors of the first harsh winter of 1620–1621. The historical setting for this reenactment is taken from the account of a Dutch visitor, Isaack de Rasieres , secretary of the Dutch colony of New Netherland , who visited Plymouth in 1627 and described the Pilgrims gather for worship thus:

“Upon the hill they have a large square house…the lower part they use for their church where they preach on Sundays and the usual holidays. They assemble by beat of drum, each with musket or firelock, in front of the captain’s door; they have their cloaks on, and place themselves in order, three abreast and are led by a sergeant without beat of drum. Behind comes the Governor, in a long robe; beside him on the right hand comes the preacher with his cloak on, and on the left hand, the captain with his side arms and cloak on and with a small cane in his hand; and so they march in good order, and each sets his arms down near him. Thus they are constantly on their guard day and night.”

The Pilgrim's Progress is an opera by Ralph Vaughan Williams , based on John Bunyan 's allegory The Pilgrim's Progress . The composer himself described the work as a 'Morality' rather than an opera. Nonetheless, he intended the work to be performed on stage, rather than in a church or cathedral. Vaughan Williams himself prepared the libretto, with interpolations from the Bible and also text from his second wife, Ursula Wood. His changes to the story included altering the name of the central character from 'Christian' to 'Pilgrim', so as to universalise the spiritual message.

The first performance was at the Royal Opera House , Covent Garden on 26 April 1951. [4] The conductor was Leonard Hancock, whom Vaughan Williams had personally chosen to conduct the premiere, [5] and the director Nevill Coghill .

The Covent Garden performances were not a success, and the company dropped the opera from its repertoire in 1952. However, a student production at the University of Cambridge in 1954 met with greater approval from the composer, notably for the performance of John Noble as Pilgrim. [7] John Noble later recorded the role in the recording conducted by Sir Adrian Boult in 1970–71 (see Recordings below).

The Pilgrim's Progress is an opera by Ralph Vaughan Williams , based on John Bunyan 's allegory The Pilgrim's Progress . The composer himself described the work as a 'Morality' rather than an opera. Nonetheless, he intended the work to be performed on stage, rather than in a church or cathedral. Vaughan Williams himself prepared the libretto, with interpolations from the Bible and also text from his second wife, Ursula Wood. His changes to the story included altering the name of the central character from 'Christian' to 'Pilgrim', so as to universalise the spiritual message.

The first performance was at the Royal Opera House , Covent Garden on 26 April 1951. [4] The conductor was Leonard Hancock, whom Vaughan Williams had personally chosen to conduct the premiere, [5] and the director Nevill Coghill .

The Covent Garden performances were not a success, and the company dropped the opera from its repertoire in 1952. However, a student production at the University of Cambridge in 1954 met with greater approval from the composer, notably for the performance of John Noble as Pilgrim. [7] John Noble later recorded the role in the recording conducted by Sir Adrian Boult in 1970–71 (see Recordings below).

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

Pilgrim s Progress - Christian Classics Ethereal Library


SparkNotes: The Pilgrim’s Progress

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