The Pontiac Grand Prix and Buick Century and Regal were redesigned for the 1997 model year, and the Oldsmobile Intrigue was introduced in the 1998 model year.

The Intrigue was dropped after the 2002 model year, the Regal after the 2004 model year, and the Century after the 2005 model year. The Grand Prix was redesigned for the 2004 model year.

Measures taken from the neck, chest, and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the dummy's head that occurred when the head moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia indicate that injuries to the lower leg would be possible. Head acceleration from the B-pillar hit was low.

Smaller cars, particularly intermediates, were far more important to Buick's fortunes in the '80s. For 1981 these comprised the workaday Regal coupes and a mostly carryover group of Century sedans and wagons. All continued the 1978 A-body design that was renamed G-body for '82, when the Centurys became Regals and Buick's 4.1-liter V-6 replaced a 4.3 V-8 option.

Model-year volume was some 384,500 for 1981 and over 328,000 for '82, not bad for two very difficult industry years. Production eased to some 226,000 for 1983-84, by which time four-speed automatic transmissions had been adopted as a much better bet for improved mileage.

Meantime, Buick had introduced the first front-drive Century, a notchback coupe and sedan built on the new 1982 A-body used by sister Chevy, Olds, and Pontiac models. Like them, this Century was just a "deluxe" X-car with more expansive sheet-metal and plusher interiors on the same 104.9-inch wheelbase. Initial engine choices were a 2.5-liter Pontiac four; a new 3.0-liter Buick V-6 (destroked from 3.8); and a 4.3-liter Olds diesel V-6.

It's now at https://accounts.gm.com/gmappcloud/gmoc/sso.do?returnUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fmy.buick.com%3A443%2Flearn&entityID=my.buick.com.v2&TARGET=https%3A%2F%2Fmy.buick.com%3A443%2Flearn .

The Pontiac Grand Prix and Buick Century and Regal were redesigned for the 1997 model year, and the Oldsmobile Intrigue was introduced in the 1998 model year.

The Intrigue was dropped after the 2002 model year, the Regal after the 2004 model year, and the Century after the 2005 model year. The Grand Prix was redesigned for the 2004 model year.

Measures taken from the neck, chest, and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the dummy's head that occurred when the head moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia indicate that injuries to the lower leg would be possible. Head acceleration from the B-pillar hit was low.

The Pontiac Grand Prix and Buick Century and Regal were redesigned for the 1997 model year, and the Oldsmobile Intrigue was introduced in the 1998 model year.

The Intrigue was dropped after the 2002 model year, the Regal after the 2004 model year, and the Century after the 2005 model year. The Grand Prix was redesigned for the 2004 model year.

Measures taken from the neck, chest, and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the dummy's head that occurred when the head moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia indicate that injuries to the lower leg would be possible. Head acceleration from the B-pillar hit was low.

Smaller cars, particularly intermediates, were far more important to Buick's fortunes in the '80s. For 1981 these comprised the workaday Regal coupes and a mostly carryover group of Century sedans and wagons. All continued the 1978 A-body design that was renamed G-body for '82, when the Centurys became Regals and Buick's 4.1-liter V-6 replaced a 4.3 V-8 option.

Model-year volume was some 384,500 for 1981 and over 328,000 for '82, not bad for two very difficult industry years. Production eased to some 226,000 for 1983-84, by which time four-speed automatic transmissions had been adopted as a much better bet for improved mileage.

Meantime, Buick had introduced the first front-drive Century, a notchback coupe and sedan built on the new 1982 A-body used by sister Chevy, Olds, and Pontiac models. Like them, this Century was just a "deluxe" X-car with more expansive sheet-metal and plusher interiors on the same 104.9-inch wheelbase. Initial engine choices were a 2.5-liter Pontiac four; a new 3.0-liter Buick V-6 (destroked from 3.8); and a 4.3-liter Olds diesel V-6.

The Pontiac Grand Prix and Buick Century and Regal were redesigned for the 1997 model year, and the Oldsmobile Intrigue was introduced in the 1998 model year.

The Intrigue was dropped after the 2002 model year, the Regal after the 2004 model year, and the Century after the 2005 model year. The Grand Prix was redesigned for the 2004 model year.

Measures taken from the neck, chest, and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the dummy's head that occurred when the head moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia indicate that injuries to the lower leg would be possible. Head acceleration from the B-pillar hit was low.

Smaller cars, particularly intermediates, were far more important to Buick's fortunes in the '80s. For 1981 these comprised the workaday Regal coupes and a mostly carryover group of Century sedans and wagons. All continued the 1978 A-body design that was renamed G-body for '82, when the Centurys became Regals and Buick's 4.1-liter V-6 replaced a 4.3 V-8 option.

Model-year volume was some 384,500 for 1981 and over 328,000 for '82, not bad for two very difficult industry years. Production eased to some 226,000 for 1983-84, by which time four-speed automatic transmissions had been adopted as a much better bet for improved mileage.

Meantime, Buick had introduced the first front-drive Century, a notchback coupe and sedan built on the new 1982 A-body used by sister Chevy, Olds, and Pontiac models. Like them, this Century was just a "deluxe" X-car with more expansive sheet-metal and plusher interiors on the same 104.9-inch wheelbase. Initial engine choices were a 2.5-liter Pontiac four; a new 3.0-liter Buick V-6 (destroked from 3.8); and a 4.3-liter Olds diesel V-6.

It's now at https://accounts.gm.com/gmappcloud/gmoc/sso.do?returnUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fmy.buick.com%3A443%2Flearn&entityID=my.buick.com.v2&TARGET=https%3A%2F%2Fmy.buick.com%3A443%2Flearn .

Buick Century is the model name used by Buick for a line of upscale performance cars from 1936 to 1942 and 1954 to 1958, and from 1973 to 2005 for a mid-size car.

The model name Century came about when Buick was designing its first production automobile capable of reaching a speed of 100 mph. The division needed to come up with a name. One of the Buick executives had returned from a recent trip to Britain, and told the other executives that the British referred to going 100 mph as "doing the century". The executives liked the Century name and it stuck. [ citation needed ]

Originally the Series 60 had a six-cylinder 331.4 cu in (5,431 cc) engine, developing 99 bhp at 2,800 rpm. It had, at the beginning of the generation, a full length running board denoting the top model for Buick at the time. In 1930, GM built 38,180 cars. The bodystyles available were torpedo , sedan, coupe, and roadster convertible , using GM's " B-body " platform.

Buick Luxury Cars, Crossovers, SUVs & Sedans | Buick


Buick Century - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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