Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive , a 501(c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form.
Other projects include the Wayback Machine , archive.org and archive-it.org

When last we heard from Ruth Reichl — wild-haired cook, esteemed food critic, passion-prone chomper of life, mistress of prose so juicy you want to suck the marrow out of her sentences
well, when last we heard from her, in her best-selling 1998 memoir Tender at the Bone , Reichl had narrowly missed driving off San Francisco’s Bay Bridge.

Panic attacks were plaguing her. Then again, given the flamboyant unwieldiness of her life — daughter of an energy-consuming manic-depressive mother, child of hippie days in Greenwich Village and Berkeley commune resident, boisterous experimenter in the kitchen, wife of a peripatetic artist — panic attacks were small potatoes. But readers drawn to her warmth and zest wished her happiness. Anyone who loves food and feeding so generously deserves affection and support.

The recklessly aroused Reichl embarks on a swooning tasting tour of Paris with her lover. (”Each forkful,” she writes of perfect scrambled eggs, ”was like biting off a piece of the sun.”) She returns to California, meets Wolfgang Puck and Michael McCarty and all the inspired young chefs just starting an American food revolution in Los Angeles. Her writing career advances. Her marriage erodes. She travels exotically, tastes everything, drinks happily, eats joyously. Her mother demands, intrudes, needles, nakedly needs. Reichl wants children. She meets another man…

Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive , a 501(c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form.
Other projects include the Wayback Machine , archive.org and archive-it.org

When last we heard from Ruth Reichl — wild-haired cook, esteemed food critic, passion-prone chomper of life, mistress of prose so juicy you want to suck the marrow out of her sentences
well, when last we heard from her, in her best-selling 1998 memoir Tender at the Bone , Reichl had narrowly missed driving off San Francisco’s Bay Bridge.

Panic attacks were plaguing her. Then again, given the flamboyant unwieldiness of her life — daughter of an energy-consuming manic-depressive mother, child of hippie days in Greenwich Village and Berkeley commune resident, boisterous experimenter in the kitchen, wife of a peripatetic artist — panic attacks were small potatoes. But readers drawn to her warmth and zest wished her happiness. Anyone who loves food and feeding so generously deserves affection and support.

The recklessly aroused Reichl embarks on a swooning tasting tour of Paris with her lover. (”Each forkful,” she writes of perfect scrambled eggs, ”was like biting off a piece of the sun.”) She returns to California, meets Wolfgang Puck and Michael McCarty and all the inspired young chefs just starting an American food revolution in Los Angeles. Her writing career advances. Her marriage erodes. She travels exotically, tastes everything, drinks happily, eats joyously. Her mother demands, intrudes, needles, nakedly needs. Reichl wants children. She meets another man…

Ruth Reichl began cooking at the age of seven. It was pure self-defense; her mother, who was affectionately known as ‘the Queen of Mold,’ inadvertently poisoned people, and Ruth felt she could do a slightly better job. Trained as an art historian, she ended up following her passion for food. She had a modest restaurant in Berkeley, then became the restaurant critic of The Los Angeles Times and then the New York Times before being named Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine . She has written four memoirs and three cookbooks, but Delicious! is her first novel.

She lives in New York with her husband and son - and deeply regrets that she neglected to give them any reason to learn to cook.

He worked his way up to 'line cook' and then left New York to learn from the very teachers who had taught his teacher: preparing game with Marco Pierre White, making pasta in a hillside trattoria, finally becoming apprentice to a Dante-spouting butcher in Chianti.

Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive , a 501(c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form.
Other projects include the Wayback Machine , archive.org and archive-it.org

Comfort Me With Apples by Peter De Vries - Goodreads


Comfort Me with Apples: More Adventures at the Table by.

Posted by 2018 article

511-tuy0NYL