A.K.A.: fish hawk, fishing eagle
Field marks: Large, eagle-sized, fish-eating raptor, with long, narrow, crooked-wings, and long legs. Generally white below and dark above, with a white head, dark eye-stripe, and dark, banded tail.
Flight behavior: Typically migrates alone, sometimes in flocks of 2-4 birds. Osprey wings are sharply angled at the wrist, resulting in an “M” shaped silhouette like that of a gull. Often migrates late in the afternoon.

67-year annual average: 374
1992-2001: 575 
Record year: 872 (1990)
Best chance to see: Mid- to late September.
Longterm trends: Increasing from 1930s through 1990s, possibly in response to increasing numbers of reservoirs and beaver ponds in North America. Reintroduced in many areas including Pennsylvania in the 1980s. 

MARTELL, M.S., C.J. HENNY, P.E. NYE, AND M.J. SOLENSKY. 2001. Fall migration routes, timing, and wintering sites of North American Ospreys as determined by satellite telemetry. Condor 103: 715-724.

I started visiting Mud Lake in August 2006 as a relatively new birder with a life list of about 57 birds. I was awed the first time I went, for there were so many birds flying back and forth in the trees above Cassels Street and lurking in the thickets bordering the lake that I didn’t know where to look first, nor how to identify most of them! Since then I have added a large number of species to my life list – many of them seen for the first time at Mud Lake – and have counted over 130 species in the conservation area.

The variety of habitats and its position as an isolated greenspace in the middle of the city provide not only food and shelter to large numbers of tired migrants, but also nesting habitat to over 50 different species of birds as well as many other types of wildlife. Many different mammals can be found here year round, and in the warmer months, Mud Lake is known for its large turtle population as well as its variety of odonates. A total of 69 species of damselflies and dragonflies have been found here to date, making it one of the most diverse areas in the city.

By late April the resident turtles will have emerged from their hibernation. Look for them basking on logs along the southern shore of the lake. A small bridge crosses over a bay where over 100 turtles may be seen basking on warm, sunny, spring days; while the vast majority are Painted Turtles, sometimes large Snapping Turtles or the endangered Blanding’s Turtle may be spotted among the smaller turtles. Look for Wood Ducks and muskrats in this area as well.

House Sparrows , House Wrens , mice , raccoons , rats , red squirrels , snakes , starlings , woodpeckers . Cowbird (egg replaced). Less likely: bears , bluebirds , blue or scrub jays , chickadees , chipmunks , crows or ravens , flying squirrels , fox squirrels , grackles , gray squirrels , ground squirrels , hawks , human vandal s, magpies , opossums , owls , rats , skunks , Tree Swallow , violet-green swallows , weasels , egg eating . Eggs thrown on the ground may be eaten by other predators.

Nest abandoned (typically chickadee or titmouse , or old mouse nest , occasionally bluebird, flying squirrel), bumblebee buzzing inside nest or flying around. There may be a ball of pollen with eggs and a " honeypot " (about 1/4 size of chickadee egg, popped open on one end.) See photos .

Put nest with bumblebee, pollen ball and honeypot on the ground (away from the box.) May need to put plastic bag over box and scare bee out into it first. Or put up another box and let the bumblebee stay. Or eject the bumblebee from the nest, and poke around in the middle of the nest with a stick or a pencil to destroy the honeypot. Chickadees generally will not return to a failed nest site so may not come back to use the nest if they can find another cavity.

This list of birds of Georgia includes species documented in the U.S. state of Georgia and accepted by the Checklist and Records Committee of the Georgia Ornithological Society (GOSRC). As of July 2016, there are 422 species definitively included in the official list. Seven additional species are on the list but classed as provisional (see definitions below). [1] [2] Of the 422 species, 97 are classed as rare, four have been introduced to North America, and one is extinct . (Another, the ivory-billed woodpecker , is classed by the GOSRC as rare, but is arguably extinct. See its species account for the controversy surrounding this bird.)

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds , 7th edition through the 58th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). [3] [4] Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list .

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in Georgia as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags are used to designate some species:

A.K.A.: fish hawk, fishing eagle
Field marks: Large, eagle-sized, fish-eating raptor, with long, narrow, crooked-wings, and long legs. Generally white below and dark above, with a white head, dark eye-stripe, and dark, banded tail.
Flight behavior: Typically migrates alone, sometimes in flocks of 2-4 birds. Osprey wings are sharply angled at the wrist, resulting in an “M” shaped silhouette like that of a gull. Often migrates late in the afternoon.

67-year annual average: 374
1992-2001: 575 
Record year: 872 (1990)
Best chance to see: Mid- to late September.
Longterm trends: Increasing from 1930s through 1990s, possibly in response to increasing numbers of reservoirs and beaver ponds in North America. Reintroduced in many areas including Pennsylvania in the 1980s. 

MARTELL, M.S., C.J. HENNY, P.E. NYE, AND M.J. SOLENSKY. 2001. Fall migration routes, timing, and wintering sites of North American Ospreys as determined by satellite telemetry. Condor 103: 715-724.

A.K.A.: fish hawk, fishing eagle
Field marks: Large, eagle-sized, fish-eating raptor, with long, narrow, crooked-wings, and long legs. Generally white below and dark above, with a white head, dark eye-stripe, and dark, banded tail.
Flight behavior: Typically migrates alone, sometimes in flocks of 2-4 birds. Osprey wings are sharply angled at the wrist, resulting in an “M” shaped silhouette like that of a gull. Often migrates late in the afternoon.

67-year annual average: 374
1992-2001: 575 
Record year: 872 (1990)
Best chance to see: Mid- to late September.
Longterm trends: Increasing from 1930s through 1990s, possibly in response to increasing numbers of reservoirs and beaver ponds in North America. Reintroduced in many areas including Pennsylvania in the 1980s. 

MARTELL, M.S., C.J. HENNY, P.E. NYE, AND M.J. SOLENSKY. 2001. Fall migration routes, timing, and wintering sites of North American Ospreys as determined by satellite telemetry. Condor 103: 715-724.

I started visiting Mud Lake in August 2006 as a relatively new birder with a life list of about 57 birds. I was awed the first time I went, for there were so many birds flying back and forth in the trees above Cassels Street and lurking in the thickets bordering the lake that I didn’t know where to look first, nor how to identify most of them! Since then I have added a large number of species to my life list – many of them seen for the first time at Mud Lake – and have counted over 130 species in the conservation area.

The variety of habitats and its position as an isolated greenspace in the middle of the city provide not only food and shelter to large numbers of tired migrants, but also nesting habitat to over 50 different species of birds as well as many other types of wildlife. Many different mammals can be found here year round, and in the warmer months, Mud Lake is known for its large turtle population as well as its variety of odonates. A total of 69 species of damselflies and dragonflies have been found here to date, making it one of the most diverse areas in the city.

By late April the resident turtles will have emerged from their hibernation. Look for them basking on logs along the southern shore of the lake. A small bridge crosses over a bay where over 100 turtles may be seen basking on warm, sunny, spring days; while the vast majority are Painted Turtles, sometimes large Snapping Turtles or the endangered Blanding’s Turtle may be spotted among the smaller turtles. Look for Wood Ducks and muskrats in this area as well.

House Sparrows , House Wrens , mice , raccoons , rats , red squirrels , snakes , starlings , woodpeckers . Cowbird (egg replaced). Less likely: bears , bluebirds , blue or scrub jays , chickadees , chipmunks , crows or ravens , flying squirrels , fox squirrels , grackles , gray squirrels , ground squirrels , hawks , human vandal s, magpies , opossums , owls , rats , skunks , Tree Swallow , violet-green swallows , weasels , egg eating . Eggs thrown on the ground may be eaten by other predators.

Nest abandoned (typically chickadee or titmouse , or old mouse nest , occasionally bluebird, flying squirrel), bumblebee buzzing inside nest or flying around. There may be a ball of pollen with eggs and a " honeypot " (about 1/4 size of chickadee egg, popped open on one end.) See photos .

Put nest with bumblebee, pollen ball and honeypot on the ground (away from the box.) May need to put plastic bag over box and scare bee out into it first. Or put up another box and let the bumblebee stay. Or eject the bumblebee from the nest, and poke around in the middle of the nest with a stick or a pencil to destroy the honeypot. Chickadees generally will not return to a failed nest site so may not come back to use the nest if they can find another cavity.

A.K.A.: fish hawk, fishing eagle
Field marks: Large, eagle-sized, fish-eating raptor, with long, narrow, crooked-wings, and long legs. Generally white below and dark above, with a white head, dark eye-stripe, and dark, banded tail.
Flight behavior: Typically migrates alone, sometimes in flocks of 2-4 birds. Osprey wings are sharply angled at the wrist, resulting in an “M” shaped silhouette like that of a gull. Often migrates late in the afternoon.

67-year annual average: 374
1992-2001: 575 
Record year: 872 (1990)
Best chance to see: Mid- to late September.
Longterm trends: Increasing from 1930s through 1990s, possibly in response to increasing numbers of reservoirs and beaver ponds in North America. Reintroduced in many areas including Pennsylvania in the 1980s. 

MARTELL, M.S., C.J. HENNY, P.E. NYE, AND M.J. SOLENSKY. 2001. Fall migration routes, timing, and wintering sites of North American Ospreys as determined by satellite telemetry. Condor 103: 715-724.

I started visiting Mud Lake in August 2006 as a relatively new birder with a life list of about 57 birds. I was awed the first time I went, for there were so many birds flying back and forth in the trees above Cassels Street and lurking in the thickets bordering the lake that I didn’t know where to look first, nor how to identify most of them! Since then I have added a large number of species to my life list – many of them seen for the first time at Mud Lake – and have counted over 130 species in the conservation area.

The variety of habitats and its position as an isolated greenspace in the middle of the city provide not only food and shelter to large numbers of tired migrants, but also nesting habitat to over 50 different species of birds as well as many other types of wildlife. Many different mammals can be found here year round, and in the warmer months, Mud Lake is known for its large turtle population as well as its variety of odonates. A total of 69 species of damselflies and dragonflies have been found here to date, making it one of the most diverse areas in the city.

By late April the resident turtles will have emerged from their hibernation. Look for them basking on logs along the southern shore of the lake. A small bridge crosses over a bay where over 100 turtles may be seen basking on warm, sunny, spring days; while the vast majority are Painted Turtles, sometimes large Snapping Turtles or the endangered Blanding’s Turtle may be spotted among the smaller turtles. Look for Wood Ducks and muskrats in this area as well.

Hawk Among the Sparrows - Dean McLaughlin - Google Books


Hawk Among the Sparrows: Dean McLaughlin. - amazon.com

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