The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

ROME — Amidst complex security procedures, the Holy Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis begins Tuesday when the pontiff opens the Holy Door in St. Peter’s Basilica, symbolizing that a jubilee is underway.

At Francis’ request, Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will participate in the ceremony, marking the first time that two pontiffs together have launched a jubilee year.

In a recent interview, Francis said the Holy Year is a response to the world’s need for a “revolution of tenderness” from which “justice and all the rest derives.”

In 1919 “Betheden” in Ashgrove, once the residence of Mr W. J. Trouton, a well-known chemist, was purchased by Archbishop James Duhig. The Archbishop had the house renovated and the largest room was prepared for a chapel. It was dedicated by Archbishop Duhig and Archbishop Redwood (visiting from New Zealand) on 19th January, 1919.

On the following Sunday, 120 were present in the chapel when Archbishop Duhig celebrated Mass. The congregation was promised there would be Mass each Sunday. Initially the people were looked after by clergy from the Cathedral. A collection was already underway for the building of a parish church.

In 1921, the foundation stone of the church/school was blessed on the site of the present church. Fr Lalor was appointed the first Parish Priest. Accommodation for Fr Lalor was not available, so in the beginning the church also doubled as the presbytery. Then, when “Grantuly” was purchased, he stayed there until the presbytery was opened on 3rd May, 1925. Unfortunately he was not in residence for very long, as he was killed in a car accident on Waterworks Road on 25th August, 1925.

The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

ROME — Amidst complex security procedures, the Holy Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis begins Tuesday when the pontiff opens the Holy Door in St. Peter’s Basilica, symbolizing that a jubilee is underway.

At Francis’ request, Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will participate in the ceremony, marking the first time that two pontiffs together have launched a jubilee year.

In a recent interview, Francis said the Holy Year is a response to the world’s need for a “revolution of tenderness” from which “justice and all the rest derives.”

In 1919 “Betheden” in Ashgrove, once the residence of Mr W. J. Trouton, a well-known chemist, was purchased by Archbishop James Duhig. The Archbishop had the house renovated and the largest room was prepared for a chapel. It was dedicated by Archbishop Duhig and Archbishop Redwood (visiting from New Zealand) on 19th January, 1919.

On the following Sunday, 120 were present in the chapel when Archbishop Duhig celebrated Mass. The congregation was promised there would be Mass each Sunday. Initially the people were looked after by clergy from the Cathedral. A collection was already underway for the building of a parish church.

In 1921, the foundation stone of the church/school was blessed on the site of the present church. Fr Lalor was appointed the first Parish Priest. Accommodation for Fr Lalor was not available, so in the beginning the church also doubled as the presbytery. Then, when “Grantuly” was purchased, he stayed there until the presbytery was opened on 3rd May, 1925. Unfortunately he was not in residence for very long, as he was killed in a car accident on Waterworks Road on 25th August, 1925.

I n the late Second-Temple Era, the custom of letting the land rest in each 7th year was an important tenet of Jewish law. Flavius Josephus, a priest-historian who lived in the first century CE, described the Jewish custom of observing the Sabbatical law in some detail. The writings of the rabbis and certain ancient contracts also make it clear that Jews living under the late Second Temple were careful to observe each of the Sabbatical years.

T he law concerning the keeping of a Sabbatical year was complied with at a national level. Throughout the territory of Judea, it would have been mandatory--as a tenet of the constitution--for farmers to observe each 7th year as a Sabbatical year. The requirement to celebrate Sabbatical years throughout Judea would have been in force until the Second Temple fell (in 70 CE).

S ome ancient sources tend to indicate that the late Second-Temple practice of observing 7th years sprang from an earlier practice of celebrating a 50-year cycle. It seems that after 7 sets of Sabbatical years had been celebrated, each 50th year (called the jubilee) was also celebrated. The more primal practice of celebrating 7 sets of 7 years and a jubilee year is described in biblical texts--as follows.

It's weird enough for Lance to be hardcore crushin' on one teammate, let alone two, let alone two in a goddamn relationship .

They've done what they can, the doctor says. They've stabilized him. He's been moved into the ICU. The next twenty-four to forty-eight hours are critical.

PROMPT: Derek is an elf sent to the "mortal world" to bring Christmas spirit back into the Stilinski family and accidentally falls in love with Stiles
He’s a senior Agent of Cheer, decorated numerous times by the Candy Cane Council for his work in bringing joy to the many jovially-challenged families during the jolly season. His attention to detail has been heralded as ‘heartwarming’, ‘inspiring’ and ‘hella swell’ by several respected trade publications.

The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

ROME — Amidst complex security procedures, the Holy Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis begins Tuesday when the pontiff opens the Holy Door in St. Peter’s Basilica, symbolizing that a jubilee is underway.

At Francis’ request, Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will participate in the ceremony, marking the first time that two pontiffs together have launched a jubilee year.

In a recent interview, Francis said the Holy Year is a response to the world’s need for a “revolution of tenderness” from which “justice and all the rest derives.”

The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

ROME — Amidst complex security procedures, the Holy Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis begins Tuesday when the pontiff opens the Holy Door in St. Peter’s Basilica, symbolizing that a jubilee is underway.

At Francis’ request, Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will participate in the ceremony, marking the first time that two pontiffs together have launched a jubilee year.

In a recent interview, Francis said the Holy Year is a response to the world’s need for a “revolution of tenderness” from which “justice and all the rest derives.”

In 1919 “Betheden” in Ashgrove, once the residence of Mr W. J. Trouton, a well-known chemist, was purchased by Archbishop James Duhig. The Archbishop had the house renovated and the largest room was prepared for a chapel. It was dedicated by Archbishop Duhig and Archbishop Redwood (visiting from New Zealand) on 19th January, 1919.

On the following Sunday, 120 were present in the chapel when Archbishop Duhig celebrated Mass. The congregation was promised there would be Mass each Sunday. Initially the people were looked after by clergy from the Cathedral. A collection was already underway for the building of a parish church.

In 1921, the foundation stone of the church/school was blessed on the site of the present church. Fr Lalor was appointed the first Parish Priest. Accommodation for Fr Lalor was not available, so in the beginning the church also doubled as the presbytery. Then, when “Grantuly” was purchased, he stayed there until the presbytery was opened on 3rd May, 1925. Unfortunately he was not in residence for very long, as he was killed in a car accident on Waterworks Road on 25th August, 1925.

I n the late Second-Temple Era, the custom of letting the land rest in each 7th year was an important tenet of Jewish law. Flavius Josephus, a priest-historian who lived in the first century CE, described the Jewish custom of observing the Sabbatical law in some detail. The writings of the rabbis and certain ancient contracts also make it clear that Jews living under the late Second Temple were careful to observe each of the Sabbatical years.

T he law concerning the keeping of a Sabbatical year was complied with at a national level. Throughout the territory of Judea, it would have been mandatory--as a tenet of the constitution--for farmers to observe each 7th year as a Sabbatical year. The requirement to celebrate Sabbatical years throughout Judea would have been in force until the Second Temple fell (in 70 CE).

S ome ancient sources tend to indicate that the late Second-Temple practice of observing 7th years sprang from an earlier practice of celebrating a 50-year cycle. It seems that after 7 sets of Sabbatical years had been celebrated, each 50th year (called the jubilee) was also celebrated. The more primal practice of celebrating 7 sets of 7 years and a jubilee year is described in biblical texts--as follows.

It's weird enough for Lance to be hardcore crushin' on one teammate, let alone two, let alone two in a goddamn relationship .

They've done what they can, the doctor says. They've stabilized him. He's been moved into the ICU. The next twenty-four to forty-eight hours are critical.

PROMPT: Derek is an elf sent to the "mortal world" to bring Christmas spirit back into the Stilinski family and accidentally falls in love with Stiles
He’s a senior Agent of Cheer, decorated numerous times by the Candy Cane Council for his work in bringing joy to the many jovially-challenged families during the jolly season. His attention to detail has been heralded as ‘heartwarming’, ‘inspiring’ and ‘hella swell’ by several respected trade publications.

We can envision a near future in which all American Theatre seasons are overflowing with works written and directed by women.

We can foresee LGBTQIA creators hired to write, direct, and choreograph in every theatre in the United States of America.

We plan to celebrate this vision with a Jubilee year in 2020, in which every theatre in the United States of America produces works by women, people of color, artists of varied physical and cognitive ability, and/or LGBTQIA artists.

The Queen has made a number of significant, memorable – and at times controversial – speeches during her 60-year reign.

From addressing the nation at the age of just 14 to a touching tribute to Prince Philip to mark their Golden Wedding anniversary, expressing her grief after the death of Princess Diana and speaking in Gaelic during her first Royal visit to Ireland, nearly every speech has marked a milestone in her reign.

“I am speaking to friends and companions who have shared with my sister and myself many a happy Children’s Hour. Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers. My sister Margaret and I feel so much for you, as we know from experience what it means to be away from those you love most of all.”

ROME — Amidst complex security procedures, the Holy Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis begins Tuesday when the pontiff opens the Holy Door in St. Peter’s Basilica, symbolizing that a jubilee is underway.

At Francis’ request, Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will participate in the ceremony, marking the first time that two pontiffs together have launched a jubilee year.

In a recent interview, Francis said the Holy Year is a response to the world’s need for a “revolution of tenderness” from which “justice and all the rest derives.”

In 1919 “Betheden” in Ashgrove, once the residence of Mr W. J. Trouton, a well-known chemist, was purchased by Archbishop James Duhig. The Archbishop had the house renovated and the largest room was prepared for a chapel. It was dedicated by Archbishop Duhig and Archbishop Redwood (visiting from New Zealand) on 19th January, 1919.

On the following Sunday, 120 were present in the chapel when Archbishop Duhig celebrated Mass. The congregation was promised there would be Mass each Sunday. Initially the people were looked after by clergy from the Cathedral. A collection was already underway for the building of a parish church.

In 1921, the foundation stone of the church/school was blessed on the site of the present church. Fr Lalor was appointed the first Parish Priest. Accommodation for Fr Lalor was not available, so in the beginning the church also doubled as the presbytery. Then, when “Grantuly” was purchased, he stayed there until the presbytery was opened on 3rd May, 1925. Unfortunately he was not in residence for very long, as he was killed in a car accident on Waterworks Road on 25th August, 1925.

I n the late Second-Temple Era, the custom of letting the land rest in each 7th year was an important tenet of Jewish law. Flavius Josephus, a priest-historian who lived in the first century CE, described the Jewish custom of observing the Sabbatical law in some detail. The writings of the rabbis and certain ancient contracts also make it clear that Jews living under the late Second Temple were careful to observe each of the Sabbatical years.

T he law concerning the keeping of a Sabbatical year was complied with at a national level. Throughout the territory of Judea, it would have been mandatory--as a tenet of the constitution--for farmers to observe each 7th year as a Sabbatical year. The requirement to celebrate Sabbatical years throughout Judea would have been in force until the Second Temple fell (in 70 CE).

S ome ancient sources tend to indicate that the late Second-Temple practice of observing 7th years sprang from an earlier practice of celebrating a 50-year cycle. It seems that after 7 sets of Sabbatical years had been celebrated, each 50th year (called the jubilee) was also celebrated. The more primal practice of celebrating 7 sets of 7 years and a jubilee year is described in biblical texts--as follows.

Jesus is our Jubilee | 1 Year, 1 Book, Many People


Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article