This site is in remembrance of a dear friend that was incarcerated at the age of 16. Serving three consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole led him to suicide at the age of 25. These are excerpts from his letters during the last four years of his life, the end of 2012 to the beginning of 2017.

“…the concept of spending the rest of my life finally hit me… It’s really hard for me because I’m so young. It’s not like a guy in his forties where he has 20-30 years. I’ll easily do 50-55 years before I die. I’ve only been in jail for 5 1/2 years and I’m already flaking out. Currently, I’m dealing with the aftermath of that realization.”

“…my sentence is very unfair for two main reasons. One, my age and two, my mental state during the crime. I was interviewed by a forensic psychiatrist, a forensic psychologist and a child psychologist and all three agreed that mental illness played a huge factor. However, it did not reach the requirements of legal insanity.”

This site is in remembrance of a dear friend that was incarcerated at the age of 16. Serving three consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole led him to suicide at the age of 25. These are excerpts from his letters during the last four years of his life, the end of 2012 to the beginning of 2017.

“…the concept of spending the rest of my life finally hit me… It’s really hard for me because I’m so young. It’s not like a guy in his forties where he has 20-30 years. I’ll easily do 50-55 years before I die. I’ve only been in jail for 5 1/2 years and I’m already flaking out. Currently, I’m dealing with the aftermath of that realization.”

“…my sentence is very unfair for two main reasons. One, my age and two, my mental state during the crime. I was interviewed by a forensic psychiatrist, a forensic psychologist and a child psychologist and all three agreed that mental illness played a huge factor. However, it did not reach the requirements of legal insanity.”

The devastating report on Liverpool prison describes a broken institution ( Liverpool prison has ‘worst conditions inspectors have seen’ , 19 January). The squalid conditions and institutionalised degradation of prisoners is shocking. It also reveals the unofficial punishments used by staff, inadequate scrutiny of the high use of force, the treatment of black and minority ethnic prisoners, the dismissive attitude towards prisoners, the non-investigation of unexplained injuries and the lack of first-night supervision, so crucial in preventing self-inflicted deaths.

Ultimately, however, the only way to halt the morally indefensible tide of prison deaths and safety concerns is to dramatically reduce the prison population, invest in community alternatives and transform the nature and culture of prisons so they become places of last resort, where rehabilitation is more than a rhetorical fantasy. This course of action will truly contribute to the safety and wellbeing of prisoners, caring staff and the wider public.

Deborah Coles Director, Inquest
Professor Joe Sim Liverpool John Moores University
Professor Steve Tombs The Open University

Dr. Mark Goulston has been getting letters from prisoners for over 30 years. They are scary, heart-wrenching, emotional,and oddly...relatable. Were it not for some crazy twist of fate, they could be any one of us, even you. Many crimes can be classified as "crimes of passion” — moments when after a buildup of some level of frustration or rage, something somehow just goes off the rails, and lands someone behind bars… Join this bestselling author, board certified psychiatrist, hostage negotiator, and former member of the OJ Simpson prosecution team as he reads the fascinating letters from inmates who are serving years to lifetimes for their crimes. Come inside...with Prison Letters.

Thinking through an effective sentencing strategy includes thoughts about the character reference letters. Every defendant has an opportunity to submit character reference letters that may make an impression on the judge. But what makes a good character reference letter for the court? Besides reading this article,

In the fall of 2016, I interviewed Judge Mark Bennett and he spoke specifically about  Character Reference Letters . Judge Bennett said that he has read somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 character reference letters. He based his estimate on the fact that he has sentenced more than 4,000 people. On average, Judge Bennett said that defendants submit between seven and nine character reference letters. Some defendants, however, go overboard. He spoke about one defendant who submitted 100 character reference letters.

Elsewhere, I wrote about the study on allocution that Judge Bennett orchestrated. In the findings published in the Alabama Law Journal that described  Judges’ Views on Allocution in Sentencing,  he spoke about what he learned from a survey he distributed to more than 900 federal judges. All of them, it would seem, consider character reference letters as a useful resource when deliberating over the appropriate sentence.

Artist Peter Gorman biked Chicago recently and thought the city's grid-like streetscape was striking -- so much so, he made art of the city's weirder intersections . Can you guess which intersection you're looking at from the lines and angles? Take this quiz to test your street knowledge.

This site is in remembrance of a dear friend that was incarcerated at the age of 16. Serving three consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole led him to suicide at the age of 25. These are excerpts from his letters during the last four years of his life, the end of 2012 to the beginning of 2017.

“…the concept of spending the rest of my life finally hit me… It’s really hard for me because I’m so young. It’s not like a guy in his forties where he has 20-30 years. I’ll easily do 50-55 years before I die. I’ve only been in jail for 5 1/2 years and I’m already flaking out. Currently, I’m dealing with the aftermath of that realization.”

“…my sentence is very unfair for two main reasons. One, my age and two, my mental state during the crime. I was interviewed by a forensic psychiatrist, a forensic psychologist and a child psychologist and all three agreed that mental illness played a huge factor. However, it did not reach the requirements of legal insanity.”

The devastating report on Liverpool prison describes a broken institution ( Liverpool prison has ‘worst conditions inspectors have seen’ , 19 January). The squalid conditions and institutionalised degradation of prisoners is shocking. It also reveals the unofficial punishments used by staff, inadequate scrutiny of the high use of force, the treatment of black and minority ethnic prisoners, the dismissive attitude towards prisoners, the non-investigation of unexplained injuries and the lack of first-night supervision, so crucial in preventing self-inflicted deaths.

Ultimately, however, the only way to halt the morally indefensible tide of prison deaths and safety concerns is to dramatically reduce the prison population, invest in community alternatives and transform the nature and culture of prisons so they become places of last resort, where rehabilitation is more than a rhetorical fantasy. This course of action will truly contribute to the safety and wellbeing of prisoners, caring staff and the wider public.

Deborah Coles Director, Inquest
Professor Joe Sim Liverpool John Moores University
Professor Steve Tombs The Open University

This site is in remembrance of a dear friend that was incarcerated at the age of 16. Serving three consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole led him to suicide at the age of 25. These are excerpts from his letters during the last four years of his life, the end of 2012 to the beginning of 2017.

“…the concept of spending the rest of my life finally hit me… It’s really hard for me because I’m so young. It’s not like a guy in his forties where he has 20-30 years. I’ll easily do 50-55 years before I die. I’ve only been in jail for 5 1/2 years and I’m already flaking out. Currently, I’m dealing with the aftermath of that realization.”

“…my sentence is very unfair for two main reasons. One, my age and two, my mental state during the crime. I was interviewed by a forensic psychiatrist, a forensic psychologist and a child psychologist and all three agreed that mental illness played a huge factor. However, it did not reach the requirements of legal insanity.”

The devastating report on Liverpool prison describes a broken institution ( Liverpool prison has ‘worst conditions inspectors have seen’ , 19 January). The squalid conditions and institutionalised degradation of prisoners is shocking. It also reveals the unofficial punishments used by staff, inadequate scrutiny of the high use of force, the treatment of black and minority ethnic prisoners, the dismissive attitude towards prisoners, the non-investigation of unexplained injuries and the lack of first-night supervision, so crucial in preventing self-inflicted deaths.

Ultimately, however, the only way to halt the morally indefensible tide of prison deaths and safety concerns is to dramatically reduce the prison population, invest in community alternatives and transform the nature and culture of prisons so they become places of last resort, where rehabilitation is more than a rhetorical fantasy. This course of action will truly contribute to the safety and wellbeing of prisoners, caring staff and the wider public.

Deborah Coles Director, Inquest
Professor Joe Sim Liverpool John Moores University
Professor Steve Tombs The Open University

Dr. Mark Goulston has been getting letters from prisoners for over 30 years. They are scary, heart-wrenching, emotional,and oddly...relatable. Were it not for some crazy twist of fate, they could be any one of us, even you. Many crimes can be classified as "crimes of passion” — moments when after a buildup of some level of frustration or rage, something somehow just goes off the rails, and lands someone behind bars… Join this bestselling author, board certified psychiatrist, hostage negotiator, and former member of the OJ Simpson prosecution team as he reads the fascinating letters from inmates who are serving years to lifetimes for their crimes. Come inside...with Prison Letters.

Thinking through an effective sentencing strategy includes thoughts about the character reference letters. Every defendant has an opportunity to submit character reference letters that may make an impression on the judge. But what makes a good character reference letter for the court? Besides reading this article,

In the fall of 2016, I interviewed Judge Mark Bennett and he spoke specifically about  Character Reference Letters . Judge Bennett said that he has read somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 character reference letters. He based his estimate on the fact that he has sentenced more than 4,000 people. On average, Judge Bennett said that defendants submit between seven and nine character reference letters. Some defendants, however, go overboard. He spoke about one defendant who submitted 100 character reference letters.

Elsewhere, I wrote about the study on allocution that Judge Bennett orchestrated. In the findings published in the Alabama Law Journal that described  Judges’ Views on Allocution in Sentencing,  he spoke about what he learned from a survey he distributed to more than 900 federal judges. All of them, it would seem, consider character reference letters as a useful resource when deliberating over the appropriate sentence.

This site is in remembrance of a dear friend that was incarcerated at the age of 16. Serving three consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole led him to suicide at the age of 25. These are excerpts from his letters during the last four years of his life, the end of 2012 to the beginning of 2017.

“…the concept of spending the rest of my life finally hit me… It’s really hard for me because I’m so young. It’s not like a guy in his forties where he has 20-30 years. I’ll easily do 50-55 years before I die. I’ve only been in jail for 5 1/2 years and I’m already flaking out. Currently, I’m dealing with the aftermath of that realization.”

“…my sentence is very unfair for two main reasons. One, my age and two, my mental state during the crime. I was interviewed by a forensic psychiatrist, a forensic psychologist and a child psychologist and all three agreed that mental illness played a huge factor. However, it did not reach the requirements of legal insanity.”

The devastating report on Liverpool prison describes a broken institution ( Liverpool prison has ‘worst conditions inspectors have seen’ , 19 January). The squalid conditions and institutionalised degradation of prisoners is shocking. It also reveals the unofficial punishments used by staff, inadequate scrutiny of the high use of force, the treatment of black and minority ethnic prisoners, the dismissive attitude towards prisoners, the non-investigation of unexplained injuries and the lack of first-night supervision, so crucial in preventing self-inflicted deaths.

Ultimately, however, the only way to halt the morally indefensible tide of prison deaths and safety concerns is to dramatically reduce the prison population, invest in community alternatives and transform the nature and culture of prisons so they become places of last resort, where rehabilitation is more than a rhetorical fantasy. This course of action will truly contribute to the safety and wellbeing of prisoners, caring staff and the wider public.

Deborah Coles Director, Inquest
Professor Joe Sim Liverpool John Moores University
Professor Steve Tombs The Open University

Dr. Mark Goulston has been getting letters from prisoners for over 30 years. They are scary, heart-wrenching, emotional,and oddly...relatable. Were it not for some crazy twist of fate, they could be any one of us, even you. Many crimes can be classified as "crimes of passion” — moments when after a buildup of some level of frustration or rage, something somehow just goes off the rails, and lands someone behind bars… Join this bestselling author, board certified psychiatrist, hostage negotiator, and former member of the OJ Simpson prosecution team as he reads the fascinating letters from inmates who are serving years to lifetimes for their crimes. Come inside...with Prison Letters.

Staying in touch with someone in prison - GOV.UK


Andrew Anglin | Letters from Internet Prison

Posted by 2018 article

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