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On August 14, 1834, nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana Jr. made his way to Boston Harbor in search of a two-masted brig called the Pilgrim . An archetypal Brahmin—dad was a poet and essayist, granddad had been chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, great-granddad was one of the original Sons of Liberty—Dana had been a promising student at Harvard College until measles inflamed his corneas and he could no longer read without pain. He resolved to effect a “cure, if possible, by an entire change of life.” Discarding the dress coat and silk cap of an undergraduate, he donned the duck trousers and tarpaulin hat of a sailor.

The remedy worked, but even more valuable were the experiences that Dana, who was born 200 years ago this August, turned into Two Years Before the Mast , one of America’s first literary classics. An astonishingly effective memoir of life as an ordinary seaman quartered “before the mast” in the squalid space below decks, the book, a sensation in its own time, is a model of reportage, rife with the nautical jargon of a specialist and an anthropologist’s descriptive mastery of life aboard ship and in the Pilgrim ’s then-exotic ports of call. It would influence generations of readers and writers and remains a mainstay on American reading lists.

In California, Dana mastered the art of carrying the wide, flat, heavy hides atop his head. From one steep bluff, which Dana called “the only romantic spot on the coast,” the sailors pitched the hides onto the beach like giant Frisbees; that spot, some 60 miles south of contemporary Los Angeles, is today a city called Dana Point. But it wasn’t all work: Dana went to cockfights, ate frijoles and watched performances of the fandango. A decade later, forty-niners rushing to California carried Two Years Before the Mast as a guidebook.

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On August 14, 1834, nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana Jr. made his way to Boston Harbor in search of a two-masted brig called the Pilgrim . An archetypal Brahmin—dad was a poet and essayist, granddad had been chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, great-granddad was one of the original Sons of Liberty—Dana had been a promising student at Harvard College until measles inflamed his corneas and he could no longer read without pain. He resolved to effect a “cure, if possible, by an entire change of life.” Discarding the dress coat and silk cap of an undergraduate, he donned the duck trousers and tarpaulin hat of a sailor.

The remedy worked, but even more valuable were the experiences that Dana, who was born 200 years ago this August, turned into Two Years Before the Mast , one of America’s first literary classics. An astonishingly effective memoir of life as an ordinary seaman quartered “before the mast” in the squalid space below decks, the book, a sensation in its own time, is a model of reportage, rife with the nautical jargon of a specialist and an anthropologist’s descriptive mastery of life aboard ship and in the Pilgrim ’s then-exotic ports of call. It would influence generations of readers and writers and remains a mainstay on American reading lists.

In California, Dana mastered the art of carrying the wide, flat, heavy hides atop his head. From one steep bluff, which Dana called “the only romantic spot on the coast,” the sailors pitched the hides onto the beach like giant Frisbees; that spot, some 60 miles south of contemporary Los Angeles, is today a city called Dana Point. But it wasn’t all work: Dana went to cockfights, ate frijoles and watched performances of the fandango. A decade later, forty-niners rushing to California carried Two Years Before the Mast as a guidebook.

Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana Jr. , published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage from Boston to California on a merchant ship starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

While an undergraduate at Harvard College , Dana had an attack of the measles which affected his vision. Thinking it might help his sight, Dana left Harvard to enlist as a common sailor on a voyage around Cape Horn on the brig Pilgrim . He returned to Massachusetts two years later, aboard the Alert (which left California sooner than the Pilgrim ).

He kept a diary throughout the voyage, and, after returning, he wrote a recognized American classic, Two Years Before the Mast , published in 1840.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

On August 14, 1834, nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana Jr. made his way to Boston Harbor in search of a two-masted brig called the Pilgrim . An archetypal Brahmin—dad was a poet and essayist, granddad had been chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, great-granddad was one of the original Sons of Liberty—Dana had been a promising student at Harvard College until measles inflamed his corneas and he could no longer read without pain. He resolved to effect a “cure, if possible, by an entire change of life.” Discarding the dress coat and silk cap of an undergraduate, he donned the duck trousers and tarpaulin hat of a sailor.

The remedy worked, but even more valuable were the experiences that Dana, who was born 200 years ago this August, turned into Two Years Before the Mast , one of America’s first literary classics. An astonishingly effective memoir of life as an ordinary seaman quartered “before the mast” in the squalid space below decks, the book, a sensation in its own time, is a model of reportage, rife with the nautical jargon of a specialist and an anthropologist’s descriptive mastery of life aboard ship and in the Pilgrim ’s then-exotic ports of call. It would influence generations of readers and writers and remains a mainstay on American reading lists.

In California, Dana mastered the art of carrying the wide, flat, heavy hides atop his head. From one steep bluff, which Dana called “the only romantic spot on the coast,” the sailors pitched the hides onto the beach like giant Frisbees; that spot, some 60 miles south of contemporary Los Angeles, is today a city called Dana Point. But it wasn’t all work: Dana went to cockfights, ate frijoles and watched performances of the fandango. A decade later, forty-niners rushing to California carried Two Years Before the Mast as a guidebook.

Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana Jr. , published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage from Boston to California on a merchant ship starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

While an undergraduate at Harvard College , Dana had an attack of the measles which affected his vision. Thinking it might help his sight, Dana left Harvard to enlist as a common sailor on a voyage around Cape Horn on the brig Pilgrim . He returned to Massachusetts two years later, aboard the Alert (which left California sooner than the Pilgrim ).

He kept a diary throughout the voyage, and, after returning, he wrote a recognized American classic, Two Years Before the Mast , published in 1840.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The ensemble drama was effective largely because of the superb acting, the salty dialogue and the strong direction that kept things authentic.

Two Years Before the Mast is a 1946 adventure film based on Richard Henry Dana Jr. 's travel book of the same name .

In 1834, Charles Stewart (Alan Ladd), the spoiled, dissolute son of a shipping magnate, is shanghaied aboard the Pilgrim , one of his father's own ships. He embarks upon a long, hellish sea voyage under the tyrannical rule of Captain Francis Thompson (Howard Da Silva), assisted by his first mate, Amazeen (William Bendix). One of his crewmates is Richard Henry Dana Jr. (Brian Donlevy), who will ultimately recount the entire voyage on paper as a book.

In 1936, Republic Studios announced plans to make a version of the film starring James Dunn and produced by Bert Clark. [5] [6] Actor Lew Ayres was mentioned as a possible director [7] and Lionel Barrymore , or, if he refused, Walter Connolly was going to star. [8] The movie was meant to be an attempt by Republic to move into bigger budgeted productions. [9] Negotiations with Barrymore, Connolly and Fredric March fell through and the studio tried to sign Herbert Wilcoxon . [10]

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On August 14, 1834, nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana Jr. made his way to Boston Harbor in search of a two-masted brig called the Pilgrim . An archetypal Brahmin—dad was a poet and essayist, granddad had been chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, great-granddad was one of the original Sons of Liberty—Dana had been a promising student at Harvard College until measles inflamed his corneas and he could no longer read without pain. He resolved to effect a “cure, if possible, by an entire change of life.” Discarding the dress coat and silk cap of an undergraduate, he donned the duck trousers and tarpaulin hat of a sailor.

The remedy worked, but even more valuable were the experiences that Dana, who was born 200 years ago this August, turned into Two Years Before the Mast , one of America’s first literary classics. An astonishingly effective memoir of life as an ordinary seaman quartered “before the mast” in the squalid space below decks, the book, a sensation in its own time, is a model of reportage, rife with the nautical jargon of a specialist and an anthropologist’s descriptive mastery of life aboard ship and in the Pilgrim ’s then-exotic ports of call. It would influence generations of readers and writers and remains a mainstay on American reading lists.

In California, Dana mastered the art of carrying the wide, flat, heavy hides atop his head. From one steep bluff, which Dana called “the only romantic spot on the coast,” the sailors pitched the hides onto the beach like giant Frisbees; that spot, some 60 miles south of contemporary Los Angeles, is today a city called Dana Point. But it wasn’t all work: Dana went to cockfights, ate frijoles and watched performances of the fandango. A decade later, forty-niners rushing to California carried Two Years Before the Mast as a guidebook.

Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana Jr. , published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage from Boston to California on a merchant ship starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

While an undergraduate at Harvard College , Dana had an attack of the measles which affected his vision. Thinking it might help his sight, Dana left Harvard to enlist as a common sailor on a voyage around Cape Horn on the brig Pilgrim . He returned to Massachusetts two years later, aboard the Alert (which left California sooner than the Pilgrim ).

He kept a diary throughout the voyage, and, after returning, he wrote a recognized American classic, Two Years Before the Mast , published in 1840.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The ensemble drama was effective largely because of the superb acting, the salty dialogue and the strong direction that kept things authentic.

Two Years Before the Mast is a 1946 adventure film based on Richard Henry Dana Jr. 's travel book of the same name .

In 1834, Charles Stewart (Alan Ladd), the spoiled, dissolute son of a shipping magnate, is shanghaied aboard the Pilgrim , one of his father's own ships. He embarks upon a long, hellish sea voyage under the tyrannical rule of Captain Francis Thompson (Howard Da Silva), assisted by his first mate, Amazeen (William Bendix). One of his crewmates is Richard Henry Dana Jr. (Brian Donlevy), who will ultimately recount the entire voyage on paper as a book.

In 1936, Republic Studios announced plans to make a version of the film starring James Dunn and produced by Bert Clark. [5] [6] Actor Lew Ayres was mentioned as a possible director [7] and Lionel Barrymore , or, if he refused, Walter Connolly was going to star. [8] The movie was meant to be an attempt by Republic to move into bigger budgeted productions. [9] Negotiations with Barrymore, Connolly and Fredric March fell through and the studio tried to sign Herbert Wilcoxon . [10]

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

On August 14, 1834, nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana Jr. made his way to Boston Harbor in search of a two-masted brig called the Pilgrim . An archetypal Brahmin—dad was a poet and essayist, granddad had been chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, great-granddad was one of the original Sons of Liberty—Dana had been a promising student at Harvard College until measles inflamed his corneas and he could no longer read without pain. He resolved to effect a “cure, if possible, by an entire change of life.” Discarding the dress coat and silk cap of an undergraduate, he donned the duck trousers and tarpaulin hat of a sailor.

The remedy worked, but even more valuable were the experiences that Dana, who was born 200 years ago this August, turned into Two Years Before the Mast , one of America’s first literary classics. An astonishingly effective memoir of life as an ordinary seaman quartered “before the mast” in the squalid space below decks, the book, a sensation in its own time, is a model of reportage, rife with the nautical jargon of a specialist and an anthropologist’s descriptive mastery of life aboard ship and in the Pilgrim ’s then-exotic ports of call. It would influence generations of readers and writers and remains a mainstay on American reading lists.

In California, Dana mastered the art of carrying the wide, flat, heavy hides atop his head. From one steep bluff, which Dana called “the only romantic spot on the coast,” the sailors pitched the hides onto the beach like giant Frisbees; that spot, some 60 miles south of contemporary Los Angeles, is today a city called Dana Point. But it wasn’t all work: Dana went to cockfights, ate frijoles and watched performances of the fandango. A decade later, forty-niners rushing to California carried Two Years Before the Mast as a guidebook.

Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana Jr. , published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage from Boston to California on a merchant ship starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

While an undergraduate at Harvard College , Dana had an attack of the measles which affected his vision. Thinking it might help his sight, Dana left Harvard to enlist as a common sailor on a voyage around Cape Horn on the brig Pilgrim . He returned to Massachusetts two years later, aboard the Alert (which left California sooner than the Pilgrim ).

He kept a diary throughout the voyage, and, after returning, he wrote a recognized American classic, Two Years Before the Mast , published in 1840.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The ensemble drama was effective largely because of the superb acting, the salty dialogue and the strong direction that kept things authentic.

Two Years Before the Mast (film) - Wikipedia


Two Years Before the Mast (1946) - IMDb

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