Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite ( / t ɑːr ˈ t ʊ f , - ˈ t uː f / ; [1] French : Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur , pronounced  [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ] ), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière . The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.

Molière wrote Tartuffe in 1664. Almost immediately following its first performance that same year at the Versailles fêtes , it was censored by King Louis XIV , probably due to the influence of the archbishop of Paris , Paul Philippe Hardouin de Beaumont de Péréfixe , who was the King's confessor and had been his tutor . [2] While the king had little personal interest in suppressing the play, he did so because, as stated in the official account of the fête:

"...although it was found to be extremely diverting, the king recognized so much conformity between those that a true devotion leads on the path to heaven and those that a vain ostentation of some good works does not prevent from committing some bad ones, that his extreme delicacy to religious matters can not suffer this resemblance of vice to virtue, which could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so he forbids it in public, and deprived himself of this pleasure, in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it." [3]

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Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite ( / t ɑːr ˈ t ʊ f , - ˈ t uː f / ; [1] French : Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur , pronounced  [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ] ), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière . The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.

Molière wrote Tartuffe in 1664. Almost immediately following its first performance that same year at the Versailles fêtes , it was censored by King Louis XIV , probably due to the influence of the archbishop of Paris , Paul Philippe Hardouin de Beaumont de Péréfixe , who was the King's confessor and had been his tutor . [2] While the king had little personal interest in suppressing the play, he did so because, as stated in the official account of the fête:

"...although it was found to be extremely diverting, the king recognized so much conformity between those that a true devotion leads on the path to heaven and those that a vain ostentation of some good works does not prevent from committing some bad ones, that his extreme delicacy to religious matters can not suffer this resemblance of vice to virtue, which could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so he forbids it in public, and deprived himself of this pleasure, in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it." [3]

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Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite ( / t ɑːr ˈ t ʊ f , - ˈ t uː f / ; [1] French : Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur , pronounced  [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ] ), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière . The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.

Molière wrote Tartuffe in 1664. Almost immediately following its first performance that same year at the Versailles fêtes , it was censored by King Louis XIV , probably due to the influence of the archbishop of Paris , Paul Philippe Hardouin de Beaumont de Péréfixe , who was the King's confessor and had been his tutor . [2] While the king had little personal interest in suppressing the play, he did so because, as stated in the official account of the fête:

"...although it was found to be extremely diverting, the king recognized so much conformity between those that a true devotion leads on the path to heaven and those that a vain ostentation of some good works does not prevent from committing some bad ones, that his extreme delicacy to religious matters can not suffer this resemblance of vice to virtue, which could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so he forbids it in public, and deprived himself of this pleasure, in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it." [3]

Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite ( / t ɑːr ˈ t ʊ f , - ˈ t uː f / ; [1] French : Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur , pronounced  [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ] ), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière . The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.

Molière wrote Tartuffe in 1664. Almost immediately following its first performance that same year at the Versailles fêtes , it was censored by King Louis XIV , probably due to the influence of the archbishop of Paris , Paul Philippe Hardouin de Beaumont de Péréfixe , who was the King's confessor and had been his tutor . [2] While the king had little personal interest in suppressing the play, he did so because, as stated in the official account of the fête:

"...although it was found to be extremely diverting, the king recognized so much conformity between those that a true devotion leads on the path to heaven and those that a vain ostentation of some good works does not prevent from committing some bad ones, that his extreme delicacy to religious matters can not suffer this resemblance of vice to virtue, which could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so he forbids it in public, and deprived himself of this pleasure, in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it." [3]

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Uploaded by WhitneyYoung on June 26, 2013

Anytime Within the last year Within the past 3 years Custom Period

It’s your single place to instantly
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that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
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Molière , original name Jean-Baptiste Poquelin , (baptized January 15, 1622, Paris, France—died February 17, 1673, Paris), French actor and playwright, the greatest of all writers of French comedy .

From the time of his return to Paris in 1658, all the reliable facts about Molière’s life have to do with his activity as author, actor, and manager. Some French biographers have done their best to read his personal life into his works, but at the cost of misconstruing what might have happened as what did happen. The truth is that there is little information except legend and satire .

Although unquestionably a great writer, Molière insisted that his plays were made for the stage, and his early prefaces complain that he had to publish to avoid exploitation. (Two of the plays were in fact pirated.) Comedies, in his view, were made to be acted. This fact was forgotten in the 19th century. It took such modern actors as Louis Jouvet , Jean-Louis Barrault , Francis Huster, Michel Bouquet, and Denis Podalydès to present a new and exact sense of his dramatic genius.

Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite ( / t ɑːr ˈ t ʊ f , - ˈ t uː f / ; [1] French : Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur , pronounced  [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ] ), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière . The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.

Molière wrote Tartuffe in 1664. Almost immediately following its first performance that same year at the Versailles fêtes , it was censored by King Louis XIV , probably due to the influence of the archbishop of Paris , Paul Philippe Hardouin de Beaumont de Péréfixe , who was the King's confessor and had been his tutor . [2] While the king had little personal interest in suppressing the play, he did so because, as stated in the official account of the fête:

"...although it was found to be extremely diverting, the king recognized so much conformity between those that a true devotion leads on the path to heaven and those that a vain ostentation of some good works does not prevent from committing some bad ones, that his extreme delicacy to religious matters can not suffer this resemblance of vice to virtue, which could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so he forbids it in public, and deprived himself of this pleasure, in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it." [3]

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Le misanthrope; comédie, 1666. Texte revu sur l éd. de.


LE MISANTHROPE - Extrait - La Comédie-Française au cinéma.

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