Sony Pictures TV is bringing together one of the biggest movie stars, Scarlett Johansson ( The Avengers, Lucy, Her ), and the work of one of the most celebrated American novelists, the Pulitzer Prize winner Edith Wharton ( The Age Of Innocence ) for a limited series project that is about to hit the marketplace. Johansson is set to star in and executive produce the eight-episode period series, from Charles Finch’s Pink Sands, which is based on Wharton’s 1913 novel The Custom Of The Country.

Eyed for a cable run, possibly on premium cable, it will be written by British playwright-screenwriter Christopher Hampton ( Dangerous Liaisons, Atonement) from his original screenplay. Hampton originally wrote a feature script adaptation of  Custom Of The Country almost two decades ago, reportedly for Michelle Pfeiffer who had starred in the 1993 feature  Age Of Innocence, based on Wharton’s book. It was published in 2002 as part of a collection of Hampton screenplays.

Custom Of The Country is described as a scathing story of ambition featuring one of the most ruthless heroines in literature, Undine Spragg, who will be played by Johansson in her first major TV role. Undine is as unscrupulous as she is magnetically beautiful. Her rise to the top of New York’s high society from her nouveau riche roots provides a provocative and thoroughly modern commentary on the upwardly mobile and the aspirations that eventually cause their ruin.

Sony Pictures TV is bringing together one of the biggest movie stars, Scarlett Johansson ( The Avengers, Lucy, Her ), and the work of one of the most celebrated American novelists, the Pulitzer Prize winner Edith Wharton ( The Age Of Innocence ) for a limited series project that is about to hit the marketplace. Johansson is set to star in and executive produce the eight-episode period series, from Charles Finch’s Pink Sands, which is based on Wharton’s 1913 novel The Custom Of The Country.

Eyed for a cable run, possibly on premium cable, it will be written by British playwright-screenwriter Christopher Hampton ( Dangerous Liaisons, Atonement) from his original screenplay. Hampton originally wrote a feature script adaptation of  Custom Of The Country almost two decades ago, reportedly for Michelle Pfeiffer who had starred in the 1993 feature  Age Of Innocence, based on Wharton’s book. It was published in 2002 as part of a collection of Hampton screenplays.

Custom Of The Country is described as a scathing story of ambition featuring one of the most ruthless heroines in literature, Undine Spragg, who will be played by Johansson in her first major TV role. Undine is as unscrupulous as she is magnetically beautiful. Her rise to the top of New York’s high society from her nouveau riche roots provides a provocative and thoroughly modern commentary on the upwardly mobile and the aspirations that eventually cause their ruin.

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton . It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

The Spraggs, a family of midwesterners from the fictional city of Apex who have made money through somewhat shady financial dealings, arrive in New York City at the prompting of their beautiful, ambitious, but socially-naive daughter, Undine. She marries Ralph Marvell, a member of an old New York family that no longer enjoys significant wealth. Before her wedding, Undine encounters an acquaintance from Apex named Elmer Moffatt, a character with "a genuine disdain for religious piety and social cant", as the scholar Elaine Showalter observes. Undine begs him not to do anything that will endanger her wedding to Ralph. Elmer agrees.

Gerard Sweeney has claimed a connection between the "Pure Water Move" and Wharton's cousin Joseph Wharton 's interest in Philadelphia water supplies [2] but Hollis Robbins suggests that Wharton knew her cousin's plan was tragically inadequate and would not have prevented typhoid deaths, arguing that "Edith Wharton's practical grasp of late-nineteenth-century municipal water problems suggests how to account for the novel's reward of circulation" as public health measure. [3] Bill Gleason reads anxieties about masculinity in "The Phantom Toothpick: Men's Mouths in The Custom of the Country." [4] Maria DiBattista calls Undine "The Serial Bride." [5]

Sony Pictures TV is bringing together one of the biggest movie stars, Scarlett Johansson ( The Avengers, Lucy, Her ), and the work of one of the most celebrated American novelists, the Pulitzer Prize winner Edith Wharton ( The Age Of Innocence ) for a limited series project that is about to hit the marketplace. Johansson is set to star in and executive produce the eight-episode period series, from Charles Finch’s Pink Sands, which is based on Wharton’s 1913 novel The Custom Of The Country.

Eyed for a cable run, possibly on premium cable, it will be written by British playwright-screenwriter Christopher Hampton ( Dangerous Liaisons, Atonement) from his original screenplay. Hampton originally wrote a feature script adaptation of  Custom Of The Country almost two decades ago, reportedly for Michelle Pfeiffer who had starred in the 1993 feature  Age Of Innocence, based on Wharton’s book. It was published in 2002 as part of a collection of Hampton screenplays.

Custom Of The Country is described as a scathing story of ambition featuring one of the most ruthless heroines in literature, Undine Spragg, who will be played by Johansson in her first major TV role. Undine is as unscrupulous as she is magnetically beautiful. Her rise to the top of New York’s high society from her nouveau riche roots provides a provocative and thoroughly modern commentary on the upwardly mobile and the aspirations that eventually cause their ruin.

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton . It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

The Spraggs, a family of midwesterners from the fictional city of Apex who have made money through somewhat shady financial dealings, arrive in New York City at the prompting of their beautiful, ambitious, but socially-naive daughter, Undine. She marries Ralph Marvell, a member of an old New York family that no longer enjoys significant wealth. Before her wedding, Undine encounters an acquaintance from Apex named Elmer Moffatt, a character with "a genuine disdain for religious piety and social cant", as the scholar Elaine Showalter observes. Undine begs him not to do anything that will endanger her wedding to Ralph. Elmer agrees.

Gerard Sweeney has claimed a connection between the "Pure Water Move" and Wharton's cousin Joseph Wharton 's interest in Philadelphia water supplies [2] but Hollis Robbins suggests that Wharton knew her cousin's plan was tragically inadequate and would not have prevented typhoid deaths, arguing that "Edith Wharton's practical grasp of late-nineteenth-century municipal water problems suggests how to account for the novel's reward of circulation" as public health measure. [3] Bill Gleason reads anxieties about masculinity in "The Phantom Toothpick: Men's Mouths in The Custom of the Country." [4] Maria DiBattista calls Undine "The Serial Bride." [5]

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton. It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

The Custom of the Country is a Jacobean stage play, a tragicomedy written by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, originally published in 1647 in the first Beaumont ...

With Scarlett Johansson. Undine Spragg, a cunning and attractive woman living in New York during the early part of the Twentieth Century, rises to the top of the city ...

Sony Pictures TV is bringing together one of the biggest movie stars, Scarlett Johansson ( The Avengers, Lucy, Her ), and the work of one of the most celebrated American novelists, the Pulitzer Prize winner Edith Wharton ( The Age Of Innocence ) for a limited series project that is about to hit the marketplace. Johansson is set to star in and executive produce the eight-episode period series, from Charles Finch’s Pink Sands, which is based on Wharton’s 1913 novel The Custom Of The Country.

Eyed for a cable run, possibly on premium cable, it will be written by British playwright-screenwriter Christopher Hampton ( Dangerous Liaisons, Atonement) from his original screenplay. Hampton originally wrote a feature script adaptation of  Custom Of The Country almost two decades ago, reportedly for Michelle Pfeiffer who had starred in the 1993 feature  Age Of Innocence, based on Wharton’s book. It was published in 2002 as part of a collection of Hampton screenplays.

Custom Of The Country is described as a scathing story of ambition featuring one of the most ruthless heroines in literature, Undine Spragg, who will be played by Johansson in her first major TV role. Undine is as unscrupulous as she is magnetically beautiful. Her rise to the top of New York’s high society from her nouveau riche roots provides a provocative and thoroughly modern commentary on the upwardly mobile and the aspirations that eventually cause their ruin.

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton . It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

The Spraggs, a family of midwesterners from the fictional city of Apex who have made money through somewhat shady financial dealings, arrive in New York City at the prompting of their beautiful, ambitious, but socially-naive daughter, Undine. She marries Ralph Marvell, a member of an old New York family that no longer enjoys significant wealth. Before her wedding, Undine encounters an acquaintance from Apex named Elmer Moffatt, a character with "a genuine disdain for religious piety and social cant", as the scholar Elaine Showalter observes. Undine begs him not to do anything that will endanger her wedding to Ralph. Elmer agrees.

Gerard Sweeney has claimed a connection between the "Pure Water Move" and Wharton's cousin Joseph Wharton 's interest in Philadelphia water supplies [2] but Hollis Robbins suggests that Wharton knew her cousin's plan was tragically inadequate and would not have prevented typhoid deaths, arguing that "Edith Wharton's practical grasp of late-nineteenth-century municipal water problems suggests how to account for the novel's reward of circulation" as public health measure. [3] Bill Gleason reads anxieties about masculinity in "The Phantom Toothpick: Men's Mouths in The Custom of the Country." [4] Maria DiBattista calls Undine "The Serial Bride." [5]

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton. It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

The Custom of the Country is a Jacobean stage play, a tragicomedy written by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, originally published in 1647 in the first Beaumont ...

With Scarlett Johansson. Undine Spragg, a cunning and attractive woman living in New York during the early part of the Twentieth Century, rises to the top of the city ...

Highly acclaimed at its publication in 1913, The Custom of the Country is a cutting commentary on America’s nouveaux riches, their upward-yearning aspirations and their eventual downfalls. Through her heroine, the beautiful and ruthless Undine Spragg, a spoiled heiress who looks to her next materialistic triumph as her latest conquest throws himself at her feet, Edith Wharton presents a startling, satiric vision of social behavior in all its greedy glory. As Undine moves from America’s heartland to Manhattan, and then to Paris, Wharton’s critical eye leaves no social class unscathed.

The Custom of the Country (TV Movie) - IMDb


The Custom of the Country (play) - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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