9 February 1914: At 9.35 a.m., Second Lieutenant Henry Burnet Post, 25th Infantry regiment, United States Army, was “Killed in hydroplane No. 10 accident at Signal Corps Aviation School, San Diego, Calif., at 9.35 a.m. Feb. 9, 1914. (in line of duty)”

Lieutenant Post had just returned from 15 days’ compassionate leave (22 January–5 February 1914). His father, Henry Albertson Van Zo Post, had died at the family home in Manhattan, New York City, 25 January 1914.

Lieutenant Post left the North Island hangars at 8:50 o’clock this morning after having declared his intention of breaking the American altitude record for hydro-aeroplanes. Within an hour he had attained a height of 12,120 feet, the barograph showing this figure when recovered from the wreckage.

The museum is responsible for recommendations concerning the preservation, protection, development, and enhancement of historical buildings, monuments, works, and sites throughout the Fort Gordon Military Reservation. The museum serves as a medium of stimulating esprit de corps and of advancing knowledge of the Signal Corps, Fort Gordon and the United States Army.

Hours of Operation:
Tuesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 4 PM

9 February 1914: At 9.35 a.m., Second Lieutenant Henry Burnet Post, 25th Infantry regiment, United States Army, was “Killed in hydroplane No. 10 accident at Signal Corps Aviation School, San Diego, Calif., at 9.35 a.m. Feb. 9, 1914. (in line of duty)”

Lieutenant Post had just returned from 15 days’ compassionate leave (22 January–5 February 1914). His father, Henry Albertson Van Zo Post, had died at the family home in Manhattan, New York City, 25 January 1914.

Lieutenant Post left the North Island hangars at 8:50 o’clock this morning after having declared his intention of breaking the American altitude record for hydro-aeroplanes. Within an hour he had attained a height of 12,120 feet, the barograph showing this figure when recovered from the wreckage.

9 February 1914: At 9.35 a.m., Second Lieutenant Henry Burnet Post, 25th Infantry regiment, United States Army, was “Killed in hydroplane No. 10 accident at Signal Corps Aviation School, San Diego, Calif., at 9.35 a.m. Feb. 9, 1914. (in line of duty)”

Lieutenant Post had just returned from 15 days’ compassionate leave (22 January–5 February 1914). His father, Henry Albertson Van Zo Post, had died at the family home in Manhattan, New York City, 25 January 1914.

Lieutenant Post left the North Island hangars at 8:50 o’clock this morning after having declared his intention of breaking the American altitude record for hydro-aeroplanes. Within an hour he had attained a height of 12,120 feet, the barograph showing this figure when recovered from the wreckage.

The museum is responsible for recommendations concerning the preservation, protection, development, and enhancement of historical buildings, monuments, works, and sites throughout the Fort Gordon Military Reservation. The museum serves as a medium of stimulating esprit de corps and of advancing knowledge of the Signal Corps, Fort Gordon and the United States Army.

Hours of Operation:
Tuesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 4 PM

On this day in 1942, the Quartermaster Corps (QMC) of the United States Army begins training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or “K-9 Corps.”

Well over a million dogs served on both sides during World War I, carrying messages along the complex network of trenches and providing some measure of psychological comfort to the soldiers. The most famous dog to emerge from the war was Rin Tin Tin, an abandoned puppy of German war dogs found in France in 1918 and taken to the United States, where he made his film debut in the 1922 silent film The Man from Hell’s River. As the first bona fide animal movie star, Rin Tin Tin made the little-known German Shepherd breed famous across the country.

In the United States, the practice of training dogs for military purposes was largely abandoned after World War I. When the country entered World War II in December 1941, the American Kennel Association and a group called Dogs for Defense began a movement to mobilize dog owners to donate healthy and capable animals to the Quartermaster Corps of the U.S. Army. Training began in March 1942, and that fall the QMC was given the task of training dogs for the U.S. Navy, Marines and Coast Guard as well.

9 February 1914: At 9.35 a.m., Second Lieutenant Henry Burnet Post, 25th Infantry regiment, United States Army, was “Killed in hydroplane No. 10 accident at Signal Corps Aviation School, San Diego, Calif., at 9.35 a.m. Feb. 9, 1914. (in line of duty)”

Lieutenant Post had just returned from 15 days’ compassionate leave (22 January–5 February 1914). His father, Henry Albertson Van Zo Post, had died at the family home in Manhattan, New York City, 25 January 1914.

Lieutenant Post left the North Island hangars at 8:50 o’clock this morning after having declared his intention of breaking the American altitude record for hydro-aeroplanes. Within an hour he had attained a height of 12,120 feet, the barograph showing this figure when recovered from the wreckage.

The museum is responsible for recommendations concerning the preservation, protection, development, and enhancement of historical buildings, monuments, works, and sites throughout the Fort Gordon Military Reservation. The museum serves as a medium of stimulating esprit de corps and of advancing knowledge of the Signal Corps, Fort Gordon and the United States Army.

Hours of Operation:
Tuesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 4 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 4 PM

On this day in 1942, the Quartermaster Corps (QMC) of the United States Army begins training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or “K-9 Corps.”

Well over a million dogs served on both sides during World War I, carrying messages along the complex network of trenches and providing some measure of psychological comfort to the soldiers. The most famous dog to emerge from the war was Rin Tin Tin, an abandoned puppy of German war dogs found in France in 1918 and taken to the United States, where he made his film debut in the 1922 silent film The Man from Hell’s River. As the first bona fide animal movie star, Rin Tin Tin made the little-known German Shepherd breed famous across the country.

In the United States, the practice of training dogs for military purposes was largely abandoned after World War I. When the country entered World War II in December 1941, the American Kennel Association and a group called Dogs for Defense began a movement to mobilize dog owners to donate healthy and capable animals to the Quartermaster Corps of the U.S. Army. Training began in March 1942, and that fall the QMC was given the task of training dogs for the U.S. Navy, Marines and Coast Guard as well.

According to an agency report based on research conducted last year, unusually heavy rains could trigger a premature opening of the dam's massive spillway.

"Under certain conditions, the spillway on the San Gabriel River can release more than 20 times what the downstream channel can safely contain within its levees," the report said. "Depending on the size of the discharge, flooding could extend from Pico Rivera, immediately downstream of the dam, to Long Beach."

In addition, engineers have found that the milelong earthen structure could fail if water were to flow over its crest or if seepage eroded the sandy soil underneath.

U.S. Army Mage Corps: SWORD Kindle Edition - amazon.ca


U.S. Army Mage Corps: SWORD by John Holmes

Posted by 2018 article

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