Interestingly, Harper Lee decided to set the novel in the Depression era of the 1930s. The main character, Scout, is based on Lee's own childhood, and Dill is most likely based on her childhood friend and neighbor, Truman Capote. By placing her novel in the 1930s, Lee provided her readers with a historical background for current events of the time, and in doing so she exposed the deeply rooted history of the civil rights struggle in the South.

The novel's characters are forced to examine the world (or at least the town) in which they live. Through observing their society and interacting with people such as Tom Robinson and Boo Radley , they come to understand more about true bravery, cowardice, and humanity.

The Radley house is shrouded in mystery. Boo Radley and the goings on of his family have become the stuff of ghost stories. Naturally, being children, Scout and Jem hold the house with both fascination and fear. Is Boo really a monster who dines...

T o Kill a Mockingbird is one of those books that almost everyone reads at some point in their lives. Whether you've been forced to read it at school, or you've had a look because everyone's been urging you to, most people have their own personal experience of reading Mockingbird.

The book is about Atticus Finch, who appears as an unconventional hero and role model due to his morality rather than his physical capabilities. The theme of morals is apparent throughout the whole novel, especially in relation to religion and perception of sin. Take Mrs Dubose, a recovering morphine addict: she vows that she'll die beholden to nothing and nobody. She's pursuing her own dream of being a free human being because she knows deep down that it's right.

In the 1930s, when the book was set, America was in the midst of the Great Depression. This was a time when economic difficulties meant that the American Dream was receding further and further away. We could consider that Atticus Finch felt that his own dream of an equal, morally decent society was also heading in the wrong direction.

Scout - Jemima Bennett, Rosie Boore, Ava Potter
Jem - Harry Bennett, Billy Price, Arthur Franks
Dill - Leo Heller, Milo Panni, Connor Brundish

Atticus Finch - Robert Sean Leonard
Boo Radley - Christopher Akrill
Reverend Sykes - Geoff Aymer
Mayella Ewell - Victoria Bewick
Nathan Radley/Mr Gilmer - David Carlyle
Maudie Atkinson - Natalie Grady
Heck Tate - Jamie Kenna
Link Deas/Musician - Luke Potter
Calpurnia - Susan Lawson-Reynolds
Tom Robinson - Zackary Momoh
Bob Ewell - Ryan Pope
Walter Cunningham/Judge Taylor - Christopher Saul
Stephanie Crawford/Mrs Dubose - Connie Walker

Understudies:
Eke Chukwu Reverend Sykes and Tom Robinson
Kate England Maudie Atkinson, Mayella Ewell and Mrs Crawford/Mrs Dubose
Natasha Magigi Calpurnia
Matt Brewer Bob Ewell, Boo Radley, Nathan Radley/Mr Gilmer, Heck Tate, Walter Cunningham/Judge Taylor

Interestingly, Harper Lee decided to set the novel in the Depression era of the 1930s. The main character, Scout, is based on Lee's own childhood, and Dill is most likely based on her childhood friend and neighbor, Truman Capote. By placing her novel in the 1930s, Lee provided her readers with a historical background for current events of the time, and in doing so she exposed the deeply rooted history of the civil rights struggle in the South.

The novel's characters are forced to examine the world (or at least the town) in which they live. Through observing their society and interacting with people such as Tom Robinson and Boo Radley , they come to understand more about true bravery, cowardice, and humanity.

The Radley house is shrouded in mystery. Boo Radley and the goings on of his family have become the stuff of ghost stories. Naturally, being children, Scout and Jem hold the house with both fascination and fear. Is Boo really a monster who dines...

Interestingly, Harper Lee decided to set the novel in the Depression era of the 1930s. The main character, Scout, is based on Lee's own childhood, and Dill is most likely based on her childhood friend and neighbor, Truman Capote. By placing her novel in the 1930s, Lee provided her readers with a historical background for current events of the time, and in doing so she exposed the deeply rooted history of the civil rights struggle in the South.

The novel's characters are forced to examine the world (or at least the town) in which they live. Through observing their society and interacting with people such as Tom Robinson and Boo Radley , they come to understand more about true bravery, cowardice, and humanity.

The Radley house is shrouded in mystery. Boo Radley and the goings on of his family have become the stuff of ghost stories. Naturally, being children, Scout and Jem hold the house with both fascination and fear. Is Boo really a monster who dines...

T o Kill a Mockingbird is one of those books that almost everyone reads at some point in their lives. Whether you've been forced to read it at school, or you've had a look because everyone's been urging you to, most people have their own personal experience of reading Mockingbird.

The book is about Atticus Finch, who appears as an unconventional hero and role model due to his morality rather than his physical capabilities. The theme of morals is apparent throughout the whole novel, especially in relation to religion and perception of sin. Take Mrs Dubose, a recovering morphine addict: she vows that she'll die beholden to nothing and nobody. She's pursuing her own dream of being a free human being because she knows deep down that it's right.

In the 1930s, when the book was set, America was in the midst of the Great Depression. This was a time when economic difficulties meant that the American Dream was receding further and further away. We could consider that Atticus Finch felt that his own dream of an equal, morally decent society was also heading in the wrong direction.

SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird


To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) - IMDb

Posted by 2018 article

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