I’m not feeling so hot. Actually, I am feeling a little hot. And cold. Achy. Maybe I have mono? I duck into a MinuteClinic tucked in a back corner of a CVS near my home. There’s no line. I’m greeted by a nurse practitioner who takes a detailed health history and gives me a quick exam. For my $20 insurance copay, he rules out allergies and major infections, diagnosing me with a nasty cold. Eighteen minutes later, I get a pat on the back, a reminder to rest, a record of my diagnosis, and a finger-point to the cold-medicine stash. “They keep the good stuff behind the counter,” he advises.

Retail medical clinics, where a nurse practitioner handles routine issues such as colds, pinkeye, and bug bites, have gone from an experiment to a phenomenon in just a few years. There are now about 350 for-profit clinics run by some 40 different companies; the number of outlets could more than triple by the end of 2007. “We’re seeing a tipping point,” says Steve Wunker, an analyst for the health-care consulting firm Innosight. The industry has been boasting about its happy customers: It claims a 98% satisfaction rate.

Many doctors are decidedly less enthusiastic. The American Medical Association and many of its members have consistently bristled as the clinics have invaded their turf. The AMA even issued “nine principles” for acceptable clinic care last year. “There were all sorts of ways that the clinics appeared not to be adhering to the same standards for doctors in their offices,” says Dr. Peter Carmel, an AMA board member. “We don’t want to lose sight of patient quality in our haste to pay a cheaper price.”

I’m not feeling so hot. Actually, I am feeling a little hot. And cold. Achy. Maybe I have mono? I duck into a MinuteClinic tucked in a back corner of a CVS near my home. There’s no line. I’m greeted by a nurse practitioner who takes a detailed health history and gives me a quick exam. For my $20 insurance copay, he rules out allergies and major infections, diagnosing me with a nasty cold. Eighteen minutes later, I get a pat on the back, a reminder to rest, a record of my diagnosis, and a finger-point to the cold-medicine stash. “They keep the good stuff behind the counter,” he advises.

Retail medical clinics, where a nurse practitioner handles routine issues such as colds, pinkeye, and bug bites, have gone from an experiment to a phenomenon in just a few years. There are now about 350 for-profit clinics run by some 40 different companies; the number of outlets could more than triple by the end of 2007. “We’re seeing a tipping point,” says Steve Wunker, an analyst for the health-care consulting firm Innosight. The industry has been boasting about its happy customers: It claims a 98% satisfaction rate.

Many doctors are decidedly less enthusiastic. The American Medical Association and many of its members have consistently bristled as the clinics have invaded their turf. The AMA even issued “nine principles” for acceptable clinic care last year. “There were all sorts of ways that the clinics appeared not to be adhering to the same standards for doctors in their offices,” says Dr. Peter Carmel, an AMA board member. “We don’t want to lose sight of patient quality in our haste to pay a cheaper price.”

Исчезнувшая (2014)
# 179 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Cate Blanchett »
# 35 on STARmeter

The story of the Newton gang, the most successful bank robbers in history, owing to their good planning and minimal violence.

Watch Fast Food Burger Taste Test With Subtitles Online.


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Posted by 2018 article

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