The Chief Acquisition Officers Council (the Council) is established pursuant to Section 16 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, as amended, 41 USC 403, et seq.

The Council consists of a diverse group of acquisition professionals in the Executive Branch established to provide a senior level forum for monitoring and improving the federal acquisition system. The Council promotes effective business practices that ensure the timely delivery of best value products and services to the agencies, achieve public policy objectives, and further integrity, fairness, competition, and openness in the federal acquisition system. The Council works closely with the Administrator, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, and the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council to promote these business practices in the acquisition system.

Public Law 93-400, “The Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act”, as amended, created the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) in 1974, and placed it in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFPP was created, among other purposes, to provide Government-wide procurement policies “…which shall be followed by Executive agencies…” in the procurement activities.

The case of Iraq War opponent Lt. Ehren Watada reveals the toll the war has taken on career military personnel. Though his refusal to serve in Iraq is unusual, his disenchantment with the war is not.

For a junior Army officer named Ehren Watada, the road to Damascus was a two-lane street called Firing Center Road, which cuts through cow pastures in Yakima County, Washington. The air is bone dry, heavy with the smell of sagebrush, and the climate is similar to parts of Iraq. In the fall of 2005, Watada spent 30 days here, training on the Army's 306-acre stretch of desert. In his free time, he sat in the back of a Stryker vehicle and paged through books borrowed from the library in Fort Lewis, Washington.

Approximately eight months later, at 2:30 A.M. on June 22, 2006, the soldiers in Watada's unit, the Third Stryker Brigade of the Second Infantry Division, stepped onto an airplane bound for Kuwait International Airport and, shortly thereafter, Mosul, Iraq.

The Chief Acquisition Officers Council (the Council) is established pursuant to Section 16 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, as amended, 41 USC 403, et seq.

The Council consists of a diverse group of acquisition professionals in the Executive Branch established to provide a senior level forum for monitoring and improving the federal acquisition system. The Council promotes effective business practices that ensure the timely delivery of best value products and services to the agencies, achieve public policy objectives, and further integrity, fairness, competition, and openness in the federal acquisition system. The Council works closely with the Administrator, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, and the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council to promote these business practices in the acquisition system.

Public Law 93-400, “The Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act”, as amended, created the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) in 1974, and placed it in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFPP was created, among other purposes, to provide Government-wide procurement policies “…which shall be followed by Executive agencies…” in the procurement activities.

The case of Iraq War opponent Lt. Ehren Watada reveals the toll the war has taken on career military personnel. Though his refusal to serve in Iraq is unusual, his disenchantment with the war is not.

For a junior Army officer named Ehren Watada, the road to Damascus was a two-lane street called Firing Center Road, which cuts through cow pastures in Yakima County, Washington. The air is bone dry, heavy with the smell of sagebrush, and the climate is similar to parts of Iraq. In the fall of 2005, Watada spent 30 days here, training on the Army's 306-acre stretch of desert. In his free time, he sat in the back of a Stryker vehicle and paged through books borrowed from the library in Fort Lewis, Washington.

Approximately eight months later, at 2:30 A.M. on June 22, 2006, the soldiers in Watada's unit, the Third Stryker Brigade of the Second Infantry Division, stepped onto an airplane bound for Kuwait International Airport and, shortly thereafter, Mosul, Iraq.

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Officers puts you in command of the Allied force in the largest conflict of our time. Take control of the US and British armies in order to strike back and defeat the Axis menace on the Western front of Europe. With over 1500 units on maps up to 10 square miles, Officers is the first WWII real time strategy game to let you fight on a truly massive scale. Historical battles like Operation Overlord, Millennium, and Cobra will put your tactical skills to the test using combined forces from infantry and engineers to tanks, artillery and bombers.

Blazing speed and blunt force will only secure victory if you extend your supply lines and capture enemy weaponry and warehouses. Take the high ground and use terrain to your advantage with fully realistic physics and ballistics – only sound tactical maneuver will keep your men alive!

The Chief Acquisition Officers Council (the Council) is established pursuant to Section 16 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, as amended, 41 USC 403, et seq.

The Council consists of a diverse group of acquisition professionals in the Executive Branch established to provide a senior level forum for monitoring and improving the federal acquisition system. The Council promotes effective business practices that ensure the timely delivery of best value products and services to the agencies, achieve public policy objectives, and further integrity, fairness, competition, and openness in the federal acquisition system. The Council works closely with the Administrator, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, and the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council to promote these business practices in the acquisition system.

Public Law 93-400, “The Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act”, as amended, created the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) in 1974, and placed it in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFPP was created, among other purposes, to provide Government-wide procurement policies “…which shall be followed by Executive agencies…” in the procurement activities.

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