In the second part of the interview series with Eckhart Tolle entitled, Changing the World from Within , Suza Scalora speaks with Tolle about how our negative thought patterns often dominate our minds--on a personal and collective level--and how we can prevent these patterns from manifesting negative situations in our daily lives.

This does not mean they should not be punished. I am not saying these people are innocent, although, it is true what Jesus is reported to have said on the cross when he said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." That is a very profound statement. They know not what they do means ... they cannot feel their humanity any longer.

SS: Will we be able to transcend this destructive behavior and evolve past the viral infection in the mind or are we destined to recreate our suffering again and again?

ET: Humans are destined to evolve into more conscious beings. Those humans who do not evolve, however, will have to suffer more. That is karma. They will have to suffer the consequences of their unconsciousness. The suffering that they inflict on other human beings, will eventually turn into suffering that they themselves will have to endure.

One of the most popular genres of literature for both adult and child readers is that of mystery and detective fiction. Some of the best opportunities for exploring brilliantly written, high quality literature are mysteries. Some of the lightest and most addictive series fiction books are mysteries. Students hunting for mystery clues makes for careful reading and looking at the books analytically involves sequencing, summarization, and looking for patterns among other skills. In general mysteries cover such a broad range of settings and subject matter that they can easily be integrated across many areas of the curriculum.

Let's start with picture books that we can use with the youngest kids and then picture books of increasing complexity. Their very simplicity makes them useful for analytical work with older readers as well and for the reading aloud too often missing in the upper grades.

Tuesday by David Wiesner. (1991, Clarion. ISBN 9781435208629. Order Info .) Picture Book. 32 pages. Gr PreK-8.
This is a picture book example of puzzles and crime mysteries, although you may not have thought of it that way. Even before the title page we are aware that frogs—one frog at least—is levitating in the marsh. By the first words in the book, "Tuesday Evening, around eight," frogs on their lily pads are zooming around, looping and diving. They're off to town where they startle a late night snacker, decimate a clothesline, and invade the house of an old woman snoozing before her TV.

Keeper of the Lost Cities is a children’s fantasy book written by Shannon Messenger. The book is aimed at children from 10 years and up, but the children in the book are around 12-14 years old. Keeper of the Lost Cities is the first book in a fantasy series about Sophie Foster.

I will heartily recommend this book to all lovers of the fantasy genre, children and adults alike, but perhaps especially to those who feel different, like many of the children we call “Star children” do.

Like many others I would like for the reputed Housework Fairies to be a reality. I had worked on FiP with a child’s torch that projected images of the solar system, and was intrigued to find that there was a pink (obviously) version that projected images of unicorns and fairies. I tried it out at Imber at Christmas, but at minus 4 degrees it was too cold for my brain to work out how to focus it. Back in a centrally heated house, I started to play. There are the projections, but there’s also the possibility of using fairy lights within domestic appliances.

Again, thanks to OCA input I have ordered a couple of flexible “arms” with clamps/clips that will allow me more flexibility in positioning and stabilising the torch, and hence the tripod, especially in smaller spaces.

Contextually, there is something to dig into here. My Grandmothers and their mothers would have laughed roundly at me complaining about housework, given that I have machines that do so much of it, a small family that was entirely of my choosing, and I am currently in the fortunate position of being a most-of-the-time student and some-of-the-time amateur musician whilst my young daughter is at school. I have a partner who’s happy to share some of the load, particularly cooking. My two northern grannies would have looked at the flashing LEDs and jingles on the various appliances and pointed out that I have no need of fairies.

A fairy (also fata , fay , fey [1] , fae , fair folk ; from faery , faerie , "realm of the fays ") is a type of mythical being or legendary creature in European folklore , a form of spirit , often described as metaphysical , supernatural , or preternatural .

According to Thomas Keightley , the word "fairy" derives from the Latin fata , and is from the Old French form faerie , describing "enchantment". Other forms are the Italian fata , and the Proven├žal "fada". In old French romance, "fee" was a woman skilled in magic, and who knew the power and virtue of words, of stones, and of herbs. [2]

Faie became Modern English fay . Faierie became fairy , but with that spelling now almost exclusively referring to one of the legendary people, with the same meaning as fay . The word "fairy" was used to represent an illusion, or enchantment; the land of the Faes; collectively the inhabitants thereof; or an individual such as a fairy knight. [2]

In the second part of the interview series with Eckhart Tolle entitled, Changing the World from Within , Suza Scalora speaks with Tolle about how our negative thought patterns often dominate our minds--on a personal and collective level--and how we can prevent these patterns from manifesting negative situations in our daily lives.

This does not mean they should not be punished. I am not saying these people are innocent, although, it is true what Jesus is reported to have said on the cross when he said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." That is a very profound statement. They know not what they do means ... they cannot feel their humanity any longer.

SS: Will we be able to transcend this destructive behavior and evolve past the viral infection in the mind or are we destined to recreate our suffering again and again?

ET: Humans are destined to evolve into more conscious beings. Those humans who do not evolve, however, will have to suffer more. That is karma. They will have to suffer the consequences of their unconsciousness. The suffering that they inflict on other human beings, will eventually turn into suffering that they themselves will have to endure.

One of the most popular genres of literature for both adult and child readers is that of mystery and detective fiction. Some of the best opportunities for exploring brilliantly written, high quality literature are mysteries. Some of the lightest and most addictive series fiction books are mysteries. Students hunting for mystery clues makes for careful reading and looking at the books analytically involves sequencing, summarization, and looking for patterns among other skills. In general mysteries cover such a broad range of settings and subject matter that they can easily be integrated across many areas of the curriculum.

Let's start with picture books that we can use with the youngest kids and then picture books of increasing complexity. Their very simplicity makes them useful for analytical work with older readers as well and for the reading aloud too often missing in the upper grades.

Tuesday by David Wiesner. (1991, Clarion. ISBN 9781435208629. Order Info .) Picture Book. 32 pages. Gr PreK-8.
This is a picture book example of puzzles and crime mysteries, although you may not have thought of it that way. Even before the title page we are aware that frogs—one frog at least—is levitating in the marsh. By the first words in the book, "Tuesday Evening, around eight," frogs on their lily pads are zooming around, looping and diving. They're off to town where they startle a late night snacker, decimate a clothesline, and invade the house of an old woman snoozing before her TV.

Keeper of the Lost Cities is a children’s fantasy book written by Shannon Messenger. The book is aimed at children from 10 years and up, but the children in the book are around 12-14 years old. Keeper of the Lost Cities is the first book in a fantasy series about Sophie Foster.

I will heartily recommend this book to all lovers of the fantasy genre, children and adults alike, but perhaps especially to those who feel different, like many of the children we call “Star children” do.

In the second part of the interview series with Eckhart Tolle entitled, Changing the World from Within , Suza Scalora speaks with Tolle about how our negative thought patterns often dominate our minds--on a personal and collective level--and how we can prevent these patterns from manifesting negative situations in our daily lives.

This does not mean they should not be punished. I am not saying these people are innocent, although, it is true what Jesus is reported to have said on the cross when he said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." That is a very profound statement. They know not what they do means ... they cannot feel their humanity any longer.

SS: Will we be able to transcend this destructive behavior and evolve past the viral infection in the mind or are we destined to recreate our suffering again and again?

ET: Humans are destined to evolve into more conscious beings. Those humans who do not evolve, however, will have to suffer more. That is karma. They will have to suffer the consequences of their unconsciousness. The suffering that they inflict on other human beings, will eventually turn into suffering that they themselves will have to endure.

One of the most popular genres of literature for both adult and child readers is that of mystery and detective fiction. Some of the best opportunities for exploring brilliantly written, high quality literature are mysteries. Some of the lightest and most addictive series fiction books are mysteries. Students hunting for mystery clues makes for careful reading and looking at the books analytically involves sequencing, summarization, and looking for patterns among other skills. In general mysteries cover such a broad range of settings and subject matter that they can easily be integrated across many areas of the curriculum.

Let's start with picture books that we can use with the youngest kids and then picture books of increasing complexity. Their very simplicity makes them useful for analytical work with older readers as well and for the reading aloud too often missing in the upper grades.

Tuesday by David Wiesner. (1991, Clarion. ISBN 9781435208629. Order Info .) Picture Book. 32 pages. Gr PreK-8.
This is a picture book example of puzzles and crime mysteries, although you may not have thought of it that way. Even before the title page we are aware that frogs—one frog at least—is levitating in the marsh. By the first words in the book, "Tuesday Evening, around eight," frogs on their lily pads are zooming around, looping and diving. They're off to town where they startle a late night snacker, decimate a clothesline, and invade the house of an old woman snoozing before her TV.

In the second part of the interview series with Eckhart Tolle entitled, Changing the World from Within , Suza Scalora speaks with Tolle about how our negative thought patterns often dominate our minds--on a personal and collective level--and how we can prevent these patterns from manifesting negative situations in our daily lives.

This does not mean they should not be punished. I am not saying these people are innocent, although, it is true what Jesus is reported to have said on the cross when he said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." That is a very profound statement. They know not what they do means ... they cannot feel their humanity any longer.

SS: Will we be able to transcend this destructive behavior and evolve past the viral infection in the mind or are we destined to recreate our suffering again and again?

ET: Humans are destined to evolve into more conscious beings. Those humans who do not evolve, however, will have to suffer more. That is karma. They will have to suffer the consequences of their unconsciousness. The suffering that they inflict on other human beings, will eventually turn into suffering that they themselves will have to endure.

In the second part of the interview series with Eckhart Tolle entitled, Changing the World from Within , Suza Scalora speaks with Tolle about how our negative thought patterns often dominate our minds--on a personal and collective level--and how we can prevent these patterns from manifesting negative situations in our daily lives.

This does not mean they should not be punished. I am not saying these people are innocent, although, it is true what Jesus is reported to have said on the cross when he said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." That is a very profound statement. They know not what they do means ... they cannot feel their humanity any longer.

SS: Will we be able to transcend this destructive behavior and evolve past the viral infection in the mind or are we destined to recreate our suffering again and again?

ET: Humans are destined to evolve into more conscious beings. Those humans who do not evolve, however, will have to suffer more. That is karma. They will have to suffer the consequences of their unconsciousness. The suffering that they inflict on other human beings, will eventually turn into suffering that they themselves will have to endure.

One of the most popular genres of literature for both adult and child readers is that of mystery and detective fiction. Some of the best opportunities for exploring brilliantly written, high quality literature are mysteries. Some of the lightest and most addictive series fiction books are mysteries. Students hunting for mystery clues makes for careful reading and looking at the books analytically involves sequencing, summarization, and looking for patterns among other skills. In general mysteries cover such a broad range of settings and subject matter that they can easily be integrated across many areas of the curriculum.

Let's start with picture books that we can use with the youngest kids and then picture books of increasing complexity. Their very simplicity makes them useful for analytical work with older readers as well and for the reading aloud too often missing in the upper grades.

Tuesday by David Wiesner. (1991, Clarion. ISBN 9781435208629. Order Info .) Picture Book. 32 pages. Gr PreK-8.
This is a picture book example of puzzles and crime mysteries, although you may not have thought of it that way. Even before the title page we are aware that frogs—one frog at least—is levitating in the marsh. By the first words in the book, "Tuesday Evening, around eight," frogs on their lily pads are zooming around, looping and diving. They're off to town where they startle a late night snacker, decimate a clothesline, and invade the house of an old woman snoozing before her TV.

Keeper of the Lost Cities is a children’s fantasy book written by Shannon Messenger. The book is aimed at children from 10 years and up, but the children in the book are around 12-14 years old. Keeper of the Lost Cities is the first book in a fantasy series about Sophie Foster.

I will heartily recommend this book to all lovers of the fantasy genre, children and adults alike, but perhaps especially to those who feel different, like many of the children we call “Star children” do.

Like many others I would like for the reputed Housework Fairies to be a reality. I had worked on FiP with a child’s torch that projected images of the solar system, and was intrigued to find that there was a pink (obviously) version that projected images of unicorns and fairies. I tried it out at Imber at Christmas, but at minus 4 degrees it was too cold for my brain to work out how to focus it. Back in a centrally heated house, I started to play. There are the projections, but there’s also the possibility of using fairy lights within domestic appliances.

Again, thanks to OCA input I have ordered a couple of flexible “arms” with clamps/clips that will allow me more flexibility in positioning and stabilising the torch, and hence the tripod, especially in smaller spaces.

Contextually, there is something to dig into here. My Grandmothers and their mothers would have laughed roundly at me complaining about housework, given that I have machines that do so much of it, a small family that was entirely of my choosing, and I am currently in the fortunate position of being a most-of-the-time student and some-of-the-time amateur musician whilst my young daughter is at school. I have a partner who’s happy to share some of the load, particularly cooking. My two northern grannies would have looked at the flashing LEDs and jingles on the various appliances and pointed out that I have no need of fairies.

Fairies and Fake News: Lessons of the 1917. - TIME


Cottingley Fairies - Reflections on the cottingley fairies.

Posted by 2018 article

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