Uploaded by Alyson-Wieczorek on March 13, 2008

Uploaded by Alyson-Wieczorek on March 13, 2008

The story of the two Indian saints was ultimately derived, through a variety of intermediate versions ( Arabic and Georgian ), from the life story of the Buddha. [4] [5]

Wilfred Cantwell Smith (1981) traced the story from a 2nd to 4th century Sanskrit Mahayana Buddhist text, to a Manichaean version, which then found its way into Muslim culture as the Arabic Kitab Bilawhar wa-Yudasaf (Book of Bilawhar and Yudasaf), which was current in Baghdad in the 8th century. [6]

The Bilauhar u Buddsaf story was translated into Pahlavi during the Sasanian period , and into Arabic in the Islamic era. [7] This is not a strict translation of the Sanskrit Buddhacarita (Life of Buddha) but a collection of legends. [8]

The Greek version relates the story of an Indian king who learns from his astrologers that his son Iosaph will be converted to Christianity and in order to prevent him from seeing the distress and misery of human life locks him up in a palace. The plan fails, however, and the prince both sees sick, blind, and old people and witnesses death and so begins to ponder the vanity of life. When God sends him the pious hermit Barlaam, the prince is converted to Christianity. In vain his father tries to win him back, but the prince renounces the throne, converts his father and his people, and retires as a hermit. After his death he works many miracles.

The novel is a syncretic compilation of Buddha stories ultimately derived from such works as Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita (Career of the Buddha; 1st-­2nd cents.), the Lalitavistara (an early Mahāyāna text), the Mahāvastu (from the canon of the Mahāsaṅgikas), and the Pali Jātaka tales (see Lang, in EI 2 I, p.1216).

J. P. Asmussen, “Der Manichä­ismus als Vermittler literarischen Gutes,” Temenos 2,Helsinki, 1966, pp. 5ff.

Uploaded by Alyson-Wieczorek on March 13, 2008

The story of the two Indian saints was ultimately derived, through a variety of intermediate versions ( Arabic and Georgian ), from the life story of the Buddha. [4] [5]

Wilfred Cantwell Smith (1981) traced the story from a 2nd to 4th century Sanskrit Mahayana Buddhist text, to a Manichaean version, which then found its way into Muslim culture as the Arabic Kitab Bilawhar wa-Yudasaf (Book of Bilawhar and Yudasaf), which was current in Baghdad in the 8th century. [6]

The Bilauhar u Buddsaf story was translated into Pahlavi during the Sasanian period , and into Arabic in the Islamic era. [7] This is not a strict translation of the Sanskrit Buddhacarita (Life of Buddha) but a collection of legends. [8]

Barlaam and Ioasaph John Damascene | Harvard University.


BARLAAM AND IOASAPH - OMACL

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