High-quality early learning provides young children with the foundation that enables healthy development and academic success. Research finds long-term benefits throughout school and beyond—including greater educational attainment and life success—especially for English learners and children from low-income households. High-leverage strategies that can help make the most of dollars spent on early childhood education include:

High-quality early learning provides young children with the foundation that enables healthy development and academic success. Research finds long-term benefits throughout school and beyond—including greater educational attainment and life success—especially for English learners and children from low-income households. High-leverage strategies that can help make the most of dollars spent on early childhood education include:

Michigan's Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Infant and Toddler Programs provides both a framework describing children's development and learning and the quality standards for environments that enable infants and toddlers to progress in their development and learning.

In 2011, the Office of Great Start was created by Executive Order to lead the Great Start System to achieve the following Prenatal to Age 8 Outcomes: 1) Children born healthy, 2) Children healthy, thriving, and developmentally on track from birth to third grade, 3) Children developmentally ready to succeed I school at the time of school entry, and 4) Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of third grade. To achieve these outcomes a project to update, expand, and revise the Early Childhood Standards of Quality documents was undertaken, and subsequently approved by the State Board of Education on March 12, 2013.

The first section of the Standards describes early development, organized into 5 “strands”: well-being, belonging, exploration, communication, and contribution. Each strand offers goals, examples of skill development, and examples of caregiver strategies for supporting that development. The second half of the Standards describes Quality Program Standards for Infant and Toddler Programs. Topics include: funding, community support, physical and mental health, nutrition and safety, staffing and professional development, program environment, curriculum, and child and program assessment.

Economist Robert G. Lynch found that investment in high quality prekindergarten programs generates billions of dollars in economic and other benefits for the federal and state governments. The study, Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation , published by the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute, shows huge benefits whether programs are universal or targeted to three- and four-year-old children from poor families.
Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation  (May 2007) - EPI.

A longitudinal study of participants in a Chicago public schools program serving preK through third grade students reported that at age 24 program participants had acquired more education and were less likely to commit crimes than those who did not receive the same level of service. This study is a 19-year followup report in an ongoing study of Chicago's Child-Parent Center program, which appears in the August 2007 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, a monthly journal.

New Mexico's preK initiative is paying off for its four-year-old participants in greater improvement in early language, literacy, and math development, according to The Effects of the New Mexico PreK Initiative on Young Children's School Readiness , a study released August 2007 by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University. The research was conducted by Jason T. Hustedt, W. Steven Barnett, and Kwanghee Jung.

High-quality early learning provides young children with the foundation that enables healthy development and academic success. Research finds long-term benefits throughout school and beyond—including greater educational attainment and life success—especially for English learners and children from low-income households. High-leverage strategies that can help make the most of dollars spent on early childhood education include:

Michigan's Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Infant and Toddler Programs provides both a framework describing children's development and learning and the quality standards for environments that enable infants and toddlers to progress in their development and learning.

In 2011, the Office of Great Start was created by Executive Order to lead the Great Start System to achieve the following Prenatal to Age 8 Outcomes: 1) Children born healthy, 2) Children healthy, thriving, and developmentally on track from birth to third grade, 3) Children developmentally ready to succeed I school at the time of school entry, and 4) Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of third grade. To achieve these outcomes a project to update, expand, and revise the Early Childhood Standards of Quality documents was undertaken, and subsequently approved by the State Board of Education on March 12, 2013.

The first section of the Standards describes early development, organized into 5 “strands”: well-being, belonging, exploration, communication, and contribution. Each strand offers goals, examples of skill development, and examples of caregiver strategies for supporting that development. The second half of the Standards describes Quality Program Standards for Infant and Toddler Programs. Topics include: funding, community support, physical and mental health, nutrition and safety, staffing and professional development, program environment, curriculum, and child and program assessment.

Economist Robert G. Lynch found that investment in high quality prekindergarten programs generates billions of dollars in economic and other benefits for the federal and state governments. The study, Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation , published by the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute, shows huge benefits whether programs are universal or targeted to three- and four-year-old children from poor families.
Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation  (May 2007) - EPI.

A longitudinal study of participants in a Chicago public schools program serving preK through third grade students reported that at age 24 program participants had acquired more education and were less likely to commit crimes than those who did not receive the same level of service. This study is a 19-year followup report in an ongoing study of Chicago's Child-Parent Center program, which appears in the August 2007 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, a monthly journal.

New Mexico's preK initiative is paying off for its four-year-old participants in greater improvement in early language, literacy, and math development, according to The Effects of the New Mexico PreK Initiative on Young Children's School Readiness , a study released August 2007 by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University. The research was conducted by Jason T. Hustedt, W. Steven Barnett, and Kwanghee Jung.

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The comments on this article were provided by members of an invited reaction panel in the session “Quality Improvement in Early Childhood Teacher Education: Faculty Perspectives and Recommendations for the Future,” presented in June 2008 at the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) National Institute on Early Childhood Professional Development in New Orleans, Louisiana. The panelists brought to bear their expertise in teacher education at the associate, baccalaureate, and graduate program levels as well as perspectives from state and national initiatives to improve the quality of early childhood professional preparation.

Linda M. Espinosa
Early Childhood Faculty and the Language of Research—Evidence for Improvement: A Response to Hyson et al.

Elaine Surbeck
Put “Academic Content” in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Teacher Education: A Response to Hyson et al.

High-quality early learning provides young children with the foundation that enables healthy development and academic success. Research finds long-term benefits throughout school and beyond—including greater educational attainment and life success—especially for English learners and children from low-income households. High-leverage strategies that can help make the most of dollars spent on early childhood education include:

Michigan's Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Infant and Toddler Programs provides both a framework describing children's development and learning and the quality standards for environments that enable infants and toddlers to progress in their development and learning.

In 2011, the Office of Great Start was created by Executive Order to lead the Great Start System to achieve the following Prenatal to Age 8 Outcomes: 1) Children born healthy, 2) Children healthy, thriving, and developmentally on track from birth to third grade, 3) Children developmentally ready to succeed I school at the time of school entry, and 4) Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of third grade. To achieve these outcomes a project to update, expand, and revise the Early Childhood Standards of Quality documents was undertaken, and subsequently approved by the State Board of Education on March 12, 2013.

The first section of the Standards describes early development, organized into 5 “strands”: well-being, belonging, exploration, communication, and contribution. Each strand offers goals, examples of skill development, and examples of caregiver strategies for supporting that development. The second half of the Standards describes Quality Program Standards for Infant and Toddler Programs. Topics include: funding, community support, physical and mental health, nutrition and safety, staffing and professional development, program environment, curriculum, and child and program assessment.

High-quality early learning provides young children with the foundation that enables healthy development and academic success. Research finds long-term benefits throughout school and beyond—including greater educational attainment and life success—especially for English learners and children from low-income households. High-leverage strategies that can help make the most of dollars spent on early childhood education include:

Michigan's Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Infant and Toddler Programs provides both a framework describing children's development and learning and the quality standards for environments that enable infants and toddlers to progress in their development and learning.

In 2011, the Office of Great Start was created by Executive Order to lead the Great Start System to achieve the following Prenatal to Age 8 Outcomes: 1) Children born healthy, 2) Children healthy, thriving, and developmentally on track from birth to third grade, 3) Children developmentally ready to succeed I school at the time of school entry, and 4) Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of third grade. To achieve these outcomes a project to update, expand, and revise the Early Childhood Standards of Quality documents was undertaken, and subsequently approved by the State Board of Education on March 12, 2013.

The first section of the Standards describes early development, organized into 5 “strands”: well-being, belonging, exploration, communication, and contribution. Each strand offers goals, examples of skill development, and examples of caregiver strategies for supporting that development. The second half of the Standards describes Quality Program Standards for Infant and Toddler Programs. Topics include: funding, community support, physical and mental health, nutrition and safety, staffing and professional development, program environment, curriculum, and child and program assessment.

Economist Robert G. Lynch found that investment in high quality prekindergarten programs generates billions of dollars in economic and other benefits for the federal and state governments. The study, Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation , published by the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute, shows huge benefits whether programs are universal or targeted to three- and four-year-old children from poor families.
Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation  (May 2007) - EPI.

A longitudinal study of participants in a Chicago public schools program serving preK through third grade students reported that at age 24 program participants had acquired more education and were less likely to commit crimes than those who did not receive the same level of service. This study is a 19-year followup report in an ongoing study of Chicago's Child-Parent Center program, which appears in the August 2007 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, a monthly journal.

New Mexico's preK initiative is paying off for its four-year-old participants in greater improvement in early language, literacy, and math development, according to The Effects of the New Mexico PreK Initiative on Young Children's School Readiness , a study released August 2007 by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University. The research was conducted by Jason T. Hustedt, W. Steven Barnett, and Kwanghee Jung.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Half a Childhood: Quality Programs for Out-of-school Hours.


Half a Childhood: Quality Programs for Out-of-School Hours.

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