The Spanish Armada campaign of 1588 changed the course of European history. If the Duke of Parma’s 27,000 strong invasion force had safely crossed the narrow seas from Flanders, the survival of Elizabeth I’s government and Protestant England would have looked doubtful indeed. If those battle-hardened Spanish troops had landed, as planned, near Margate on the Kent coast, it is likely that they would have been in the poorly defended streets of London within a week and the queen and her ministers captured or killed. England would have reverted to the Catholic faith and there may have not been a British Empire to come.

It was bad luck, bad tactics and bad weather that defeated the Spanish Armada—not the derring-do displayed on the high seas by Elizabeth’s intrepid sea dogs.


The Spanish Armada off the English coast, historical painting by Cornelis Claesz. van Wieringen (1620-1625) via Wikimedia Commons .

Home / Primary / Curriculum / Content / Lessons & Exemplars / Lessons - Tudors & Stuarts / The Spanish Armada

This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

We introduced the story of the Armada, outlining the main parties involved and the nature of the conflict. We gave the children a problem to solve, taking two perspectives: those of the English and the Spanish.

The Spanish Armada sailed from Spain in July 1588. The Spanish Armada’s task was to overthrow protestant England lead by Queen Elizabeth I. The Spanish Armada proved to be an expensive disaster for the Spanish  but for the English it was a celebrated victory making Sir Francis Drake even more of a hero than he already was and even having an impact on Tudor Christmas celebrations!

The story of the Spanish Armada is one of mistakes all the way through. Even before the Armada sailed, serious problems were encountered:

With all that had been going on, it was very difficult for the Spanish to keep the Armada a secret. In fact, they were keen to let the English know about the Armada as it was felt that the English would be terrified at the news of such a large fleet of naval ships attacking them. 

Welcome to the Spanish Armada in Scotland documentary and research project. If you would like to know more about the project or have information you would like to share about the Armada in Scotland, please contact me at: [email protected] or on Facebook at @ SpanishArmadaScotland .

The Spanish Armada campaign of 1588 changed the course of European history. If the Duke of Parma’s 27,000 strong invasion force had safely crossed the narrow seas from Flanders, the survival of Elizabeth I’s government and Protestant England would have looked doubtful indeed. If those battle-hardened Spanish troops had landed, as planned, near Margate on the Kent coast, it is likely that they would have been in the poorly defended streets of London within a week and the queen and her ministers captured or killed. England would have reverted to the Catholic faith and there may have not been a British Empire to come.

It was bad luck, bad tactics and bad weather that defeated the Spanish Armada—not the derring-do displayed on the high seas by Elizabeth’s intrepid sea dogs.


The Spanish Armada off the English coast, historical painting by Cornelis Claesz. van Wieringen (1620-1625) via Wikimedia Commons .

Home / Primary / Curriculum / Content / Lessons & Exemplars / Lessons - Tudors & Stuarts / The Spanish Armada

This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

We introduced the story of the Armada, outlining the main parties involved and the nature of the conflict. We gave the children a problem to solve, taking two perspectives: those of the English and the Spanish.

The Spanish Armada sailed from Spain in July 1588. The Spanish Armada’s task was to overthrow protestant England lead by Queen Elizabeth I. The Spanish Armada proved to be an expensive disaster for the Spanish  but for the English it was a celebrated victory making Sir Francis Drake even more of a hero than he already was and even having an impact on Tudor Christmas celebrations!

The story of the Spanish Armada is one of mistakes all the way through. Even before the Armada sailed, serious problems were encountered:

With all that had been going on, it was very difficult for the Spanish to keep the Armada a secret. In fact, they were keen to let the English know about the Armada as it was felt that the English would be terrified at the news of such a large fleet of naval ships attacking them. 

The Spanish Armada campaign of 1588 changed the course of European history. If the Duke of Parma’s 27,000 strong invasion force had safely crossed the narrow seas from Flanders, the survival of Elizabeth I’s government and Protestant England would have looked doubtful indeed. If those battle-hardened Spanish troops had landed, as planned, near Margate on the Kent coast, it is likely that they would have been in the poorly defended streets of London within a week and the queen and her ministers captured or killed. England would have reverted to the Catholic faith and there may have not been a British Empire to come.

It was bad luck, bad tactics and bad weather that defeated the Spanish Armada—not the derring-do displayed on the high seas by Elizabeth’s intrepid sea dogs.


The Spanish Armada off the English coast, historical painting by Cornelis Claesz. van Wieringen (1620-1625) via Wikimedia Commons .

Home / Primary / Curriculum / Content / Lessons & Exemplars / Lessons - Tudors & Stuarts / The Spanish Armada

This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

We introduced the story of the Armada, outlining the main parties involved and the nature of the conflict. We gave the children a problem to solve, taking two perspectives: those of the English and the Spanish.

The Spanish Armada campaign of 1588 changed the course of European history. If the Duke of Parma’s 27,000 strong invasion force had safely crossed the narrow seas from Flanders, the survival of Elizabeth I’s government and Protestant England would have looked doubtful indeed. If those battle-hardened Spanish troops had landed, as planned, near Margate on the Kent coast, it is likely that they would have been in the poorly defended streets of London within a week and the queen and her ministers captured or killed. England would have reverted to the Catholic faith and there may have not been a British Empire to come.

It was bad luck, bad tactics and bad weather that defeated the Spanish Armada—not the derring-do displayed on the high seas by Elizabeth’s intrepid sea dogs.


The Spanish Armada off the English coast, historical painting by Cornelis Claesz. van Wieringen (1620-1625) via Wikimedia Commons .

The Spanish Armada campaign of 1588 changed the course of European history. If the Duke of Parma’s 27,000 strong invasion force had safely crossed the narrow seas from Flanders, the survival of Elizabeth I’s government and Protestant England would have looked doubtful indeed. If those battle-hardened Spanish troops had landed, as planned, near Margate on the Kent coast, it is likely that they would have been in the poorly defended streets of London within a week and the queen and her ministers captured or killed. England would have reverted to the Catholic faith and there may have not been a British Empire to come.

It was bad luck, bad tactics and bad weather that defeated the Spanish Armada—not the derring-do displayed on the high seas by Elizabeth’s intrepid sea dogs.


The Spanish Armada off the English coast, historical painting by Cornelis Claesz. van Wieringen (1620-1625) via Wikimedia Commons .

Home / Primary / Curriculum / Content / Lessons & Exemplars / Lessons - Tudors & Stuarts / The Spanish Armada

This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

We introduced the story of the Armada, outlining the main parties involved and the nature of the conflict. We gave the children a problem to solve, taking two perspectives: those of the English and the Spanish.

The Spanish Armada sailed from Spain in July 1588. The Spanish Armada’s task was to overthrow protestant England lead by Queen Elizabeth I. The Spanish Armada proved to be an expensive disaster for the Spanish  but for the English it was a celebrated victory making Sir Francis Drake even more of a hero than he already was and even having an impact on Tudor Christmas celebrations!

The story of the Spanish Armada is one of mistakes all the way through. Even before the Armada sailed, serious problems were encountered:

With all that had been going on, it was very difficult for the Spanish to keep the Armada a secret. In fact, they were keen to let the English know about the Armada as it was felt that the English would be terrified at the news of such a large fleet of naval ships attacking them. 

Welcome to the Spanish Armada in Scotland documentary and research project. If you would like to know more about the project or have information you would like to share about the Armada in Scotland, please contact me at: [email protected] or on Facebook at @ SpanishArmadaScotland .

The Spanish Armada (Spanish language: Grande y Felicísima Armada or Armada Invencible , literally "Great and Most Fortunate Navy" or "Invincible Fleet") was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in 1588.

The Armada suffered a decisive defeat and accomplished nothing. [10] [11] As Martin and Parker explain, "Philip II attempted to invade England, but his plans miscarried, partly because of his own mismanagement, and partly because the defensive efforts of the English and their Dutch allies prevailed." [12] Much of the blame has been borne by its commander the Duke of Medina Sidonia . The goal had been to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I of England and end her involvement in the Spanish Netherlands and her privateering in the Atlantic and Pacific.

The expedition was the largest engagement of the undeclared Anglo–Spanish War (1585–1604) . The following year England organised a similar large-scale campaign against Spain, the Drake-Norris Expedition , also known as the Counter Armada of 1589, which was unsuccessful.

The Spanish Armada, 1588 - Historic UK: Heritage.


BBC Bitesize - KS3 History - The Spanish Armada - Revision 1

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