As a tragic hero, Silas must be presented as being a better than average man. His great wealth places him out of the ordinary realm of men. Additionally, he must have a tragic flaw; Silas fulfills this by having a desire for wealth above all considerations and by having an exalted pride in his wealth. As a comic character, he must display some quirks that are not moral flaws or characteristics that are not damning. Silas likes to brag, for instance, about his family, his paint, and his new home. He, also, has false social aspirations, as illustrated by his building a new home which he thinks will put him on the same social level with the Coreys.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

“Some people,” Miss R said, “run to conceits or wisdom but I hold to the hard, brown, nutlike word. I might point out that there is enough aesthetic excitement here to satisfy anyone but a damned fool.”

Case in point: The word “plasma.” According to the OED, its meaning in classical Latin was an “affected modulation of the voice.” In post-classical Latin it also meant “creature” and “poetic fiction.”

In English, originally, it meant a pot. Or “anything shaped or molded.” Later, long before it came to be associated with blood or the breath of the sun , it also meant in English “a green variety of chalcedony ,  valued as a semi-precious stone, and formerly used for carving into intaglios .” In this sense it was short for plasma emerald .

The Rise of Silas Lapham is a realist novel by William Dean Howells published in 1885. The story follows the materialistic rise of Silas Lapham from rags to riches , and his ensuing moral susceptibility. Silas earns a fortune in the paint business, but he lacks social standards, which he tries to attain through his daughter's marriage into the aristocratic Corey family. Silas' morality does not fail him. He loses his money but makes the right moral decision when his partner proposes the unethical selling of the mills to English settlers.

Howells is known to be the father of American realism , and a denouncer of the sentimental novel . The resolution of the love triangle of Irene Lapham, Tom Corey, and Penelope Lapham highlights Howells' rejection of the conventions of sentimental romantic novels as unrealistic and deceitful.

The novel begins with Silas Lapham being interviewed for a newspaper profile, during which he explains his financial success in the mineral paint business. The Lapham family is somewhat self-conscious in their sudden rise on the social ladder and often fumble in their attempts at following etiquette norms. They decide to build a new home in the fashionable Back Bay neighborhood, and Lapham spares no expense ensuring it is at the height of fashion.

It’s me again. Can you help me understand Kant?I’m stuck with his notion of “purposiveness without a purpose.” What significance does it hold for Kant’s claims about the human value of aesthetic judgment? I read this many times, but the more I read it, it confuses me more.

As far as I know, that’s Kant’s definition of the aesthetic. The aesthetic, to Kant, should be non-utilitarian (spelling). A knife is utilitarian-you use it to cut something with, but a poem is not utilitarian-you don’t use it to “do” something practical.

To put it differently, a work of art is not something that has a (utilitarian) function or “purpose.” But, that does not mean that the work of art does not have a purpose within its non-utilitarian realm.It has a purpose within the purpose-less (non-utilitarian) context. Take a beautiful tie for example. Its beauty lies, first, in the fact that it does not have a utilitarian purpose (I don’t have to wear a tie). But in the sense that the tie is carefully designed and produced, it has its purpose: it is meant to be beautiful, aesthetic.

As a tragic hero, Silas must be presented as being a better than average man. His great wealth places him out of the ordinary realm of men. Additionally, he must have a tragic flaw; Silas fulfills this by having a desire for wealth above all considerations and by having an exalted pride in his wealth. As a comic character, he must display some quirks that are not moral flaws or characteristics that are not damning. Silas likes to brag, for instance, about his family, his paint, and his new home. He, also, has false social aspirations, as illustrated by his building a new home which he thinks will put him on the same social level with the Coreys.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

“Some people,” Miss R said, “run to conceits or wisdom but I hold to the hard, brown, nutlike word. I might point out that there is enough aesthetic excitement here to satisfy anyone but a damned fool.”

Case in point: The word “plasma.” According to the OED, its meaning in classical Latin was an “affected modulation of the voice.” In post-classical Latin it also meant “creature” and “poetic fiction.”

In English, originally, it meant a pot. Or “anything shaped or molded.” Later, long before it came to be associated with blood or the breath of the sun , it also meant in English “a green variety of chalcedony ,  valued as a semi-precious stone, and formerly used for carving into intaglios .” In this sense it was short for plasma emerald .

As a tragic hero, Silas must be presented as being a better than average man. His great wealth places him out of the ordinary realm of men. Additionally, he must have a tragic flaw; Silas fulfills this by having a desire for wealth above all considerations and by having an exalted pride in his wealth. As a comic character, he must display some quirks that are not moral flaws or characteristics that are not damning. Silas likes to brag, for instance, about his family, his paint, and his new home. He, also, has false social aspirations, as illustrated by his building a new home which he thinks will put him on the same social level with the Coreys.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

As a tragic hero, Silas must be presented as being a better than average man. His great wealth places him out of the ordinary realm of men. Additionally, he must have a tragic flaw; Silas fulfills this by having a desire for wealth above all considerations and by having an exalted pride in his wealth. As a comic character, he must display some quirks that are not moral flaws or characteristics that are not damning. Silas likes to brag, for instance, about his family, his paint, and his new home. He, also, has false social aspirations, as illustrated by his building a new home which he thinks will put him on the same social level with the Coreys.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

“Some people,” Miss R said, “run to conceits or wisdom but I hold to the hard, brown, nutlike word. I might point out that there is enough aesthetic excitement here to satisfy anyone but a damned fool.”

Case in point: The word “plasma.” According to the OED, its meaning in classical Latin was an “affected modulation of the voice.” In post-classical Latin it also meant “creature” and “poetic fiction.”

In English, originally, it meant a pot. Or “anything shaped or molded.” Later, long before it came to be associated with blood or the breath of the sun , it also meant in English “a green variety of chalcedony ,  valued as a semi-precious stone, and formerly used for carving into intaglios .” In this sense it was short for plasma emerald .

The Rise of Silas Lapham is a realist novel by William Dean Howells published in 1885. The story follows the materialistic rise of Silas Lapham from rags to riches , and his ensuing moral susceptibility. Silas earns a fortune in the paint business, but he lacks social standards, which he tries to attain through his daughter's marriage into the aristocratic Corey family. Silas' morality does not fail him. He loses his money but makes the right moral decision when his partner proposes the unethical selling of the mills to English settlers.

Howells is known to be the father of American realism , and a denouncer of the sentimental novel . The resolution of the love triangle of Irene Lapham, Tom Corey, and Penelope Lapham highlights Howells' rejection of the conventions of sentimental romantic novels as unrealistic and deceitful.

The novel begins with Silas Lapham being interviewed for a newspaper profile, during which he explains his financial success in the mineral paint business. The Lapham family is somewhat self-conscious in their sudden rise on the social ladder and often fumble in their attempts at following etiquette norms. They decide to build a new home in the fashionable Back Bay neighborhood, and Lapham spares no expense ensuring it is at the height of fashion.

The Project Gutenberg E-text of The Rise of Silas Lapham.


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