Doctor Aphra is actually Marvel's riskiest Star Wars project to date. It's the first series to focus on comic book-specific characters rather than those made famous by the movies and TV series. That also happens to be one of Doctor Aphra's biggest selling points. The distance from the movies gives Doctor Aphra a greater sense of freedom in terms of tone, style and plot possibilities. And it's immediately clear that writer Kieron Gillen and artist Kev Walker intend on taking advantage of that freedom.

This new series picks up in the aftermath of Gillen and Salvador Larroca's recently concluded Darth Vader comic. As far as Vader and the galaxy at large are concerned, Aphra is dead, leaving her free to resume her work as an opportunistic archaeologist. But that's not to say she doesn't have her fair share of problems. With Aphra owing massive piles of credits to both a criminal cartel and her "partner," Black Krrsantan and barely managing to keep a leash on her homicidal droids, her problems have hardly ended with her staged death.

Kev Walker immediately proves to be a great match for Gillen's storytelling sensibilities. Walker's quirky style channels both the seedy darkness of this corner of the Star Wars universe and the rampant humor. Unlike most of Marvel's Star Wars projects, realism isn't really the goal here. Instead, Walker focuses more on crafting unusual character designs and viscerally thrilling action scenes. Together with colorist Antonio Fabela, Walker gives these pages a gritty, grimy texture that very much suits Aphra's world.

Marvel releases  Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #15 this coming Wednesday, and we have a preview of the issue for you here; check it out…

Rogue archaeologist Doctor Aphra may be in over her head…
…but at least she’s not alone!  Er…let’s hope they’re friendly!

© 2009-2018 Flickering Myth Limited. All rights reserved. The reproduction, modification, distribution, or republication of the content (including RSS feeds) without permission is strictly prohibited. Movie titles, images, etc. are registered trademarks / copyright their respective rights holders. Read our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy / Cookie Disclaimer.

 

When readers last saw Dr. Aphra, she just survived exposure to the vacuum of space . Displeased with an apparent betrayal, Darth Vader threw her out an airlock. However, she had a contingency plan in place for just such an event. Her droids, Triple Zero and BT-1, along with the Wookiee Black Krrsantan rescued her before she died. Freed from the clutches of Darth Vader, Dr. Aphra begins her own adventures in the pages of Doctor Aphra #1. Those adventures start on the Cosmatanic Steppes of Archaeo-Prime (which were first seen in Darth Vader  #21).

The Indiana Jones  franchise clearly influenced Dr. Aphra . For instance, this issue opens with an archaeologist retrieving and artifact from within a cave. The recovery of the artifact triggers a trap. This archaeologist barely escapes with his life. It is certainly reminiscent of Dr. Jones escape from the temple at the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark . Even the artifact recovered resembles the idol from the temple in Raiders . However, this archaeologist meets a foul end.

The archaeologist, Ulik Tan, partnered with Dr. Aphra. At some point, he double crossed her and left her for dead. Unfortunately for him, she didn’t die, and she is waiting for him to emerge. Aphra isn’t Indiana Jones. In this case, if anyone, she is Dr. Belloq. She takes the artifact from Ulik. Anything he possesses, she can take. Then she kills him. In addition, she wasn’t making his mistake. From Dr. Aphra’s introduction in Darth Vader #3 , the Indiana Jones influence has always been present. Like Dr. Jones, she too is an archaeologist. However, her motives are considerably less pure.

Doctor Aphra is actually Marvel's riskiest Star Wars project to date. It's the first series to focus on comic book-specific characters rather than those made famous by the movies and TV series. That also happens to be one of Doctor Aphra's biggest selling points. The distance from the movies gives Doctor Aphra a greater sense of freedom in terms of tone, style and plot possibilities. And it's immediately clear that writer Kieron Gillen and artist Kev Walker intend on taking advantage of that freedom.

This new series picks up in the aftermath of Gillen and Salvador Larroca's recently concluded Darth Vader comic. As far as Vader and the galaxy at large are concerned, Aphra is dead, leaving her free to resume her work as an opportunistic archaeologist. But that's not to say she doesn't have her fair share of problems. With Aphra owing massive piles of credits to both a criminal cartel and her "partner," Black Krrsantan and barely managing to keep a leash on her homicidal droids, her problems have hardly ended with her staged death.

Kev Walker immediately proves to be a great match for Gillen's storytelling sensibilities. Walker's quirky style channels both the seedy darkness of this corner of the Star Wars universe and the rampant humor. Unlike most of Marvel's Star Wars projects, realism isn't really the goal here. Instead, Walker focuses more on crafting unusual character designs and viscerally thrilling action scenes. Together with colorist Antonio Fabela, Walker gives these pages a gritty, grimy texture that very much suits Aphra's world.

Marvel releases  Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #15 this coming Wednesday, and we have a preview of the issue for you here; check it out…

Rogue archaeologist Doctor Aphra may be in over her head…
…but at least she’s not alone!  Er…let’s hope they’re friendly!

© 2009-2018 Flickering Myth Limited. All rights reserved. The reproduction, modification, distribution, or republication of the content (including RSS feeds) without permission is strictly prohibited. Movie titles, images, etc. are registered trademarks / copyright their respective rights holders. Read our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy / Cookie Disclaimer.

 

Doctor Aphra is actually Marvel's riskiest Star Wars project to date. It's the first series to focus on comic book-specific characters rather than those made famous by the movies and TV series. That also happens to be one of Doctor Aphra's biggest selling points. The distance from the movies gives Doctor Aphra a greater sense of freedom in terms of tone, style and plot possibilities. And it's immediately clear that writer Kieron Gillen and artist Kev Walker intend on taking advantage of that freedom.

This new series picks up in the aftermath of Gillen and Salvador Larroca's recently concluded Darth Vader comic. As far as Vader and the galaxy at large are concerned, Aphra is dead, leaving her free to resume her work as an opportunistic archaeologist. But that's not to say she doesn't have her fair share of problems. With Aphra owing massive piles of credits to both a criminal cartel and her "partner," Black Krrsantan and barely managing to keep a leash on her homicidal droids, her problems have hardly ended with her staged death.

Kev Walker immediately proves to be a great match for Gillen's storytelling sensibilities. Walker's quirky style channels both the seedy darkness of this corner of the Star Wars universe and the rampant humor. Unlike most of Marvel's Star Wars projects, realism isn't really the goal here. Instead, Walker focuses more on crafting unusual character designs and viscerally thrilling action scenes. Together with colorist Antonio Fabela, Walker gives these pages a gritty, grimy texture that very much suits Aphra's world.

Doctor Aphra is actually Marvel's riskiest Star Wars project to date. It's the first series to focus on comic book-specific characters rather than those made famous by the movies and TV series. That also happens to be one of Doctor Aphra's biggest selling points. The distance from the movies gives Doctor Aphra a greater sense of freedom in terms of tone, style and plot possibilities. And it's immediately clear that writer Kieron Gillen and artist Kev Walker intend on taking advantage of that freedom.

This new series picks up in the aftermath of Gillen and Salvador Larroca's recently concluded Darth Vader comic. As far as Vader and the galaxy at large are concerned, Aphra is dead, leaving her free to resume her work as an opportunistic archaeologist. But that's not to say she doesn't have her fair share of problems. With Aphra owing massive piles of credits to both a criminal cartel and her "partner," Black Krrsantan and barely managing to keep a leash on her homicidal droids, her problems have hardly ended with her staged death.

Kev Walker immediately proves to be a great match for Gillen's storytelling sensibilities. Walker's quirky style channels both the seedy darkness of this corner of the Star Wars universe and the rampant humor. Unlike most of Marvel's Star Wars projects, realism isn't really the goal here. Instead, Walker focuses more on crafting unusual character designs and viscerally thrilling action scenes. Together with colorist Antonio Fabela, Walker gives these pages a gritty, grimy texture that very much suits Aphra's world.

Marvel releases  Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #15 this coming Wednesday, and we have a preview of the issue for you here; check it out…

Rogue archaeologist Doctor Aphra may be in over her head…
…but at least she’s not alone!  Er…let’s hope they’re friendly!

© 2009-2018 Flickering Myth Limited. All rights reserved. The reproduction, modification, distribution, or republication of the content (including RSS feeds) without permission is strictly prohibited. Movie titles, images, etc. are registered trademarks / copyright their respective rights holders. Read our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy / Cookie Disclaimer.

 

When readers last saw Dr. Aphra, she just survived exposure to the vacuum of space . Displeased with an apparent betrayal, Darth Vader threw her out an airlock. However, she had a contingency plan in place for just such an event. Her droids, Triple Zero and BT-1, along with the Wookiee Black Krrsantan rescued her before she died. Freed from the clutches of Darth Vader, Dr. Aphra begins her own adventures in the pages of Doctor Aphra #1. Those adventures start on the Cosmatanic Steppes of Archaeo-Prime (which were first seen in Darth Vader  #21).

The Indiana Jones  franchise clearly influenced Dr. Aphra . For instance, this issue opens with an archaeologist retrieving and artifact from within a cave. The recovery of the artifact triggers a trap. This archaeologist barely escapes with his life. It is certainly reminiscent of Dr. Jones escape from the temple at the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark . Even the artifact recovered resembles the idol from the temple in Raiders . However, this archaeologist meets a foul end.

The archaeologist, Ulik Tan, partnered with Dr. Aphra. At some point, he double crossed her and left her for dead. Unfortunately for him, she didn’t die, and she is waiting for him to emerge. Aphra isn’t Indiana Jones. In this case, if anyone, she is Dr. Belloq. She takes the artifact from Ulik. Anything he possesses, she can take. Then she kills him. In addition, she wasn’t making his mistake. From Dr. Aphra’s introduction in Darth Vader #3 , the Indiana Jones influence has always been present. Like Dr. Jones, she too is an archaeologist. However, her motives are considerably less pure.

Following her time in the clutches of Darth Vader, Doctor Aphra has barely escaped with her life. If he ever learns of her survival, he’ll hunt her to the ends of the galaxy. But for now, it’s time for a return to what she does best. With the droids 0-0-0 and BT-1 in tow, she’s off in search of rare artifacts from the galactic center to the Outer Rim and everywhere in between. Aphra’s got debts to pay after all. Just as long as she can stay one step ahead of the Empire, some Bounty Hunters and just about everyone else in the galaxy!

Chelli Lona Aphra | Wookieepedia | FANDOM powered


The Doctor Is In: New Doctor Aphra Ongoing Series Coming.

Posted by 2018 article

51bsADKoEYL