In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

I'm the creator of an alternate universe of the seven Harry Potter books, called Black Britain. Currently, I'm strapped for time with College and a job, and don't have much time to upload much. Black Britain's book three is out now, but still in progress. More information on it can be found in the second section of this.

After getting a question, I live in London, I'm american, but I'm roommates with my two British friends. I don't travel around the U.K much, but I've traveled to the United States (Was born there.) and to other places in Europe.

I have a bad habit of having, "Oh rich person, mountains of galleons!" happen alot in Gringotts because I don't really know where to turn, and almost every vault we're seen in the movies/heard about in the books has been like that. Also, I am fully willing to talk out rough patches in my stories, just sign in and leave me a review, and I'll get back to you shortly.

Stars Michael Keaton , Nick Offerman , John Carroll Lynch , Linda Cardellini , B.J. Novak

Genres Biography , Drama , History

In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

I'm the creator of an alternate universe of the seven Harry Potter books, called Black Britain. Currently, I'm strapped for time with College and a job, and don't have much time to upload much. Black Britain's book three is out now, but still in progress. More information on it can be found in the second section of this.

After getting a question, I live in London, I'm american, but I'm roommates with my two British friends. I don't travel around the U.K much, but I've traveled to the United States (Was born there.) and to other places in Europe.

I have a bad habit of having, "Oh rich person, mountains of galleons!" happen alot in Gringotts because I don't really know where to turn, and almost every vault we're seen in the movies/heard about in the books has been like that. Also, I am fully willing to talk out rough patches in my stories, just sign in and leave me a review, and I'll get back to you shortly.

Stars Michael Keaton , Nick Offerman , John Carroll Lynch , Linda Cardellini , B.J. Novak

Genres Biography , Drama , History

If Silicon Valley could dream, it would dream in video games. Those unconscious desires, the real libidinal images of the innovating classes—and not the avowed “dreams” of giving girls good STEM educations or blockchain-driven voting platforms—would probably look a lot like Francis Tseng’s dystopian business simulator The Founder.

“Disrupt the world,” instructs the game’s loading page. And if you manipulate your employees right, you can. Grow from a tiny start-up in a cozy Cambridge apartment in 2001 to a global megacorp producing hardware and software for the entertainment, military, biotech, and finance industries.

The Founder is a management sim à la Sim City, and play involves running your office, managing employees, massaging your corporate reputation, and keeping up hectic product schedules. The main activity of the game is to make as many products as possible while increasing employee productivity, and, of course, cutting costs.

Griffin Picciani, 14, doesn’t feel like a millennial. The New York City teenager looks at his early-20s cousins and easily recognizes the differences between his teenage years and theirs. Griffin only knows a black president. The video games he plays are miles away from the 8-bit consoles his cousins can remember. And perhaps most important, he and his friends can’t remember a time before Instagram and Snapchat.

“My age group has grown up with all of this social media at a much younger age,” Griffin says. “I think that’s given us a different perspective.”

Griffin is part of a generation that hasn’t been fully defined but appears to break from millennials—and one that doesn’t yet have a widely accepted name. MTV is looking to change that, and the network will announce a new name Wednesday: the Founders.

In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

I'm the creator of an alternate universe of the seven Harry Potter books, called Black Britain. Currently, I'm strapped for time with College and a job, and don't have much time to upload much. Black Britain's book three is out now, but still in progress. More information on it can be found in the second section of this.

After getting a question, I live in London, I'm american, but I'm roommates with my two British friends. I don't travel around the U.K much, but I've traveled to the United States (Was born there.) and to other places in Europe.

I have a bad habit of having, "Oh rich person, mountains of galleons!" happen alot in Gringotts because I don't really know where to turn, and almost every vault we're seen in the movies/heard about in the books has been like that. Also, I am fully willing to talk out rough patches in my stories, just sign in and leave me a review, and I'll get back to you shortly.

In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

In his illuminating Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers , Daniel L. Dreisbach shows how early Americans used the Bible both as an intellectual sourcebook and as a tool for moral instruction. He thinks “the Bible was the most authoritative, accessible, and familiar book in eighteenth-century America.” But be comforted, O Unbeliever! This book is not a work of Christian apologetics.

“A claim of biblical influence,” Dreisbach writes, “does not suggest that the founders were theocrats intent on imposing a biblical order on the polity.” On the contrary, he says, “Believers and skeptics alike made use of the Bible.” The American University professor is admirably cautious, avoiding the Scylla of making every Founder a deist and the Charybdis of making every reference to the Bible a mark of true Christian piety.

Nevertheless, Dreisbach has an agenda. He exhorts students of the Founding “to be attentive to how the founders read the Bible and its place in the political culture of the founding era.” His advice is not just for fellow academics. The “biblical illiteracy” of our age “inevitably distorts the conception Americans have of themselves as a people, the nation, and their political experiment in self-government.”

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

I'm the creator of an alternate universe of the seven Harry Potter books, called Black Britain. Currently, I'm strapped for time with College and a job, and don't have much time to upload much. Black Britain's book three is out now, but still in progress. More information on it can be found in the second section of this.

After getting a question, I live in London, I'm american, but I'm roommates with my two British friends. I don't travel around the U.K much, but I've traveled to the United States (Was born there.) and to other places in Europe.

I have a bad habit of having, "Oh rich person, mountains of galleons!" happen alot in Gringotts because I don't really know where to turn, and almost every vault we're seen in the movies/heard about in the books has been like that. Also, I am fully willing to talk out rough patches in my stories, just sign in and leave me a review, and I'll get back to you shortly.

Stars Michael Keaton , Nick Offerman , John Carroll Lynch , Linda Cardellini , B.J. Novak

Genres Biography , Drama , History

If Silicon Valley could dream, it would dream in video games. Those unconscious desires, the real libidinal images of the innovating classes—and not the avowed “dreams” of giving girls good STEM educations or blockchain-driven voting platforms—would probably look a lot like Francis Tseng’s dystopian business simulator The Founder.

“Disrupt the world,” instructs the game’s loading page. And if you manipulate your employees right, you can. Grow from a tiny start-up in a cozy Cambridge apartment in 2001 to a global megacorp producing hardware and software for the entertainment, military, biotech, and finance industries.

The Founder is a management sim à la Sim City, and play involves running your office, managing employees, massaging your corporate reputation, and keeping up hectic product schedules. The main activity of the game is to make as many products as possible while increasing employee productivity, and, of course, cutting costs.

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The Founder - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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