As part of Sci-Fi Month, I decided to share some of my favorite science fiction short stories. These all come from my periodic round ups of free SFF short stories available for free online, so they’re all easy to access and read. The stories are organized alphabetically by author, not how much I like them. They’re all amazing stories, and I hope you find some you enjoy!

Charlie’s taken a job with a secret organization that’s altered his body, making him taller and more muscular. But even with these changes, Charlie doesn’t feel happy with himself.

The protagonist learns about his family’s secret, time travel, and he also learns about himself and his own identity.

It’s late in the 19th century, and literary works are often plundered by so-called “bookaneers.” These literary pirates swoop in, abscond with a manuscript and sell it to the highest bidder. The stories should be property of the reader, not the writer, the bookaneers argue. And they’ll stop at nothing to ensure it.

In The Last Bookaneer , bookseller Mr. Fergins recounts to railway waiter and enthusiastic reader Mr. Cotton the fascinating exploits of these bookish pirates. Fergins first encountered such a man, Wild Bill, when the bookaneer slipped a pirated manuscript into Fergins’ hands. The next day, a patron picked up the book and left Fergins with entirely too much money.

His curiosity piqued, Fergins eagerly follows the money trail of Bill’s subsequent requests. Before long, it leads Fergins to one of the greatest bookaneers of the age, Pen Davenport, who has his eye on his biggest mark yet: Robert Louis Stevenson, the author of Treasure Island . The ailing writer is sequestered in Samoa, and so the pair of pirates set sail in hopes of retrieving treasure. But Davenport’s nemesis is close at hand and time is running out: A new copyright treaty is set to go into effect on July 1, 1890, and manuscripts will no longer be fair game.

On December 6, 2016, the 16th Annual Massachusetts Book Awards Ceremony took place at the State House.  Click here to view photos of the event.

Congratulations to the Mass Book Award and Honors Winners for 2016! Download the Mass Book Awards poster:   massbook-18×24-poster2016crxtrim-10-12-16-1 .

Honors Fiction
Only the Strong by Jabari Asim (Agate)
Honey from the Lion by Matthew Neill Null (Lookout)
The Muralist by B.A. Shapiro (Algonquin)

Welcome to week three of the read along of Martha Wells’s  The Cloud Roads . This week covers Chapters 11 through 15. For my prior posts in the read along, visit the “Raksura Read Along” tag. Questions for this week are provided by  Anya . As always, there are spoilers below the cut.

Things between Pearl and Jade are getting even more tense. Do you think Pearl is lying about Jade using Moon? How do you think this conflict will end?

Ahhh, I’ve read the later books in this series already! I don’t want to say too much here, but what are the facts? Pearl’s already made it clear that she wants to get rid of Moon, and she’s been shifty practically this entire book. Moon’s got a ton of trust issues, so he’s likely to at least partly buy into anything she claims. The main question is whether or not he’ll stick around long enough to get Jade’s side of the story.

As part of Sci-Fi Month, I decided to share some of my favorite science fiction short stories. These all come from my periodic round ups of free SFF short stories available for free online, so they’re all easy to access and read. The stories are organized alphabetically by author, not how much I like them. They’re all amazing stories, and I hope you find some you enjoy!

Charlie’s taken a job with a secret organization that’s altered his body, making him taller and more muscular. But even with these changes, Charlie doesn’t feel happy with himself.

The protagonist learns about his family’s secret, time travel, and he also learns about himself and his own identity.

It’s late in the 19th century, and literary works are often plundered by so-called “bookaneers.” These literary pirates swoop in, abscond with a manuscript and sell it to the highest bidder. The stories should be property of the reader, not the writer, the bookaneers argue. And they’ll stop at nothing to ensure it.

In The Last Bookaneer , bookseller Mr. Fergins recounts to railway waiter and enthusiastic reader Mr. Cotton the fascinating exploits of these bookish pirates. Fergins first encountered such a man, Wild Bill, when the bookaneer slipped a pirated manuscript into Fergins’ hands. The next day, a patron picked up the book and left Fergins with entirely too much money.

His curiosity piqued, Fergins eagerly follows the money trail of Bill’s subsequent requests. Before long, it leads Fergins to one of the greatest bookaneers of the age, Pen Davenport, who has his eye on his biggest mark yet: Robert Louis Stevenson, the author of Treasure Island . The ailing writer is sequestered in Samoa, and so the pair of pirates set sail in hopes of retrieving treasure. But Davenport’s nemesis is close at hand and time is running out: A new copyright treaty is set to go into effect on July 1, 1890, and manuscripts will no longer be fair game.

On December 6, 2016, the 16th Annual Massachusetts Book Awards Ceremony took place at the State House.  Click here to view photos of the event.

Congratulations to the Mass Book Award and Honors Winners for 2016! Download the Mass Book Awards poster:   massbook-18×24-poster2016crxtrim-10-12-16-1 .

Honors Fiction
Only the Strong by Jabari Asim (Agate)
Honey from the Lion by Matthew Neill Null (Lookout)
The Muralist by B.A. Shapiro (Algonquin)

As part of Sci-Fi Month, I decided to share some of my favorite science fiction short stories. These all come from my periodic round ups of free SFF short stories available for free online, so they’re all easy to access and read. The stories are organized alphabetically by author, not how much I like them. They’re all amazing stories, and I hope you find some you enjoy!

Charlie’s taken a job with a secret organization that’s altered his body, making him taller and more muscular. But even with these changes, Charlie doesn’t feel happy with himself.

The protagonist learns about his family’s secret, time travel, and he also learns about himself and his own identity.

It’s late in the 19th century, and literary works are often plundered by so-called “bookaneers.” These literary pirates swoop in, abscond with a manuscript and sell it to the highest bidder. The stories should be property of the reader, not the writer, the bookaneers argue. And they’ll stop at nothing to ensure it.

In The Last Bookaneer , bookseller Mr. Fergins recounts to railway waiter and enthusiastic reader Mr. Cotton the fascinating exploits of these bookish pirates. Fergins first encountered such a man, Wild Bill, when the bookaneer slipped a pirated manuscript into Fergins’ hands. The next day, a patron picked up the book and left Fergins with entirely too much money.

His curiosity piqued, Fergins eagerly follows the money trail of Bill’s subsequent requests. Before long, it leads Fergins to one of the greatest bookaneers of the age, Pen Davenport, who has his eye on his biggest mark yet: Robert Louis Stevenson, the author of Treasure Island . The ailing writer is sequestered in Samoa, and so the pair of pirates set sail in hopes of retrieving treasure. But Davenport’s nemesis is close at hand and time is running out: A new copyright treaty is set to go into effect on July 1, 1890, and manuscripts will no longer be fair game.

As part of Sci-Fi Month, I decided to share some of my favorite science fiction short stories. These all come from my periodic round ups of free SFF short stories available for free online, so they’re all easy to access and read. The stories are organized alphabetically by author, not how much I like them. They’re all amazing stories, and I hope you find some you enjoy!

Charlie’s taken a job with a secret organization that’s altered his body, making him taller and more muscular. But even with these changes, Charlie doesn’t feel happy with himself.

The protagonist learns about his family’s secret, time travel, and he also learns about himself and his own identity.

Writing Warm Up: Point of View | Page in Training


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