The origin of this phrase is traced to a Latin poem from the book of Horace, Odes Book-I.  Later, many writers used it as a quote in their works. For instance, Lord Byron included it in his work Letters.  Horace uses it in his poem, Dum loquimur, fugerit invida/Aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.  According to Horace, our future is unpredicted, so we should do whatever we can do today, and do not count on chances and opportunities that might come in the future.

The exact meaning of this phrase is to “seize the day.” It is a proverb, which means that one should act today, and not wait for the future. More precisely, it refers to the plucking of the fruits. Thus, the full meaning of this line is to pluck your day, trust in the future as little as possible. In simple words, it means to enjoy today and the moment, without wasting time, because no one knows what may happen in the future.

The use of this is very common. We can use it in a similar way to other proverbs in English, which tell us that we should make the most of the time we have, as we have a short time on the earth. This phrase also serves as a central theme in the book “Dead Poet Society”. Other familiar English proverbs with similar meanings include, “the early bird catches the worm” and “strike while the iron is hot.” A teacher may advise his students, or else a waiter may ask his the customers “Carpe Diem.” In similar way, a spot or an event could have the slogan to attract tourists.

While residing in Buffalo, I allowed myself to settle for any mediocre job opportunity that was at hand, for the sake of making ends meet. I hated every second of each temp job I attained. During this time I allowed other people- employers -to look at me and form their assumptions about what I needed. And that desperate need was settling for their low wages, ridiculous long hours and heavy labor. I allowed a string of employers to both indirectly and directly tell me that my concerns and future aspirations did not matter; what mattered the most was my commitment to clocking-in to their schedule and doing what they demanded.

Today, I decided to take a chance without second guessing or overthinking the possible outcomes. Lately, I began accepting rejection as a commonality in my life, but today my warrior spirit showed up and led me to seek out a long awaited opportunity. I was watching everyone around me- close friends, former school peers and even relatives attain their glorious success in the job market.  I even believed in the reassuring repetitive phrase, “Don’t worry your time will come, it’ll show up when you least expect it.”

I waited…waited and waited. I’ve been waiting for almost 5 months for this wonderful, mind-blowing opportunity to miraculously appear in my emails or present itself in a voicemail.

“I went into the woods because I wanted to live deliberately. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life… to put to rout all that was not life; and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.” ~Henry David Thoreau in “Walden” , quoted by the Character Neil in the Movie “Dead Poets Society”

If we really look at it closely we can see what a strong and liberating message “Carpe Diem” holds: life is now and life will always only be now. The present moment is really all there ever is to experience everything. So it is to us to take this responsibility for ourselves and seize it fully.

Yet – it also entails the message not to waste a single moment. It means giving our all, being the best we could possibly be. It means dropping what still holds us back, dissolving the resistance to what we are and to what could be. It means to free ourselves from what we are not and to set free that what we really are. Let’s have a look together at how we can seize the day and make this happen …

The origin of this phrase is traced to a Latin poem from the book of Horace, Odes Book-I.  Later, many writers used it as a quote in their works. For instance, Lord Byron included it in his work Letters.  Horace uses it in his poem, Dum loquimur, fugerit invida/Aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.  According to Horace, our future is unpredicted, so we should do whatever we can do today, and do not count on chances and opportunities that might come in the future.

The exact meaning of this phrase is to “seize the day.” It is a proverb, which means that one should act today, and not wait for the future. More precisely, it refers to the plucking of the fruits. Thus, the full meaning of this line is to pluck your day, trust in the future as little as possible. In simple words, it means to enjoy today and the moment, without wasting time, because no one knows what may happen in the future.

The use of this is very common. We can use it in a similar way to other proverbs in English, which tell us that we should make the most of the time we have, as we have a short time on the earth. This phrase also serves as a central theme in the book “Dead Poet Society”. Other familiar English proverbs with similar meanings include, “the early bird catches the worm” and “strike while the iron is hot.” A teacher may advise his students, or else a waiter may ask his the customers “Carpe Diem.” In similar way, a spot or an event could have the slogan to attract tourists.

While residing in Buffalo, I allowed myself to settle for any mediocre job opportunity that was at hand, for the sake of making ends meet. I hated every second of each temp job I attained. During this time I allowed other people- employers -to look at me and form their assumptions about what I needed. And that desperate need was settling for their low wages, ridiculous long hours and heavy labor. I allowed a string of employers to both indirectly and directly tell me that my concerns and future aspirations did not matter; what mattered the most was my commitment to clocking-in to their schedule and doing what they demanded.

Today, I decided to take a chance without second guessing or overthinking the possible outcomes. Lately, I began accepting rejection as a commonality in my life, but today my warrior spirit showed up and led me to seek out a long awaited opportunity. I was watching everyone around me- close friends, former school peers and even relatives attain their glorious success in the job market.  I even believed in the reassuring repetitive phrase, “Don’t worry your time will come, it’ll show up when you least expect it.”

I waited…waited and waited. I’ve been waiting for almost 5 months for this wonderful, mind-blowing opportunity to miraculously appear in my emails or present itself in a voicemail.

The origin of this phrase is traced to a Latin poem from the book of Horace, Odes Book-I.  Later, many writers used it as a quote in their works. For instance, Lord Byron included it in his work Letters.  Horace uses it in his poem, Dum loquimur, fugerit invida/Aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.  According to Horace, our future is unpredicted, so we should do whatever we can do today, and do not count on chances and opportunities that might come in the future.

The exact meaning of this phrase is to “seize the day.” It is a proverb, which means that one should act today, and not wait for the future. More precisely, it refers to the plucking of the fruits. Thus, the full meaning of this line is to pluck your day, trust in the future as little as possible. In simple words, it means to enjoy today and the moment, without wasting time, because no one knows what may happen in the future.

The use of this is very common. We can use it in a similar way to other proverbs in English, which tell us that we should make the most of the time we have, as we have a short time on the earth. This phrase also serves as a central theme in the book “Dead Poet Society”. Other familiar English proverbs with similar meanings include, “the early bird catches the worm” and “strike while the iron is hot.” A teacher may advise his students, or else a waiter may ask his the customers “Carpe Diem.” In similar way, a spot or an event could have the slogan to attract tourists.

What Happens in Carpediem. - Comic Rocket webcomic list


What Happens in Carpediem by Piggy Ho Ho - Goodreads

Posted by 2018 article

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