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A church's name is meaningful because it conveys important information. From its name, we learn about the identity of believers and how they express their relationship to the divine. A name can also tell us how a church distinguishes itself from other similar faiths. In 1830, as Joseph Smith's revelations became scriptures and people warmed to this new testament, it became clear that his fledgling faith community needed a name. Joseph and early Church leaders looked to the Book of Mormon for guidance.

For devout Mormons, the name of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints results from divine revelation, from the Word of God as communicated to his chosen prophet, Joseph Smith. The name reinforces the unique and instrumental role Latter-day Saints play in the restoration of the church: "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord's kingdom once again established on the earth, preparatory to the Second Coming of the Messiah." [1]

For members, the Church's name signifies the community's special responsibility, and it designates the crucial role every member, or saint, has in bringing about God's kingdom. Name alterations occurring in its early years indicate Church leaders' inspired efforts to transmit the intentions of God in human language.

The highest-ranking governing body in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the First Presidency, consisting of the president and his two counselors, or advisers. This three-man body supervises the work of the entire Church in all matters of policy, organization and administration.

The second-highest presiding body in Church government is the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Apostles serve under the direction of the First Presidency and have heavy administrative responsibilities to oversee the orderly progress and development of the Church throughout the world. The First Presidency and Twelve Apostles are regarded by Latter-day Saints as prophets who receive divine revelation and inspiration to guide the Church.

The appointment of a new president of the Church happens in an orderly way that — remarkably in today’s world — avoids any trace of internal lobbying for position or rank. Viewed by members as a divinely revealed process, it is devoid of electioneering whether behind the scenes or in public.

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Attention : This site does not support the current version of your web browser. To get the best possible experience using our website we recommend that you upgrade to a newer version or install another Web Browser .

Rights and Use Information (Updated 2016-09-01) Privacy Policy (Updated 2014-03-18)
© 2018 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

A church's name is meaningful because it conveys important information. From its name, we learn about the identity of believers and how they express their relationship to the divine. A name can also tell us how a church distinguishes itself from other similar faiths. In 1830, as Joseph Smith's revelations became scriptures and people warmed to this new testament, it became clear that his fledgling faith community needed a name. Joseph and early Church leaders looked to the Book of Mormon for guidance.

For devout Mormons, the name of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints results from divine revelation, from the Word of God as communicated to his chosen prophet, Joseph Smith. The name reinforces the unique and instrumental role Latter-day Saints play in the restoration of the church: "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord's kingdom once again established on the earth, preparatory to the Second Coming of the Messiah." [1]

For members, the Church's name signifies the community's special responsibility, and it designates the crucial role every member, or saint, has in bringing about God's kingdom. Name alterations occurring in its early years indicate Church leaders' inspired efforts to transmit the intentions of God in human language.

Attention : This site does not support the current version of your web browser. To get the best possible experience using our website we recommend that you upgrade to a newer version or install another Web Browser .

Rights and Use Information (Updated 2016-09-01) Privacy Policy (Updated 2014-03-18)
© 2018 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

A church's name is meaningful because it conveys important information. From its name, we learn about the identity of believers and how they express their relationship to the divine. A name can also tell us how a church distinguishes itself from other similar faiths. In 1830, as Joseph Smith's revelations became scriptures and people warmed to this new testament, it became clear that his fledgling faith community needed a name. Joseph and early Church leaders looked to the Book of Mormon for guidance.

For devout Mormons, the name of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints results from divine revelation, from the Word of God as communicated to his chosen prophet, Joseph Smith. The name reinforces the unique and instrumental role Latter-day Saints play in the restoration of the church: "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord's kingdom once again established on the earth, preparatory to the Second Coming of the Messiah." [1]

For members, the Church's name signifies the community's special responsibility, and it designates the crucial role every member, or saint, has in bringing about God's kingdom. Name alterations occurring in its early years indicate Church leaders' inspired efforts to transmit the intentions of God in human language.

The highest-ranking governing body in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the First Presidency, consisting of the president and his two counselors, or advisers. This three-man body supervises the work of the entire Church in all matters of policy, organization and administration.

The second-highest presiding body in Church government is the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Apostles serve under the direction of the First Presidency and have heavy administrative responsibilities to oversee the orderly progress and development of the Church throughout the world. The First Presidency and Twelve Apostles are regarded by Latter-day Saints as prophets who receive divine revelation and inspiration to guide the Church.

The appointment of a new president of the Church happens in an orderly way that — remarkably in today’s world — avoids any trace of internal lobbying for position or rank. Viewed by members as a divinely revealed process, it is devoid of electioneering whether behind the scenes or in public.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - Wikipedia


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